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Millions of Brits to lose landline phone access as deadline set for switch off


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What else are they trying to kill off,don t they realise alot of people still can t get mobile phone signals living in the valleys and mountains..and need landline calls for business etc..

Bunch of morons..

Still only got the old copper wire coming to us which gives half a MB at best got broadband from another source Wi/Fi...

Millions of Brits to lose landline phone access as deadline set for switch off (msn.com)

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There should be more publicity about this, I have become dimly aware of it over the last year but it is hard to get really concrete specific info about what will happen exactly, when and where. It is something which will profoundly affect millions of homes and businesses. 

 

For example, many people still have their internet over the copper wires, even if they have fibre to the cabinet (FTTC). I have read conflicting reports about whether such people's internet will also be cut off at the end of 2025 or if it will go on for years more. If you look on the BT website or other places which purport to tell you 'all you need to know' it turns out they don't really tell you much at all, it's all very vague. 

 

I have FTTC and could get FTTP as it is in my street now. However it would be quite intrusive to get it installed as it needs a wire putting through the garden, a hole drilled in the wall and an engineer coming into the house etc. Not a massive deal maybe but given that my existing internet and phone work adequately to my liking, I have no particular desire to change if I don't have to. When will I absolutely have to? I don't know. I can do without the landline but would like to continue receiving FTTC if possible. 

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There is quite a lot of info circulating about it. Really important that its stopped.

 

https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/save-our-landlines-help-us-maintain-full-access

 

https://www.change.org/p/save-our-landlines-save-lives

 

More info about electrosmog
https://cellphonetaskforce.org/electrosmog-policy-brief/

 

 

 

Edited by northern star
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It's 'things' like this that get lost in the distractions. No wonder they don't stop going on about boats and BS all day. I sometimes wonder, if when things have changed, they might stop going on about a lot of the mindless stuff, when it's too late to save some 'things'. 

 

Also 'they' don't really want 'us' living in the areas that are out of signal?

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1 hour ago, Anti Facts Sir said:

Yep, distract the public with fear porn about collapsing schools, new scariants and travel chaos.

 

Meanwhile, take away the basic, safe method of communication.

 

I wonder if there will be concessions and things in place for the disabled, vulnerable and elderly...like they haven't for the bank closures.

Sadly i think you know the answer to this already.

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I received a letter the other day from my telephone company saying that I would need to upgrade to keep my internet & landline & to ring a certain number which I did, they told me that I would need an engineer to come out & change the socket where my phone plugs into at no cost to me, so I don't know if this has anything to do with them killing off the landlines ???:classic_unsure:

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1 hour ago, alexa said:

I received a letter the other day from my telephone company saying that I would need to upgrade to keep my internet & landline & to ring a certain number which I did, they told me that I would need an engineer to come out & change the socket where my phone plugs into at no cost to me, so I don't know if this has anything to do with them killing off the landlines ???:classic_unsure:

 

Could be, shame they didn't explain it better or you'd already know! My understanding is we will have the ability to keep a 'landline' in a sense, ie. it will run over the internet, and I think we can even keep our old phone numbers. I believe you can plug a phone into the new router they'll provide.

 

Two downsides are that it will no longer work if the power goes out, and also it will be digital which can result in latency, meaning 'natural' conversations you can have over 'old-fashioned' copper wires are no longer possible. If you've ever spoken to someone on the phone nowadays where one of you jumps in at slightly the wrong time, that's why - it's like you're talking to each other via satellite. Copper wires are low latency for telephone calls. So in a sense we're going backwards. 

 

I think this is going to happen though, there is probably no point trying to prevent it, it's a fait accompli. The only question remaining is how long we have left to use the old system. ie. is it late 2025 for everyone, or sooner for some? Could it be extended another 5-10 years? We don't know yet. 

Edited by dirtydog
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13 minutes ago, dirtydog said:

I think this is going to happen though, there is probably no point trying to prevent it, it's a fait accompli. The only question remaining is how long we have left to use the old system. ie. is it late 2025 for everyone, or sooner for some? Could it be extended another 5-10 years? We don't know yet. 

 

What ever the time scale, they'll do it, just be prepared for it.

