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Mr H

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Just in my experience. I noticed, that generally speaking, a lot of the people who didn't take the vax, are those that left school at 16. Window cleaners, builders, van drivers etc... got me thinking about my education experience. 

 

I spent half my life in education, the best years. With a bunch of people I didn't know.

 

And the honest truth is, I learned nothing! Which is quite amazing considering time spent. (Only practical stuff I know came after on paid courses)

 

I mean the things I do use, basic maths my mum taught me. Reading and writing my brother taught.

 

It was quite a waste of time thinking back on the experience.

 

Things I would have liked to have learned at school off the top of my head, probably many more

 

-Nutrition and how to grow food

-Plumbing, electrics, basic building skills

-driving

- money management

-how to attract a partner and start a family

-morals and ethics

-how to start a business

- law. I mean no one tells you the law, and you meant to abide by it!

- how to defend yourself

- social skills and communication

- first aid and basic necessary medicines

 

What was your education experience like?

 

Did you actually learn something?

 

Do you wish you'd have learned something else during your time there?

 

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2 hours ago, Mr H said:

Just in my experience. I noticed, that generally speaking, a lot of the people who didn't take the vax, are those that left school at 16. Window cleaners, builders, van drivers etc... got me thinking about my education experience. 

 

I spent half my life in education, the best years. With a bunch of people I didn't know.

 

And the honest truth is, I learned nothing! Which is quite amazing considering time spent. (Only practical stuff I know came after on paid courses)

 

I mean the things I do use, basic maths my mum taught me. Reading and writing my brother taught.

 

It was quite a waste of time thinking back on the experience.

 

Things I would have liked to have learned at school off the top of my head, probably many more

 

-Nutrition and how to grow food

-Plumbing, electrics, basic building skills

-driving

- money management

-how to attract a partner and start a family

-morals and ethics

-how to start a business

- law. I mean no one tells you the law, and you meant to abide by it!

- how to defend yourself

- social skills and communication

- first aid and basic necessary medicines

 

What was your education experience like?

 

Did you actually learn something?

 

Do you wish you'd have learned something else during your time there?

 

My schooldays were a nightmare, having the piss taken out of me for wearing jumble sale clothing, or my cousin's hand me downs, which he told all his school mates 'those used to be my trousers' etc. Bullied by the woodwork teacher because my mother couldn't afford the bits of wood needed to make useless items, or even afford to get me a woodworker's apron, consequently I usually had the job of weeding the flower beds outside the woodwork room! If it was raining I would be inside tidying out a cupboard or something. Mr Gee had two doors in the woodwork room, one of which he used to surreptitiously lock during the lesson, and then when the bell went everyone had to get out a quickly as possible because he used to throw a mallet or something heavy at the last person exiting the room! I quickly figured a plan out, I'd watch to see which door could be opened and then dive into that queue whilst a few others would inevitably be at the locked door before realising their mistake! I was 'awarded' free school dinners, but my cousin and his cronies took the piss every time because the free dinners pupils had to stand at the back of the queue behind the 'payers' and get what ever was left!

After about the first week that was enough for me, I went walkabout at dinnertime rather than face the sneers and taunts! Thursdays was my favourite day, there was a local cattle marketdownload(57).jpg.b2c4c61bc8339a9b8cca17b9f1cd57b8.jpg about 100 yards from the school and I'd always end up there, rain or shine, I loved that place and it was the only time I ever felt free in those school years, and I spent the afternoon there! Granddad always found out and I always got his belt across my arse along with the words 'this hurts me more than it hurts you'! I understand what he meant now, but not then obviously! He was a hard working man who'd fathered 13 kids, two of them had died quite young, and so he had to keep discipline somehow! As for schooling I hardly got anything useful out of it and when I eventually left, it was at the age of 15 back then in the 1960's, I self educated myself by reading about almost any subjects that interested me in library books and the like. Granddad had a few tools in his  old metal shed

download(58).jpg.6906ff99d78f05bb0788b5252165fad9.jpg

and I'd make trolleys out old timber and pram wheels, and once he got me two long strips of wood and I made Granny a couple of line props by sawing a notch in one end of each strip! Over time I educated myself more in the school of life than those official schools ever did, and all this was way before P.C. and WOKE took over the 'education system'!

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@Mr Crabtree

 

Thanks I really enjoyed reading your experience and it gives me an idea what it was like back then.

 

I too had to enjoy the pleasure of my brother's hand me downs, which was already handed down from someone else! Lucky me! :)

 

I was wondering. In terms of corporal punishment. Did any of the kids ever have the nerve to fight back? Or everyone was just too scared and knew their place so to speak?

