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Is the news media and government lying about the economy and inflation?


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The news media and government never really is saying what is causing inflation all you get here and there may be it was Covid lockdowns may be it was war with Russia and Ukraine.

 

Also people are saying the government is lying about the economy and inflation. Not sure what they mean by that.

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The explanation I heard was that the west put sanctions on Russia for invading Ukraine by stopping buying their gas and oil. That caused a price rise so Russia was making more profit margin for the gas and oil it is able to sell to the non-western countries. 

 

So the sanctions are probably hurting us more than Russia, and our governments have borrowed money to subsidise energy prices for us. The UK's debt ratio is 103% of GDP compared to 20% for Russia.  

 

I guess the covid lockdowns and borrowing could also cause inflation. So this inflation which our governments caused is another transfer of wealth out of the west to other countries which didn't do lockdowns or sanctions. 

 

Edited by Campion
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15 hours ago, Lilymoon said:

The news media and government never really is saying what is causing inflation all you get here and there may be it was Covid lockdowns may be it was war with Russia and Ukraine.

 

Also people are saying the government is lying about the economy and inflation. Not sure what they mean by that.

Nobody talks about actual inflation or the cause. They talk about price consumer inflation which is an effect of inflation not inflation itself.

 

Inflation means to expand. When we speak of money, to expand money means to expand the money supply.

 

Since the dollars inception, they have expanded the supply so much that in real terms it has lost 97% of it's value over time.

 

The cause. Is the central banksters. Who do this on purpose, the game being, inflate money supply = asset prices go up, wages and purchasing parity down. Step no 2, the rich who don't need a salary swap money for assets, so their real wealth increases, conversely wage earners who cannot afford assets get poorer have to work longer hours. At the same time they make you indebted in the future too by giving the government money that does not yet exist to spend.

 

Rinse and repeat until system breaks and then reset the system rinse and repeat has been the modus operandi for the banksters for centuries

 

If you want a deeper understanding you need to watch this

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's all a massive con.

 

When inflation is high, things go up in price. As inflation reduces, things continue to go up in price, but at a slightly lower rate.

 

Notice how stuff rarely comes back down in price to any acceptable level.

 

In most cases, I do feel that a lot of the 'big corporates' and 'big brands' just use the situation to ramp up their prices just so they can make more profits.

 

Someone mentioned about 'assets increasing in value' but I don't think that's strictly true.

 

My parents bought their house in the 1970s for around £12000, which was a lot of money at the time. If they sold that house now, they could expect to get around £300k.

That sounds like a massive profit, but in reality it isn't, because if they wanted to then buy a similar property, then they'd be paying around £300k. The asset may have increased in value, but is not worth much more now in comparison.

 

 

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On 1/2/2024 at 7:29 PM, Grumpy Owl said:

It's all a massive con.

 

When inflation is high, things go up in price. As inflation reduces, things continue to go up in price, but at a slightly lower rate.

 

Notice how stuff rarely comes back down in price to any acceptable level.

 

In most cases, I do feel that a lot of the 'big corporates' and 'big brands' just use the situation to ramp up their prices just so they can make more profits.

 

Someone mentioned about 'assets increasing in value' but I don't think that's strictly true.

 

My parents bought their house in the 1970s for around £12000, which was a lot of money at the time. If they sold that house now, they could expect to get around £300k.

That sounds like a massive profit, but in reality it isn't, because if they wanted to then buy a similar property, then they'd be paying around £300k. The asset may have increased in value, but is not worth much more now in comparison.

 

 

It's the same with most assets. Lot of folks think they did rather well in stocks. Adjust for inflation i.e. M2 money supply and they haven't risen much.

 

A good visualization of how insane monetary inflation has been is looking at the bitcoin price.  that asset's price function directly correlates most of the time to the M2 chart. And is probably likely why Bush and CIA invented it, as a counter to the money printers.

Edited by Mr H
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3 hours ago, Mr H said:

It's the same with most assets. Lot of folks think they did rather well in stocks. Adjust for inflation i.e. M2 money supply and they haven't risen much.

 

A good visualization of how insane monetary inflation has been is looking at the bitcoin price.  that asset's price function directly correlates most of the time to the M2 chart. And is probably likely why Bush and CIA invented it, as a counter to the money printers.