It's the elderly & the sick who I feel for. 

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2 hours ago, dirtydog said:

 

Could be, shame they didn't explain it better or you'd already know! My understanding is we will have the ability to keep a 'landline' in a sense, ie. it will run over the internet, and I think we can even keep our old phone numbers. I believe you can plug a phone into the new router they'll provide.

 

Two downsides are that it will no longer work if the power goes out, and also it will be digital which can result in latency, meaning 'natural' conversations you can have over 'old-fashioned' copper wires are no longer possible. If you've ever spoken to someone on the phone nowadays where one of you jumps in at slightly the wrong time, that's why - it's like you're talking to each other via satellite. Copper wires are low latency for telephone calls. So in a sense we're going backwards. 

 

I think this is going to happen though, there is probably no point trying to prevent it, it's a fait accompli. The only question remaining is how long we have left to use the old system. ie. is it late 2025 for everyone, or sooner for some? Could it be extended another 5-10 years? We don't know yet. 

 

Disagree. Thats defeatist talk, and exactly what they want.  Technology and computers are great, but relying on them solely without any back up is folly, as they can break down, get hacked or be manipulated by those in control. The latter being exactly what the plan is. Same goes for centralised banking and "smart" this and that. People need to stand up now to prevent it from happening, while we still have the chance. The alternative is a dystopia beyond all nightmares.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, dirtydog said:

There should be more publicity about this, I have become dimly aware of it over the last year but it is hard to get really concrete specific info about what will happen exactly, when and where. It is something which will profoundly affect millions of homes and businesses. 

 

For example, many people still have their internet over the copper wires, even if they have fibre to the cabinet (FTTC). I have read conflicting reports about whether such people's internet will also be cut off at the end of 2025 or if it will go on for years more. If you look on the BT website or other places which purport to tell you 'all you need to know' it turns out they don't really tell you much at all, it's all very vague. 

 

I have FTTC and could get FTTP as it is in my street now. However it would be quite intrusive to get it installed as it needs a wire putting through the garden, a hole drilled in the wall and an engineer coming into the house etc. Not a massive deal maybe but given that my existing internet and phone work adequately to my liking, I have no particular desire to change if I don't have to. When will I absolutely have to? I don't know. I can do without the landline but would like to continue receiving FTTC if possible. 

Of course, what's more important is that analogue phones work during power cuts. Phones attached to your internet router don't. So no way to call for help in an emergency when power is off. Good way to kill off the plebs.

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At work recently, we were forced to change our broadband provider.

 

We already had fibre broadband, but an engineer put in a new wall socket, and we had a brand new router set up.

 

Our existing landline phone connects (via an adapter) to this new router. We can still make and receive calls, to the same number, as we did previously.

 

So I don't think it is true that 'landlines' are being totally killed off, as some people have been making out. It's just the way that the landline is 'connected' that is different.

 

10 hours ago, k_j_evans said:

Of course, what's more important is that analogue phones work during power cuts. Phones attached to your internet router don't. So no way to call for help in an emergency when power is off. Good way to kill off the plebs.

 

But that is still a valid point. If the power goes off, and your router isn't on, then you can't use the phoneline. (If your phone is a cordless type with a powered base unit, that wouldn't work either, even if connected to a copper line!).

 

 

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1 hour ago, Grumpy Owl said:

At work recently, we were forced to change our broadband provider.

 

We already had fibre broadband, but an engineer put in a new wall socket, and we had a brand new router set up.

 

Our existing landline phone connects (via an adapter) to this new router. We can still make and receive calls, to the same number, as we did previously.

 

So I don't think it is true that 'landlines' are being totally killed off, as some people have been making out. It's just the way that the landline is 'connected' that is different.

 

 

But that is still a valid point. If the power goes off, and your router isn't on, then you can't use the phoneline. (If your phone is a cordless type with a powered base unit, that wouldn't work either, even if connected to a copper line!).

 

 

There also tends to be more latency with internet connected phones so call quality is often worse. 

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On 9/5/2023 at 9:03 AM, Observations said:

It's 'things' like this that get lost in the distractions. No wonder they don't stop going on about boats and BS all day. I sometimes wonder, if when things have changed, they might stop going on about a lot of the mindless stuff, when it's too late to save some 'things'. 