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I always struggled at school. It's not that I wasn't smart enough, I just had very little interest in the whole thing. Got into trouble quite a lot for not submitting homework. I didn't misbehave or anything, it just wasn't for me I don't think. I'm not great at respecting authority, and lets face it, there are a lot of teachers with huge egos out there. My mum raised us as a single parent - we never knew how poor we were because she never made us want for anything, but looking back yeah, we were quite poor.

 

I finished school in 2000 and went straight to college. Same issues there. Apparently we would be treated like adults in college but we weren't and I had the same issues. I ended up leaving school and college with distinctly average grades, but looking back, the qualifications I got have had practically no bearing on my life now. Schools make SATS and GCSE's sound like they are so important but no one really seems to care in the real world, and A-Levels were just a stepping stone for students wanting to go to uni. 

 

I applied for uni in York, and got in, but backed out last minute. I wasn't emotionally/mentally mature enough for it and I can guarantee I would have flopped within the year and dropped out. So I started working instead, first some crappy retail jobs, then in pharmacy where I stayed for a good 15 years. I enjoyed the medical stuff, but overall the general public suck, and I couldn't stand working with them anymore. So I went to uni as a mature student in 2014. I liked uni for the most part, even though they aren't about education (they are just a business focussed on the money). We were often taught how to pass exams - it was more a memory test than a knowledge one, but uni did teach me to think critically and gave me the foundation I needed for my career. I graduated as an aerospace engineer and went straight into work. I did my Masters part time in Data Science and am in the final year of my PhD in materials science now, alongside working full time. 

 

I did get all the vaccines. I'd never really understood what was going on behind the scenes until recently, and in hindsight I wouldn't have gotten them if I'd known. But can't change what has already occurred, so I suppose I'll just have to wait and see if anything happens!

 

Overall, I don't think school really taught me much. I was picked on quite a lot, never enjoyed it, embarrassed a lot but got through it. College certainly didn't teach me much. Uni taught me to think critically and question things around me, but that was due to a small handful of really amazing lecturers and friends rather than the institution itself. 

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6 hours ago, Mr H said:

Just in my experience. I noticed, that generally speaking, a lot of the people who didn't take the vax, are those that left school at 16. Window cleaners, builders, van drivers etc... got me thinking about my education experience. 

 

I spent half my life in education, the best years. With a bunch of people I didn't know.

 

And the honest truth is, I learned nothing! Which is quite amazing considering time spent. (Only practical stuff I know came after on paid courses)

 

I mean the things I do use, basic maths my mum taught me. Reading and writing my brother taught.

 

It was quite a waste of time thinking back on the experience.

 

Things I would have liked to have learned at school off the top of my head, probably many more

 

-Nutrition and how to grow food

-Plumbing, electrics, basic building skills

-driving

- money management

-how to attract a partner and start a family

-morals and ethics

-how to start a business

- law. I mean no one tells you the law, and you meant to abide by it!

- how to defend yourself

- social skills and communication

- first aid and basic necessary medicines

 

What was your education experience like?

 

Did you actually learn something?

 

Do you wish you'd have learned something else during your time there?

 

Is this for your psychology course? 

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4 hours ago, Mr H said:

@Mr Crabtree

 

Thanks I really enjoyed reading your experience and it gives me an idea what it was like back then.

 

I too had to enjoy the pleasure of my brother's hand me downs, which was already handed down from someone else! Lucky me! :)

 

I was wondering. In terms of corporal punishment. Did any of the kids ever have the nerve to fight back? Or everyone was just too scared and knew their place so to speak?

To be fair most teachers were alright, a lot being ex service men, but, there were some real bastards too, the exceptions that prove the rule I suppose🤔 the only violent episode I can recall, was when Mrs Peplow stormed into the classroom and chinned Mr Belk🧑‍🎓for grabbing her son Raymond and pulling him out of his seat the day before!😟 Phyliis Peplow was only a slightly built lady but she packed a wallop that put Belk on the deck, after he fell against the swiveling blackboard on his way down!👍

download(59).jpg.15aef5d2ffd428296aab1872fd354d1c.jpg

I really think that he was more surprised than hurt, certainly his pride was🤫 but no one called the police or an ambulance, the headmaster came, asked Mrs Peplow to leave and that basically, was it! Although, the kids did call Mr Belk 'Biffo Belk' behind his back for a long time afterwards!🤭 I think the anger behind Mrs Peplow's punch was partly down to the fact that her husband had done a 'moonlight flit' with a woman a couple of doors up from their prefab a week or so before leaving her to cope with four kids on her own, no mean feat in the 50's when stuff we now take for granted was still scarce although the war had been over for a few years.

download(60).jpg.cd56e0ebc2ba139193aa3024c883c5ed.jpg

1950's prefab.