 

I saw something similar with house prices too: 

 

"The truth is that house prices have been falling for a while. That feels counter-intuitive against what appears to have been a steady climb since the financial crisis of 2008. Inflation, however, has climbed faster, wiping out the gains in real terms. Of course, most of the damage has been done in the past two years. But the picture looks grim across longer timeframes."

 

https://www.fidelity.co.uk/markets-insights/personal-finance/personal-finance/house-prices-did-you-miss-the-16-year-crash/ 

 

Calling it monetary inflation is a bit of dissonance though, because it's really cash depreciation when your cash buys less goods than last year. 

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1 minute ago, Campion said:

 

I saw something similar with house prices too: 

 

"The truth is that house prices have been falling for a while. That feels counter-intuitive against what appears to have been a steady climb since the financial crisis of 2008. Inflation, however, has climbed faster, wiping out the gains in real terms. Of course, most of the damage has been done in the past two years. But the picture looks grim across longer timeframes."

 

https://www.fidelity.co.uk/markets-insights/personal-finance/personal-finance/house-prices-did-you-miss-the-16-year-crash/ 

 

Calling it monetary inflation is a bit of dissonance though, because it's really cash depreciation when your cash buys less goods than last year. 

Yeah. I normally call it simply inflation as per Austrian school of economics definition, but if you just say inflation people think you mean consumer price inflation which is totally different and an effect of inflation.

 

Yes. In UK there are many home owners. So politically it's very clever what they did. Giving the majority of people the illusion every year they are getting richer and hiding the fact they are indeed working longer hours, for less pay every year. Stops folks from revolting. I believe Thatcher purposely pursued this policy first.

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2 minutes ago, Mr H said:

Yeah. I normally call it simply inflation as per Austrian school of economics definition, but if you just say inflation people think you mean consumer price inflation which is totally different and an effect of inflation.

 

Yes. In UK there are many home owners. So politically it's very clever what they did. Giving the majority of people the illusion every year they are getting richer and hiding the fact they are indeed working longer hours, for less pay every year. Stops folks from revolting. I believe Thatcher purposely pursued this policy first.

Also why they desperate and do anything to prop up house prices with stupid schemes and stuff..

 

Housing collapse exposed the bull shit...

 

Long overdue one though 

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Bidens economy is not good.

January 5, 2024 9:18 am by CWR

by AC

Housing is the highest it’s ever been.

Homelessness is the highest it’s ever been.

The spending power of the dollar is the lowest it’s ever been.

 

Illegal immigration at record highs.

Corporate bankruptcy at record highs.

How can anyone honestly think Biden’s economy is doing well?

 

As mortgage rates hit 8% for the first time in 23 years, affordability continues to fall off a cliff.

The Housing Affordability Index just hit a fresh record low, at ~90.

This means that housing affordability is officially down 50% since 2021.

Since then peak in 2012, housing… pic.twitter.com/8LrplZtztq

— The Kobeissi Letter (@KobeissiLetter) October 23, 2023

 

The number of people experiencing chronic homelessness in the U.S. continued to climb in 2023, hitting the highest level for the second year.

 

People who complain about their dollars not going far enough will vote for policies that weaken the spending power of the dollar.

For example: $1 in 1913 is equivalent to $31 today.

Inflation should be thought of as a subtle form of taxation and people should vote with this in… t.co/YCKB2Cxums

— The Rabbit Hole (@TheRabbitHole84) December 29, 2023

 

 

.@SpeakerJohnson at Southern Border: "America is at a breaking point with record levels of illegal immigration…the situation here and across the country is truly unconscionable. We would describe it as both heartbreaking and infuriating…" pic.twitter.com/UgkJ4B6Mre

— CSPAN (@cspan) January 3, 2024

 

 

US corporate bankruptcy are the highest since 2020, per Reuters. pic.twitter.com/98l8gCVK9e

— unusual_whales (@unusual_whales) November 17, 2023

https://citizenwatchreport.com/bidens-economy-is-not-good/

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Uniparty's economy is not good.