 

Also 'they' don't really want 'us' living in the areas that are out of signal?

The control system for everything is internet. They have to make sure to kill off communication outside that realm so as to remain in control and to stop uprisings with equipment that's harder to surveil than govt internet.

Apparently I heard recently that some groups have figured out how to make CB radio a worldwide channel now.  

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On 9/5/2023 at 12:22 PM, dirtydog said:

 

Could be, shame they didn't explain it better or you'd already know! My understanding is we will have the ability to keep a 'landline' in a sense, ie. it will run over the internet, and I think we can even keep our old phone numbers. I believe you can plug a phone into the new router they'll provide.

 

Two downsides are that it will no longer work if the power goes out, and also it will be digital which can result in latency, meaning 'natural' conversations you can have over 'old-fashioned' copper wires are no longer possible. If you've ever spoken to someone on the phone nowadays where one of you jumps in at slightly the wrong time, that's why - it's like you're talking to each other via satellite. Copper wires are low latency for telephone calls. So in a sense we're going backwards. 

 

I think this is going to happen though, there is probably no point trying to prevent it, it's a fait accompli. The only question remaining is how long we have left to use the old system. ie. is it late 2025 for everyone, or sooner for some? Could it be extended another 5-10 years? We don't know yet. 

Also, if its controlled by electric, you have no control. They can turn it off anytime with any excuse.

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Their plan is to make EVERYTHING 'smart' which means wifi enabled

 

wifi is toxic

 

when they make a city 'smart' they are essentially bathing the entire space in toxic wifi radiation

 

the 5G system is being rolled out in order to create 'the cloud' so that all the wifi enabled (smart) products can send their data directly to the cloud

 

An artificial intelligence will then process that data. From the data sent by all your 'smart' devices the AI will be able to access your ENERGY USEAGE. EVERYTHING will be made 'smart' down to your toothbrush and bed frame.

 

Your energy useage will be rationed so if your energy useage goes over your allotted amount it will be cut off.

 

Your personal allowance of energy will be determined by your social credit score. Your social credit score will be determined by how much THEY like you.

 

The excuse they will give for micro-managing your energy use is that they are 'combatting climate change' by achieving 'net zero' CO2 production

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3 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

the 5G system is being rolled out in order to create 'the cloud' so that all the wifi enabled (smart) products can send their data directly to the cloud

Is your TV spying on YOU? It sounds like science fiction but many new TVs can watch you - telling advertisers your favourite shows or even filming you on the sofa. And there's no off switch!

By Guy Adams for the Daily Mail

Updated: 09:37 BST, 26 November 2013

You are sitting in bed in your pyjamas, drinking a cup of cocoa. A loved one lies next to you, watching late-night television. Pillow talk is exchanged. An alarm clock is set. Eventually the lights are turned out.

Earlier, you sat on the living-room sofa eating supper, before loading the dishwasher and heading upstairs.

You have, in other words, just enjoyed a perfectly normal night, in a perfectly normal home. The curtains are drawn, the central heating turned up. It’s cosy, relaxing and, above all, completely private. Or so you thought.

The truth turns out to be quite the opposite. For on the other side of the world, people you didn’t know existed are keeping a beady eye on your every move.

These characters can see what clothes you have been wearing and what food you’ve eaten. They heard every word you said, and logged every TV show you watched. Some are criminals, others work for major corporations. And now they know your most intimate secrets.

It may sound like a plot summary for a futuristic science-fiction movie. But real-life versions of this Orwellian scenario are being played out every day in towns and cities across the globe — and in most cases the victims have no idea.

At fault is a common electronic device invented nearly a century ago and found in almost every modern household: the domestic television set.

Put simply, our TVs have started spying on us.

Last week, there was a high-profile case in point. An IT consultant called Jason Huntley, who lives in a village near Hull, uncovered evidence that a flat-screen television, which had been sitting in his living room since the summer, was secretly invading his family’s privacy.

He began investigating the £400 LG device after noticing that its home screen appeared to be showing him ‘targeted’ adverts — for cars, and Knorr stock cubes — based on programmes he’d just been watching.