 

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I never enjoyed school, the repressive and controlling aspect of it is my over-riding memory. My favourite subject was History, which I now know is largely propaganda anyway.

 

Education is a system of control, as is Religion, the truths of things we are taught are scrupulously edited, so that we all believe the same self-limiting things, examination marks are awarded for complying with the information they want you to know, not for envisaging better ideas, reality or outcomes for all.

 

I have often wondered for example, why languages are not taught at an earlier age, in a more interactive way, it is as though ‘The Establishment’ do not want Britons speaking other languages.

 

Some of the subjects you have listed Mr H, would help to develop interest, interaction and creativity in self-sufficiency skills, which are largely missing from the UK curriculum; if they could be taught by teachers who were self-aware, creative and knowledgeable and not themselves conditioned to comply with the status quo.

 

Some topics are innate though and can’t be taught, I wouldn’t want to live by someone else’s idea of morals and ethics, or how to attract a partner. Also if they taught us about Law it would be inevitably be inverted, as revealed in SuperstarNeilC’s thread The Occult Art of Law.

 

So I have arrived at the conclusion that the school system, in the UK at least, is not designed to teach us anything useful or to be enjoyed. It is designed to indoctrinate our perception, that in order to be accepted by our peers, we should conform to rules. Thus we are socially conditioned into knowing just enough to act as a workforce to be exploited and not ask questions, or push back, for fear of punishing consequences.

 

Yet competition is encouraged between us all, to create the divide and rule ethic, rather than encouraging individuals to aim for a sense of achievement by excelling in subjects they enjoy without comparison to others.

 

The whole school experience is so unpleasant ‘local authorities’ threaten parents with fines or prison for a child’s understandable non-attendance, so why should it appear to be compulsory?

According to educationotherwise.org “the Education Act states that parents are responsible for their children’s education, ‘either by regular attendance at school or otherwise’; the fact is that education is compulsory, but schooling is not”.

 

Some people are even enticed into paying for their child’s education, believing it gives them some kind of advantage; ok it may instil in them an egoic sense of superiority over others and the false confidence of believing they can subjugate others and thereby ‘manage’ people, companies, or countries.

 

As we can clearly see though, regarding the most ‘successful’ of these types, governments at all levels are incompetent, ineffective and self-serving, their ‘key players’ are trained how to think and act as young global leaders on behalf of the WEF. So they were obviously not taught to think for themselves at school, they were merely compliant in following a pre-planned agenda.

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There was a quite a well known public school in my home town that was quite elitist and I was always under the impression, from quite an early age that pupils there were taught stuff that us secondary modern kids were never taught! I don't mean just Latin or any of that hocus pocus, but really secretive stuff to get them well into a jolly good career when hardly out of their teens! I eventually  realised that a lot of it was also the 'Old School Tie' system where old pals of Daddy's from 'hoity toity public school' would give a young chap a leg up the ladder to help out the son of a chap who was an old boy from their elite school!👍 My mother of course, being not too well educated herself said things like 'you're yampy you are' or you wanna be careful they don't lock you up in a loony bin fer sayin' stuff like that, know your place, and stick to it before you get in trouble'! I'm glad I never followed her sage advice and metaphorically touching my forelock to better educated people! As a youth I followed the Pleb trail, I got pissed, I  got into juvenile scraps, I got my leg over as often as possible, I  ended up in Magistrates courts several times for stupid things, in fact I just followed the course through life that had been set for no hopers like me, and really thought it was all my own doing, my own idea basically!  Of course I was wrong, all this was instilled into lads like me by the schools telling us we were unfit for anything other than factory life, or going into labouring on building sites etc! Ours was just a road leading to a stint in a Borstal or approved school, where hopefully 'they' would make men out of us!

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primary school when i was 10,11,12 was my best memories.

we had an awesome group of sporty lads beating other schools at football and rugby

there was fierce rivalry between schools

2 awesome male teachers training us.

everyone seemed to get on.

 

secondary school hated every minute of it

didn't like the majority of kids in my year, they were awful.

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On 3/25/2024 at 6:08 AM, Mr H said:

Just in my experience. I noticed, that generally speaking, a lot of the people who didn't take the vax, are those that left school at 16. Window cleaners, builders, van drivers etc... got me thinking about my education experience. 

 

I spent half my life in education, the best years. With a bunch of people I didn't know.