 

Fixed that :)

 

The media still wants us to believe that the confectionery they serve us (Biden; Trump etc) in some way represents separate entities. We're still in the same presidency as we were a hundred years ago. The faces change, but the kid-fucking-kompromat machine always pushes the same type of actors to the forefront.

 

People are struggling to accept the inevitable: Centralized power always genocides; if it did not, it could not centralize.

Creating the notion of, and 'electing', 'presidents' is a guaranteed way to ensuring enslavement.

Single-point of failure is always bad structural-engineering. No matter what.

 

Just like Coke and Pepsi are owned by the same people, so is the Uniparty (red/blue team). There is no Biden economy. There is probably no Biden; in the sense of a coherent, identifiable person.

 

Given the contortions of fiat currency, there is probably no economy either; technically. Just the mirage of it.

 

Edited by octoplex
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Maybe I'm an outlier but I think the us economy is looking great. Decent earnings reports, record low jobless claims and record high open jobs, markets near all time highs, GDP looks decent considering geo politics etc...

 

In fact it's doing too well hence the fed had to hike rates so much to try and cool it down..and probably have to manufacture recession...

 

People going homeless not normally regarded as an economic measure and can be explained by other reasons 

Edited by Mr H
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20 minutes ago, Mr H said:

Maybe I'm an outlier but I think the us economy is looking great.

 

Who knows? On a more general point, how do we authenticate any of this data?

 

We have established that the CIA / US legacy-power system is the enemy of humanity.

Mockingbird Media.

Why would they supply us any legitimate data? It's likely all false.

 

On the ground in North America, right now, I can see, out my window, large groups of people smoking crack openly; others are slumped comatose. This is in the downtown core. Walking down the main street here I can count literally hundreds of these ghosts with glass pipes. This is not even a big town.  I think it is hard to appreciate the scale of the ground-war in North America unless you visit.

 

It's difficult to see and really accept.

 

Now, some more detail on these crackheads: Many of them are trauma survivors of the Freemasons and other groups. Essentially they are 'failed' MK-ULTRA recruits. They are self-medicating in the absence of any other support.

 

I speak with them regularly; one of them is all bent-over from the crack, but still has a sparkle in his eye and draws incredible sacred-geometry pictures which he sells on the sidewalk where he lives. Perhaps his addictions and life here are better than the alternative: Being a slave to the Masons and/or other groups who abuse children and create this epidemic of pain and repression.

 

Now, we can simply exclude this demographic from a measurement of the 'economy'; but as a visual metaphor for the stability of the power systems, and in the absence of any other credible data, it looks like a total crash has happened.

 

I have learned to trust my eyes.

 

 

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@octoplex

 

There's definitely a widening wealth gap due to most people not investing in assets so they lose their purchasing power...

 

But if you take the economy as a whole it's pretty strong.

 

In pure economic terms I don't think there are m(any) countries in better positions...

 

Of course everything deliberately based on debt so one of these days the house of cards has to fall. But I think we're some way off that yet.

 

But as I previously said the Fed will likely have to create a recession soon, because the economy is too hot and adding to the inflation problem. So I would expect that, but not the doomsday Armageddon that doomsters want to see. That's quite a few years off still imo.

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5 minutes ago, Mr H said:

Not the doomsday Armageddon that doomsters want to see. That's quite a few years off still imo.

 

I also reject doomsaying.

That said, many North American cities look worse than Armageddon right now.

What use is an 'economy' if it exists only on the teleprompters of newscasters?

 

Edited by octoplex
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Tucker Carlson with Jeffrey Gundlach on fed

Is the Fed lowering rates to get Joe Biden reelected, or is the truth actually much scarier than that? Jeffrey Gundlach explains.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FX447-BLoWo

'Bond King' Jeff Gundlach warns of 'exploding' US debt expenses and a recession coming within the next year. Here's his 6 best quotes from a recent interview

Nov 8, 2023, 6:21 PM GMT

The US's $33 trillion debt mountain is becoming more alarming, and a recession could be coming for the US economy sometime within he next year, according to "Bond King" Jeff Gundlach.

The billionaire and famed fixed income investor pointed to the potential fallout from higher-for-longer interest rates in an interview with Yahoo Finance on Wednesday.