Huntley decided to monitor information that the so-called smart TV — which connects to the internet — was sending and receiving. He did this by using his laptop effectively as a bridge between his television and the internet receiver, so the laptop was able to show all the data being sucked out of his set.

He soon discovered that details of not just every show he watched but every button he pressed on his remote control were being sent back to LG’s corporate headquarters  in South Korea.

There, the electronics company appeared to be using its customers’ data to make money. A promotional video shown to commercial clients suggested that data was being used to provide ‘the ad experience you have always dreamed of’.

The information Huntley’s TV had sent — without his knowledge — included the contents of his private digital video collection, which he’d watched on the television. This included camcorder footage of family celebrations containing images of his wife and two young children.

Most worrying of all, the device continued sending such information to Korea even after Huntley had adjusted the television’s default settings to ‘opt out’ of data sharing.

Huntley wrote about the findings on his blog. After his case was picked up by mainstream news outlets, LG announced an investigation. ‘Customer privacy is a top priority,’ the firm said. ‘We are looking into reports that certain viewing information on LG smart TVs was shared without consent.’

LG has also removed its promotional video about targeted advertising from its website.

The Information Commissioner’s Office says it is now investigating the firm for a ‘possible breach’ of the Data Protection Act. Jason Huntley, meanwhile, tells me he is ‘very suspicious and also a little worried’ by the affair.

‘I don’t think we’ve heard the last of this. Who knows what else these televisions are doing that we don’t know about?’

It doesn’t take much digging to find out. Talk to any IT security expert and they will tell you that Huntley’s discovery is probably the tip of the iceberg.

What’s to blame is the continuing rise of smart televisions, which account for most new TV sets sold and are predicted to be in more than half of British homes by 2016. These high-tech devices differ from traditional televisions in that they are not just passive boxes that receive a signal and transfer it to a backlit screen.

Instead, they are essentially computers that connect to the internet — and so also send information back the other way.

In theory, this can be extremely useful. For example, many smart TVs have shopping ‘apps’ to access Amazon. They connect to iTunes. They allow us to watch YouTube, instantly download films via Netflix, stream BBC shows on iPlayer, and talk to friends using the video phone link Skype.

But in practice, like almost every type of computer, they can be all-too-easily hacked. And unlike PCs, almost all of which have fairly good anti-virus ‘firewalls’, smart TVs have little or no such software.
Indeed, most have been designed so that outside software — including anti-virus programmes — can never be installed.

This year, Luigi Auriemma, an IT security researcher and computer programmer from Malta, demonstrated the risks that these devices pose when he showed it was possible to hack into several types of Samsung smart television.

After accessing the devices via the internet, Auriemma was able to control them: turning the TVs off and on, and secretly accessing data they held about a user’s viewing habits.

Had he been a criminal, he could also have obtained details of the credit cards that users had uploaded to access pay-per-view TV, download films or use  shopping apps.

Other experts recently made the chilling discovery that it is possible to remotely access the video cameras built into the front of thousands of smart televisions, and spy on the users in their own home.

One such expert is Kurt Stammberger, who works for the IT security firm Mocana. He says the company was recently asked by a television manufacturer to do ‘penetration tests’ on its devices.
‘We weren’t just able to find out what someone was watching, and had watched,’ he says. ‘We could also install “spyware” that could, if they had a video camera, allow us to see through that camera — without even activating the little light that indicates it’s on.

‘It was a fairly straightforward thing to do. People who work in IT often place tape over their computer’s camera lens [in a laptop they are usually set into the inside of the lid] unless they want to actually use it, because it’s so common to hack them. We should all do the same with smart TVs.’

Such an attack, which Stammberger describes as ‘frighteningly easy’ to mount, could provide voyeuristic hackers with a chance to snoop on unsuspecting home-owners in their living rooms or bedrooms.

You have only to witness the extraordinary success of the critically acclaimed Channel 4 show Gogglebox, in which consenting families allow the viewing public to watch them watching television, to appreciate how enticing that prospect could be.

More commercially minded hackers could use such an attack to steal commercial secrets. It could even be used to spy on foreign powers.

