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Blooded Horses Running Wild in London....Fresh symbolism from the mischeif gang! What could it mean?


factJack

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Horses running wild in london, one badly blooded. Must be code for something like the dear executed in Liverpoold

 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-68887800

 

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Four injured after runaway military horses bolted in central London

 

Four people have been taken to hospital after five runaway horses of the Household Cavalry raced through central London, some colliding with traffic.

Four soldiers were unseated after the horses were spooked during an exercise in Belgravia, the Army said. One soldier was responsible for two horses.

Video on social media shows a grey and a black horse running through Aldwych, one with blood on its chest and legs.

 

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"Crazy Horses" (The Osmonds)

 

Their song is about air pollution. "Crazy Horses" represents automobiles - "horsepower" - that create pollution in the skies from the exhaust.
This was written by Alan, Merrill, and Wayne Osmond. They were the oldest of the group, all fathers and concerned about the polluted world their children would inherit.

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'Bloodied white horse ...'

 

Could this be the fabled 'Horse of a Different Colour?'

 

Back on August 2, 1959 the Daily Reporter newspaper of Spender, Iowa published a news story entitled, “Reds Will Live In Era Of Fear If Aggression Continues — Nixon.”  The story was about then Vice-President Richard M. Nixon who addressed the Soviet people in a TV-radio address that was listened to by millions of citizens as he commented on the Soviet foreign policy.

 

The vice-president took strong exception to the slogan “Let us work for the victory of communism” which he saw frequently on his tour.

“If Mr. Khrushchev means by this slogan working for a better life for the people within the Soviet Union that is one thing,” Nixon said.  “If, on the other hand, he means the victory of communism over the United States and other countries this is a horse of a different color.  For we have our own ideas as to what system is best for us.”

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It takes a lot to spook a Household Cavalary horse. I used to "do" the one that my neighbour brought out with him when he left the Life Guards. The horse loved lorries and motorbikes, screaming kids and anything you'd expect to find in a town, but, to be fair, he was petrified of goats and chickens. I used to take him to the next village to do my shopping.

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7 hours ago, shadowmoon said:

War.. they said yesterday uk defence manufacturers going on a war footing. 

 

Yes, the news to increase the defense funding is all over the newspaper today.

 

Interesting that there wasn't a white horse but black (feminine) and grey (masculine). 😉

Today is 24042024 = 6 6 6 😆 Release the Chaos!

It's all symbolic. Where is Danny? 😁

 

EDIT: my bad, there was a white horse with paint on it.

Edited by DaleP
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37 minutes ago, Anti Facts Sir said:

White horse symbolises death, doesn't it. I remember the photos (photoshopped, natch) with Her Maj - standing between "her 2 favourite white horses" in those weird months where they were trying to pretend she was still alive.

 

ah so does that mean someone is dead? We have some idea who it may be.....

Yesterday was full moon btw.

Edited by DaleP
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The pale horse isn't the white one. 

Wikipedia says:

 

The color of Death's horse is written as khlōros (χλωρός) in the original Koine Greek,[50] which can mean either green/greenish-yellow or pale/pallid.[51] The color is often translated as "pale", though "ashen", "pale green", and "yellowish green"[35] are other possible interpretations (the Greek word is the root of "chlorophyll" and "chlorine"). Based on the uses of the word in ancient Greek medical literature, several scholars suggest that the color reflects the sickly pallor of a corpse.[5][52] In some modern artistic depictions, the horse is distinctly green.[53][54][55]

Edited by Grumpy Grapes
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25 minutes ago, EnigmaticWorld said:

The White Horse Rampant, or the Saxon steed obviously holds a lot of significance with the English.

 

Yes the white horse is symbolic of Saxons, Hengest and Horsa fought under a white horse standard. There's also the Uffington white horse which dates further back to the bronze age.  

 

https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-the-war-standard-of-the-white-horse-the-standard-was-associated-with-165453234.html  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hengist_and_Horsa 

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22 minutes ago, Campion said:

 

Yes the white horse is symbolic of Saxons, Hengest and Horsa fought under a white horse standard. There's also the Uffington white horse which dates further back to the bronze age.  

 

https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-the-war-standard-of-the-white-horse-the-standard-was-associated-with-165453234.html  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hengist_and_Horsa 

 

Yep the symbol of Kent, my county. It's said that men of Kent were too much trouble to bother with, so the Normans had to come to agreement with us, hence the Invicta (unconquered) motto. That same Kentish spirit is seen in others like Watt Tyler too, although it's disputed as to whether he was actually born in Kent or Essex, but we have Watt Tyler pubs.

 

mok.jpg

 

"For Kent, it dates back to the invasion of England by Duke William of Normandy in the year 1066. As the official motto, it appears on the coat of arms of Kent County Council.