Higher rates have pushed up borrowing costs for the US government, with annualized interest expenses on the US debt surging past $1 trillion last month, according to a Bloomberg analysis.

Here are his six best quotes, lightly edited for length and clarity:

1. US debt interest expenses

"The reason I'm worried about higher-for-longer is something that is already in evidence, but isn't getting enough attention, and that is our fiscal situation. The interest expense on the debt is exploding in a vertical fashion, because all of those bonds that were issued back at 25 to 50 basis points … they're all rolling off, and they're rolling off with great speed."

That's partly because bonds that are paying next to nothing in yields are now approaching maturity. Those will likely be reissued as yields are hovering close to 5%, Gundlach later added.

2. Small business pain

"We have a massive problem we're staring down because of the low interest rates being in place for so many years, almost a decade, and now the Fed being higher-for-longer. This is also happening to small businesses, that used to pay 4% and now they're paying 9% or even 12%, which is obviously another problem if we're higher for longer."

3. Recession is coming.

"My belief is that we're going to be in recession – if we're not already in recession – we'll probably be in recession by the second quarter of 2024."

He later added, "All of our lives have been geared to low interest rates, and now that we understand that higher interest rates have a consequence, I think that this idea that we're going to avoid a recession is really losing steam."

4. Deficits to worsen in recession 

"This fiscal problem is going to get much, much worse in a recession, because of course there's going to be a strong response. There's going to be probably an inflationary response to this fiscal situation."

That could eventually push up the US deficit from 6%-8% of GDP to 9%, Gundlach predicted. A larger deficit could stoke inflation and cause interest rates to tread higher over the second half of 2024, he later added.

5. Debt math near breaking point

"In five years, let's just say we go higher-for-longer, and we have a 6% interest rate, and we have 9% of the deficit be of GDP … 50% of all tax receipts would be going to interest payments. Which of course, is an impossibility, given that 70% of the budget is mandatory spending," Gundlach said, referencing a projection from the Congressional Budget Office.

"We're really getting to that moment, that we've all been, us old timers, have been talking about for decades." Gundlach said. "We're basically at that moment where it's not our grandchildren's problem, it's not our children's problem, it's our problem," he later added.

6. Get out of the Magnificent Seven

"They will obviously be the worst performers in the upcoming recession. Whatever is leading the charge going into the economic downturn invariably must lead the charge on the way down. I would get out of them. I would go to an equal-weighted basket as opposed to a market-weighted basket. I would be moving away from [the] US banking system for sure." 

https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/bonds/bond-king-jeff-gundlach-us-debt-levels-exploding-recession-economy-2023-11?op=1

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When I see criticism or doom mongering that's one-sidedly focused on America (and western Europe to a lesser degree) it starts to smell fishy and like made-up propaganda originating from one of the other power blocks trying to demoralise us. The debt issue does look pretty horrendous right now though, and that is entirely of our governments' own choosing, rather than some abstract theory about economics. 

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2023 layoffs will continue to affect employee morale in 2024, economist says

Published Wed, Jan 3 20243:04 PM EST

2023 was a year of layoffs. Over 305,000 U.S. workers were laid off over the year in a series of mass layoffs that started most notably with tech companies, but then spread across industries.

“Many businesses had to make tough decisions to reduce their headcounts, especially with the economic uncertainty of early 2023,” Aaron Terrazas, chief economist at Glassdoor, tells CNBC Make It. But with the mass layoffs came a drop in employee satisfaction and engagement, and increasing pressure put on middle managers, that Terrazas predicts will persist into 2024

https://www.cnbc.com/2024/01/03/2023-layoffs-will-continue-to-affect-workers-in-2024-report-says.html

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2 minutes ago, Campion said:

When I see criticism or doom mongering that's one-sidedly focused on America (and western Europe to a lesser degree) it starts to smell fishy and like made-up propaganda originating from one of the other power blocks trying to demoralise us. The debt issue does look pretty horrendous right now though, and that is entirely of our governments' own choosing, rather than some abstract theory about economics. 