‘It’s a serious prospect and I would be very surprised if the Government ever puts in a big order for TVs from, for example, a Chinese manufacturer such as Huawei,’ adds Stammberger, referring to the giant corporation that has been banned in America because of fears over espionage.

‘But supply chains these days are so long and so complex that it’s very rare to buy an electronic device that doesn’t have some sort of Chinese component in it.’

Gangs based largely in Eastern Europe and Russia, meanwhile, are already using so-called ‘data-mining’ programmes to trawl the internet looking for smart TVs in which owners have entered their credit card details. A single search can yield thousands of results.

According to Roger Grimes, who has written eight books on IT security and worked in the field for 28 years, the gangs then sell lists of hacked credit card numbers to fellow criminals.

Card details that were obtained within the past 24 hours sell for around £2.20 each. Older ones are cheaper because there is more chance the cards could have been changed or stopped.

‘What we are starting to see now is really just a foretaste of what’s going to be happening in the next couple of decades,’ says Grimes.

‘Thanks firstly to mobile devices, and now smart TVs, we are entering a brave new world where there will be computers everywhere. Bad guys will take advantage of that.’

And we may not even be safe in our own living rooms.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2513592/Is-TV-spying-YOU.html

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Is your smart speaker SPYING on you? They are the year's must-have presents but privacy campaigners fear 'connected' gizmos are actually highly efficient surveillance devices

  • Christine Sullivan was stabbed to death alongside Jenna Pelegrini in the U.S. 
  • At first glance there was no witness, but an Amazon Echo was in the kitchen 
  • A judge ordered Amazon to turn in any voice recordings made at the time

By Sian Boyle for the Daily Mail

Updated: 02:26 BST, 24 December 2018

At first glance, there was no witness to the grisly murder of Christine Sullivan, who was stabbed to death alongside a friend, Jenna Pellegrini, at her home in rural New Hampshire in the U.S. last year.

But as detectives searched the secluded colonial-style home and its tree-lined garden, they came to realise that a big clue was staring them in the face.

For on the kitchen worktop was an Amazon Echo, one of the increasingly ubiquitous ‘smart speakers’ that can perform a host of household tasks, from checking the weather and playing music to creating shopping lists and looking up recipes.

Such devices follow a user’s spoken commands, so are almost always listening out for fresh orders. What’s more, this one was likely to have been within earshot of Sullivan’s cold-blooded killing, and could be the first-hand witness police were looking for.

That was the theory, at least. So last month, a judge hearing the trial of Sullivan’s alleged killer, a former housemate called Timothy Verrill, ordered Amazon to turn over any voice recordings that the Echo made between January 27, 2017, when the women were murdered, and January 29, when their bodies were found. Prosecutors now hope they might be able to prove Verrill’s guilt. The defendant, who protests his innocence, presumably hopes otherwise.

Whatever the outcome, the whole thing provides a stark illustration of a strange (and some might say chilling) new truth: that the high-tech gadgets, increasingly part of our daily existence, also happen to be highly efficient surveillance devices.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6525861/Is-smart-speaker-SPYING-you.html

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Is YOUR phone spying on you? Technique records Wi-Fi signals used by mobiles to track ‘entire populations’

  • The new system can track you based on the Wi-Fi you connect to
  • When two users connect at similar times it suggests they are together
  • Android users are particularly susceptible, as the majority of the applications available in Google Play Store has access to Wi-Fi information

By Shivali Best For Mailonline

Updated: 22:56 BST, 18 October 2016

While connecting to the Wi-Fi might seem like a good way to save precious data, you might want to think twice before logging on.

A new system has been designed that uses Wi-Fi signals to track where you are and who you're with.

The system reveals that many external applications have access to this sensitive information, which could be seen as an 'erosion of privacy'.

Researchers from the Technical University of Denmark devised the new system, which they say could be used to spy on people.

In their paper, the researchers, led by Piotr Sapiezynski, write: 'The idea of exploiting Wi-Fi signals for this purpose is not new.

'However, to our best knowledge, researchers have not yet tested this approach in practice, over a long period, and in a large population that interacts in various environments.'