 

Leaving the battle site at Hastings, William marched on to London on his way to the (then) capital Winchester. While passing through Kent, the local people attacked and harassed William's men. The uncertain William and his army fled and went a different route to London. As the people of Kent had chased William away, they adopted 'Invicta' as a county motto."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invicta_(motto)

 

"Kent was founded, according to tradition, in the middle of the 5th cent. by two brothers of Jutish origin, Hengist and Horsa"

https://www.oxfordreference.com/display/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100033956

 

"the Jutish kingdom of Kent"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jutes

Edited by EnigmaticWorld
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Look at 24 seconds in, this guy taking a photo is a pro photographer...he's got two cameras on him.

I'd say staged.

 

The horses must be friends because they didn't go a separate way.

 

I blame 5G. They are being affected too. 🤭

 

See Chaos everywhere!

 

😂

 

Edited by DaleP
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5 hours ago, Grumpy Grapes said:

Looking at the footage of the black and white horses, I'm intrigued by the 4 other photographers (professionals?) alongside the cameraman who filmed the horses running past. The film quality seems beyond that of a mobile phone. 

Also where's the bloody traffic? All the streets are virtually empty....

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15 hours ago, EnigmaticWorld said:

That same Kentish spirit is seen in others like Watt Tyler too, although it's disputed as to whether he was actually born in Kent or Essex, but we have Watt Tyler pubs.

He was definitely one of our mob mate. Not from Essex. 

 

But they'll probably try and say he was Asian soon anyway. Moh Mahmood across the street is a direct descendent type think. 

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23 hours ago, EnigmaticWorld said:

 

Yep the symbol of Kent, my county. It's said that men of Kent were too much trouble to bother with, so the Normans had to come to agreement with us, hence the Invicta (unconquered) motto. That same Kentish spirit is seen in others like Watt Tyler too, although it's disputed as to whether he was actually born in Kent or Essex, but we have Watt Tyler pubs.

 

mok.jpg

 

"For Kent, it dates back to the invasion of England by Duke William of Normandy in the year 1066. As the official motto, it appears on the coat of arms of Kent County Council.

 

Leaving the battle site at Hastings, William marched on to London on his way to the (then) capital Winchester. While passing through Kent, the local people attacked and harassed William's men. The uncertain William and his army fled and went a different route to London. As the people of Kent had chased William away, they adopted 'Invicta' as a county motto."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invicta_(motto)

 

"Kent was founded, according to tradition, in the middle of the 5th cent. by two brothers of Jutish origin, Hengist and Horsa"

https://www.oxfordreference.com/display/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100033956

 

"the Jutish kingdom of Kent"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jutes

 

The county of Kent is close to my heart too.

 

To add to your information about the Norman invasion, this is, according to some researchers, also where the distinction between being a "Man (or Maid) of Kent" of "Kentish Man (or Maid)" originates from.

 

The most common understanding is that those to the west of the River Medway, from its dividing point in Rainham, are considered "Kentish Men" whereas those to the east are "Men of Kent". But there is likely more to the story in terms of separation between the Anglo-Saxon and Jutish settlements either side of the river and the strength of their resistance against the Normans.

 

https://www.kentonline.co.uk/maidstone/news/are-you-a-man-of-kent-or-kentish-man-228500/

 

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It appears that above all else the Men of Kent may have been the greater propagandists, because one tale also tells of how the tribes of the east of the county refused to allow William the Conqueror to pass through without allowing them to retain certain old rights and privileges.

 

This story takes us right back to years following the retreat of the Roman empire from the shores of this land jutting out between the North Sea and the English Channel.

 

It is widely held that invading tribes who came after the Romans - led by the legendary brothers Hengist and Horsa - settled in what we now know as Kent, with the Anglo Saxons occupying what we now think of as west Kent while the Jutes settled to the east of the Medway.

 

For centuries that followed, these Germanic peoples ruled over Kent and much of the country, establishing their own laws and customs, until in 1066 the Normans came from across the Channel in a new wave of invasion.

 

Legend has it that, possibly on his way to Dover to return to his native Normandy, William was prevented from passing unhindered through East Kent by representatives of the Men of Kent.

 

Symbolically they are said to have held out a branch or a sword, and told William to choose - treaty or war.

 

In opting for the branch he is understood to have offered both the Men of Kent and the Kentish Men the retention of certain rights and customs if in return they would accept him as their King.

 

Historians have argued this is why a system for passing on a deceased persons estate to all heirs, known as Gavelkind, continued to be used in Kent when in the rest of the realm all went to the eldest son.

 

The legend of William choosing to accommodate the peoples of Kent rather than meet them in battle is also understood to have led to the county's adoption of the motto Invicta, which means unconquered in Latin.

 

But whichever story you prefer as the origin of the county's divide, the friendly but passionate rivalry between the Men of Kent and the Kentish Men is likely to go on for some time yet.

 

 

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