 

And the honest truth is, I learned nothing! Which is quite amazing considering time spent. (Only practical stuff I know came after on paid courses)

 

I mean the things I do use, basic maths my mum taught me. Reading and writing my brother taught.

 

It was quite a waste of time thinking back on the experience.

 

Things I would have liked to have learned at school off the top of my head, probably many more

 

-Nutrition and how to grow food

-Plumbing, electrics, basic building skills

-driving

- money management

-how to attract a partner and start a family

-morals and ethics

-how to start a business

- law. I mean no one tells you the law, and you meant to abide by it!

- how to defend yourself

- social skills and communication

- first aid and basic necessary medicines

 

What was your education experience like?

 

Did you actually learn something?

 

Do you wish you'd have learned something else during your time there?

 

 

It was all so .......................pointless, forced and about controlling people rather than the education.

 

Many teachers, not all, some are good, were there simply to take out their anger and use the school like a personal emotional punchbag, rather than actually educate people.

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The difference between these fee paying public schools and your bog standard comprehensive is the posh ones teach you how to pass the exams. They train you into using tips like the cornel note taking system and other shizzle. A normal school just throw shit at you and hope it sticks. I was told this by a woman who'd been to a fee paying school. When I was doing exams they said do your revision. they didn't actually say how to revise so we would just read the boring shit in our txt books if we could be bothered.

This is how even a thick posh kid ends up with a better job then a clever kid from coucil estate. inteligence is something everyone has but obviously for many people it goes untapped, or they think they're thick because  inteligence is a gift which they weren't fortunate to have.

low esteem makes people think theyre thick too. They think the answer is something more complex when it's right in front of them.

I used to think i was thick as a brick but now I know it was the teachers who was total mongs. I've proved this recetnly by doing courses and smashing them with my techniques to  store it in my head, Even if it's a boring subject Im not into.

 

Unfortuanly for kids of today you get some of the worst kind of people who train to be teachers. the sort of snooty oh im a teacher I only date fellow proffessionals up their own arse types. .Not to mention all the agenda's govs have embedded into the curriclum.

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Spot on mate, you nailed the entire system in your post, well said! I loved going to school, and I loved going home, it was that boring bit in between going and coming back that bored the shit out of me! With most teachers, {admittedly not all} you could see they really didn't want to be there, images(2).jpg.c25775c6ed35ca943194e7866e9b9c3d.jpgand some took their frustrations out on the easy targets, the class thickos, and there were always a few of those in every class!download(1).jpg.a575df6f1ebf0ef56543ad5f4a197def.jpg

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I always struggled in school as well. I wasn't smart and had to struggle just to get C's. Through my 12 years in school I was constantly made fun of and felt like an absolute moron. About 15 years after I graduate high school I decided to get my Bachelors degree. I was so scared to start school, but I had to use my G.I. Bill or it was going to expire soon. 

First I started with graphic design, but soon realized that the future market outlook, at the time, wasn't too good. So I switched to a Bachelors in History.  My plan was to get a Masters in Secondary Education if everything went well. It wasn't until I started my coursework for my history degree that I learned about the different types of learning styles.  This is the first I had ever heard of them. After I figured how which type of learner I am, school was a breeze.  That dumb child who barely got C's in grades 1-12, graduated with a 4.0 GPA and never got a grade below 98%.

My question is: why was I never taught this in my first 12 years of school?

Throughout my life I've met many different types of people and have realized that "you can't judge the intelligence of a fish by how it climbs a tree."

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On 3/25/2024 at 2:08 AM, Mr H said:

 

Things I would have liked to have learned at school off the top of my head, probably many more

 

-Nutrition and how to grow food

-Plumbing, electrics, basic building skills

-driving

- money management

-how to attract a partner and start a family

-morals and ethics

-how to start a business

- law. I mean no one tells you the law, and you meant to abide by it!

- how to defend yourself

- social skills and communication

- first aid and basic necessary medicines

 

What was your education experience like?

 

Did you actually learn something?

 

Do you wish you'd have learned something else during your time there?

 

You make some great points here on subjects that would have been nice to learn in school. I don't know about anyone else's experience, but I learned those subjects from church and the Boy Scouts. Grant it, the Church didn't teach me how to defend myself or about nutrition, but the Boy Scouts did. I was lucky enough to have extracurricular activities that allowed for me to grow. My grandmother and martial arts were also a big part of me learning valuable lessons and skills.

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Honestly - we need programs where we send students abroad to places like Thailand and Australia for about 3 months and they can learn outside by the sea.

 

The problem is also Britain.

 

Learning inside a grey rectangular building (many with asbestos) is so difficult and tiring.

 

 

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