'WiFi can be efficiently used for high-resolution mobility tracking of entire populations… and infer who people interact with, not only where they are,' they added

In their study, the system tracked 800 participants by studying which Wi-Fi networks they connected to, and when, to slowly piece together their movements.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3848222/Is-phone-spying-Technique-records-Wi-Fi-signals-used-mobiles-track-entire-populations.html

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6 hours ago, Anti Facts Sir said:

I wonder if this is what all the endless digging up of roads and pavements is about. Installing a totally new communications network to replace the existing one, and not just making your broadband faster so the porn sites don't buffer so much.

 

They have to make the broadband faster so they can fill more web pages and apps with adverts and trackers.

 

 

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18 hours ago, Macnamara said:

Is your TV spying on YOU? It sounds like science fiction but many new TVs can watch you - telling advertisers your favourite shows or even filming you on the sofa. And there's no off switch!

By Guy Adams for the Daily Mail

Updated: 09:37 BST, 26 November 2013

You are sitting in bed in your pyjamas, drinking a cup of cocoa. A loved one lies next to you, watching late-night television. Pillow talk is exchanged. An alarm clock is set. Eventually the lights are turned out.

Earlier, you sat on the living-room sofa eating supper, before loading the dishwasher and heading upstairs.

You have, in other words, just enjoyed a perfectly normal night, in a perfectly normal home. The curtains are drawn, the central heating turned up. It’s cosy, relaxing and, above all, completely private. Or so you thought.

The truth turns out to be quite the opposite. For on the other side of the world, people you didn’t know existed are keeping a beady eye on your every move.

These characters can see what clothes you have been wearing and what food you’ve eaten. They heard every word you said, and logged every TV show you watched. Some are criminals, others work for major corporations. And now they know your most intimate secrets.

It may sound like a plot summary for a futuristic science-fiction movie. But real-life versions of this Orwellian scenario are being played out every day in towns and cities across the globe — and in most cases the victims have no idea.

At fault is a common electronic device invented nearly a century ago and found in almost every modern household: the domestic television set.

Put simply, our TVs have started spying on us.

Last week, there was a high-profile case in point. An IT consultant called Jason Huntley, who lives in a village near Hull, uncovered evidence that a flat-screen television, which had been sitting in his living room since the summer, was secretly invading his family’s privacy.

He began investigating the £400 LG device after noticing that its home screen appeared to be showing him ‘targeted’ adverts — for cars, and Knorr stock cubes — based on programmes he’d just been watching.

Huntley decided to monitor information that the so-called smart TV — which connects to the internet — was sending and receiving. He did this by using his laptop effectively as a bridge between his television and the internet receiver, so the laptop was able to show all the data being sucked out of his set.

He soon discovered that details of not just every show he watched but every button he pressed on his remote control were being sent back to LG’s corporate headquarters  in South Korea.

There, the electronics company appeared to be using its customers’ data to make money. A promotional video shown to commercial clients suggested that data was being used to provide ‘the ad experience you have always dreamed of’.

The information Huntley’s TV had sent — without his knowledge — included the contents of his private digital video collection, which he’d watched on the television. This included camcorder footage of family celebrations containing images of his wife and two young children.

Most worrying of all, the device continued sending such information to Korea even after Huntley had adjusted the television’s default settings to ‘opt out’ of data sharing.

Huntley wrote about the findings on his blog. After his case was picked up by mainstream news outlets, LG announced an investigation. ‘Customer privacy is a top priority,’ the firm said. ‘We are looking into reports that certain viewing information on LG smart TVs was shared without consent.’

LG has also removed its promotional video about targeted advertising from its website.

The Information Commissioner’s Office says it is now investigating the firm for a ‘possible breach’ of the Data Protection Act. Jason Huntley, meanwhile, tells me he is ‘very suspicious and also a little worried’ by the affair.

‘I don’t think we’ve heard the last of this. Who knows what else these televisions are doing that we don’t know about?’

It doesn’t take much digging to find out. Talk to any IT security expert and they will tell you that Huntley’s discovery is probably the tip of the iceberg.