America's Immigration Daydream Is Coming To An End

by Tyler Durden
Saturday, Nov 04, 2023 - 07:45 PM

Authored by Matthew Boose via American Greatness,

Author David Leonhardt, a regular columnist for the New York Times, confronts – or rather, politely circumambulates – the “unintended” consequences of the landmark 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, which fundamentally remade America’s immigration process by opening the floodgates to the Third World.

Many Americans who grew up during the Kennedy years look back on the post-war boom as an idyllic dream. Their yearnings can’t be written off as mere nostalgia bias. Compared to the present, the early ‘60s must have been like paradise: the single breadwinner was the standard, the country had a real sense of identity, and people trusted their neighbors enough to leave doors unlocked. That’s all gone now. As a result of the monumental demographic change unleashed over the past half century, America is more divided than it has ever been since its greatest crisis in 1865. The country is Balkanizing, and politics have become radical and violent.

Leonhardt is more concerned with how diversity can be exploited by the right than its actual disintegrating effects on society. To liberals, immigration can only be conceived as a problem (if ever) when framed in terms of class. But immigration is not only an economic question, as current events have shown. With the war in Israel, reality has come crashing into the daydream of multiracial utopia. America’s rapidly browning youth is sympathetic to Hamas. It is likely that some Atlantic readers are having doubts about immigration for the first time in their lives. The issue can be avoided for a while longer, but not forever.

https://www.zerohedge.com/political/americas-immigration-daydream-coming-end

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11 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

Many Americans who grew up during the Kennedy years look back on the post-war boom as an idyllic dream. Their yearnings can’t be written off as mere nostalgia bias. Compared to the present, the early ‘60s must have been like paradise: the single breadwinner was the standard, the country had a real sense of identity, and people trusted their neighbors enough to leave doors unlocked. That’s all gone now.

 

I take the point and things have been leading inexorably towards where we are now. When I say 'made up propaganda' I mean that it gives a negative slant without balancing it with the positives and is designed to have a particular effect on us.  There were these demoralisation campaigns going on all through the post-war period (not to mention before) with the cold war, civil rights vs segregation, later the Vietnam war/anti-war  and a lot of intergenerational conflct from the early days of rock & roll in the 50s through to 60s drop-out mentality. It's like someone has been successfully chipping away at our self-confidence and social cohesion for a very long time, and yes it's building up to a crisis stage. Yet at any point along this trajectory, even now, we can still turn things round if we all wake up and decide to turn in a different direction. We can suddenly start having bigger families and end the excuse for any immigration at all if we change our beliefs, but we don't because we feel demoralised. It's mostly a psychological problem in the UK as the indigenous people still make up 75% of the population. 

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4 hours ago, Macnamara said:

Tucker Carlson with Jeffrey Gundlach on fed

Is the Fed lowering rates to get Joe Biden reelected, or is the truth actually much scarier than that? Jeffrey Gundlach explains.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FX447-BLoWo

'Bond King' Jeff Gundlach warns of 'exploding' US debt expenses and a recession coming within the next year. Here's his 6 best quotes from a recent interview

Nov 8, 2023, 6:21 PM GMT

The US's $33 trillion debt mountain is becoming more alarming, and a recession could be coming for the US economy sometime within he next year, according to "Bond King" Jeff Gundlach.

The billionaire and famed fixed income investor pointed to the potential fallout from higher-for-longer interest rates in an interview with Yahoo Finance on Wednesday.

Higher rates have pushed up borrowing costs for the US government, with annualized interest expenses on the US debt surging past $1 trillion last month, according to a Bloomberg analysis.

Here are his six best quotes, lightly edited for length and clarity:

1. US debt interest expenses

"The reason I'm worried about higher-for-longer is something that is already in evidence, but isn't getting enough attention, and that is our fiscal situation. The interest expense on the debt is exploding in a vertical fashion, because all of those bonds that were issued back at 25 to 50 basis points … they're all rolling off, and they're rolling off with great speed."

That's partly because bonds that are paying next to nothing in yields are now approaching maturity. Those will likely be reissued as yields are hovering close to 5%, Gundlach later added.

2. Small business pain

"We have a massive problem we're staring down because of the low interest rates being in place for so many years, almost a decade, and now the Fed being higher-for-longer. This is also happening to small businesses, that used to pay 4% and now they're paying 9% or even 12%, which is obviously another problem if we're higher for longer."