What’s to blame is the continuing rise of smart televisions, which account for most new TV sets sold and are predicted to be in more than half of British homes by 2016. These high-tech devices differ from traditional televisions in that they are not just passive boxes that receive a signal and transfer it to a backlit screen.

Instead, they are essentially computers that connect to the internet — and so also send information back the other way.

In theory, this can be extremely useful. For example, many smart TVs have shopping ‘apps’ to access Amazon. They connect to iTunes. They allow us to watch YouTube, instantly download films via Netflix, stream BBC shows on iPlayer, and talk to friends using the video phone link Skype.

But in practice, like almost every type of computer, they can be all-too-easily hacked. And unlike PCs, almost all of which have fairly good anti-virus ‘firewalls’, smart TVs have little or no such software.
Indeed, most have been designed so that outside software — including anti-virus programmes — can never be installed.

This year, Luigi Auriemma, an IT security researcher and computer programmer from Malta, demonstrated the risks that these devices pose when he showed it was possible to hack into several types of Samsung smart television.

After accessing the devices via the internet, Auriemma was able to control them: turning the TVs off and on, and secretly accessing data they held about a user’s viewing habits.

Had he been a criminal, he could also have obtained details of the credit cards that users had uploaded to access pay-per-view TV, download films or use  shopping apps.

Other experts recently made the chilling discovery that it is possible to remotely access the video cameras built into the front of thousands of smart televisions, and spy on the users in their own home.

One such expert is Kurt Stammberger, who works for the IT security firm Mocana. He says the company was recently asked by a television manufacturer to do ‘penetration tests’ on its devices.
‘We weren’t just able to find out what someone was watching, and had watched,’ he says. ‘We could also install “spyware” that could, if they had a video camera, allow us to see through that camera — without even activating the little light that indicates it’s on.

‘It was a fairly straightforward thing to do. People who work in IT often place tape over their computer’s camera lens [in a laptop they are usually set into the inside of the lid] unless they want to actually use it, because it’s so common to hack them. We should all do the same with smart TVs.’

Such an attack, which Stammberger describes as ‘frighteningly easy’ to mount, could provide voyeuristic hackers with a chance to snoop on unsuspecting home-owners in their living rooms or bedrooms.

You have only to witness the extraordinary success of the critically acclaimed Channel 4 show Gogglebox, in which consenting families allow the viewing public to watch them watching television, to appreciate how enticing that prospect could be.

More commercially minded hackers could use such an attack to steal commercial secrets. It could even be used to spy on foreign powers.

‘It’s a serious prospect and I would be very surprised if the Government ever puts in a big order for TVs from, for example, a Chinese manufacturer such as Huawei,’ adds Stammberger, referring to the giant corporation that has been banned in America because of fears over espionage.

‘But supply chains these days are so long and so complex that it’s very rare to buy an electronic device that doesn’t have some sort of Chinese component in it.’

Gangs based largely in Eastern Europe and Russia, meanwhile, are already using so-called ‘data-mining’ programmes to trawl the internet looking for smart TVs in which owners have entered their credit card details. A single search can yield thousands of results.

According to Roger Grimes, who has written eight books on IT security and worked in the field for 28 years, the gangs then sell lists of hacked credit card numbers to fellow criminals.

Card details that were obtained within the past 24 hours sell for around £2.20 each. Older ones are cheaper because there is more chance the cards could have been changed or stopped.

‘What we are starting to see now is really just a foretaste of what’s going to be happening in the next couple of decades,’ says Grimes.

‘Thanks firstly to mobile devices, and now smart TVs, we are entering a brave new world where there will be computers everywhere. Bad guys will take advantage of that.’

And we may not even be safe in our own living rooms.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2513592/Is-TV-spying-YOU.html

A "Brave New World" indeed. Little bit of programming there too. 

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On 9/6/2023 at 10:26 AM, k_j_evans said:

Of course, what's more important is that analogue phones work during power cuts. Phones attached to your internet router don't. So no way to call for help in an emergency when power is off. Good way to kill off the plebs.

 

That is the key point. They are safety critical in a sense. Mobile networks do have backup power, but signals can be patchy.

 

May be we should get CB Radios and a sense of trucker community.

 

 

Edited by Mikhail Liebestein
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