3. Recession is coming.

"My belief is that we're going to be in recession – if we're not already in recession – we'll probably be in recession by the second quarter of 2024."

He later added, "All of our lives have been geared to low interest rates, and now that we understand that higher interest rates have a consequence, I think that this idea that we're going to avoid a recession is really losing steam."

4. Deficits to worsen in recession 

"This fiscal problem is going to get much, much worse in a recession, because of course there's going to be a strong response. There's going to be probably an inflationary response to this fiscal situation."

That could eventually push up the US deficit from 6%-8% of GDP to 9%, Gundlach predicted. A larger deficit could stoke inflation and cause interest rates to tread higher over the second half of 2024, he later added.

5. Debt math near breaking point

"In five years, let's just say we go higher-for-longer, and we have a 6% interest rate, and we have 9% of the deficit be of GDP … 50% of all tax receipts would be going to interest payments. Which of course, is an impossibility, given that 70% of the budget is mandatory spending," Gundlach said, referencing a projection from the Congressional Budget Office.

"We're really getting to that moment, that we've all been, us old timers, have been talking about for decades." Gundlach said. "We're basically at that moment where it's not our grandchildren's problem, it's not our children's problem, it's our problem," he later added.

6. Get out of the Magnificent Seven

"They will obviously be the worst performers in the upcoming recession. Whatever is leading the charge going into the economic downturn invariably must lead the charge on the way down. I would get out of them. I would go to an equal-weighted basket as opposed to a market-weighted basket. I would be moving away from [the] US banking system for sure." 

https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/bonds/bond-king-jeff-gundlach-us-debt-levels-exploding-recession-economy-2023-11?op=1

Pretty outdated. Fed have essentially paused interest rates. Next likely move is to lower them, and this will cause the markets to reverse which is what they because the economy is too hot.

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4 hours ago, Macnamara said:

2023 layoffs will continue to affect employee morale in 2024, economist says

Published Wed, Jan 3 20243:04 PM EST

2023 was a year of layoffs. Over 305,000 U.S. workers were laid off over the year in a series of mass layoffs that started most notably with tech companies, but then spread across industries.

“Many businesses had to make tough decisions to reduce their headcounts, especially with the economic uncertainty of early 2023,” Aaron Terrazas, chief economist at Glassdoor, tells CNBC Make It. But with the mass layoffs came a drop in employee satisfaction and engagement, and increasing pressure put on middle managers, that Terrazas predicts will persist into 2024

https://www.cnbc.com/2024/01/03/2023-layoffs-will-continue-to-affect-workers-in-2024-report-says.html

Unemployment claims continually month after month record lows. Open jobs extremely healthy....

 

Yeah maybe folks were laid off but they obviously got employment somewhere else..

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5 hours ago, Campion said:

When I see criticism or doom mongering that's one-sidedly focused on America (and western Europe to a lesser degree) it starts to smell fishy and like made-up propaganda originating from one of the other power blocks trying to demoralise us. The debt issue does look pretty horrendous right now though, and that is entirely of our governments' own choosing, rather than some abstract theory about economics. 

Indeed. And at some point someone somewhere has to pay the debt or we default...

 

But I am of same opinion as you. The story of Armageddon is a con largely. I think it started after late 1980s crash. Then really took off after 2008 crash....

 

Apart from the psy op side which you say and yet another tool to divide us...

 

It's largely been driven by gold and silver shills praying on people that do not fully understand things..

 

They say literally the same thing every single day for past 15 years. Gullible people have believed them and bought gold. Which hasn't really gone up at all during that time, and silver is half the price it was 10 years ago ....whilst wall street has enjoyed record high after record high.....and pretty much any other asset..

 

Sure if you say the same thing for a long enough time, one day you might be right. Doesn't justify decades of getting totally and utterly wrong....

 

But yeah the way this economic and business cycle has been set up, boom and bust, we need a recession sure, and it might be a bit nasty.....but Armageddon not anytime soon imo.....

 

Then you get people thinking the dollar is going somewhere soon.....it's not going anywhere anytime soon.. despite the Brics blah blah......I will literally roast and eat my own penis if it does.

Edited by Mr H
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