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these e-bike deaths are becoming frequent all of a sudden


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Teen on e-bike dies after being followed by police in Salford

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Tributes left for the teenage boy at the scene

By Nick Garnett and Michael Sheils McNamee
in Salford and London
 

A teenage boy who was riding an electric bike has died after he was followed by police and then collided with a parked ambulance in Salford.

Greater Manchester Police (GMP) said traffic officers had followed the 15-year-old until their police vehicle's path was blocked by bollards.

The boy then rode on and collided with a stationary ambulance with crew inside, North West Ambulance said.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) is investigating.

At about 14:00 BST, the boy was followed by police officers along Fitzwarren Street and onto Lower Seedley Road, where bollards blocked the police vehicle's way.

He then collided with the ambulance parked in Langworthy Road.

Ambulance crew inside were able to treat him immediately before taking him to hospital where he later died, the North West Ambulance Trust said.

The mood near to the scene of the crash was sombre on Thursday evening, with the family of the boy understood to live nearby.

Flowers, candles and cards have been left at the scene beside a framed picture of the young boy.

One tribute attached to a bunch of roses read: "Doesn't feel real writing this card. My heart is broken."

Another said: "You will always have a special place in my heart, I love you loads my dude."

Langworthy Road is a busy main road and would have had a lot of traffic on it at the time of the collision.

A police cordon in place there for much of the evening has now been lifted.

In a statement, GMP said the IOPC was now leading the investigation.

"Our thoughts are with the family and friends of the boy who tragically died," it said.

The IOPC, which oversees police conduct, said it was "independently investigating the circumstances of a serious collision involving an e-bike and an ambulance in Salford".

"Our thoughts are with his family and loved ones, as well as all those affected by this tragedy," its spokesman said.

"We were notified by Greater Manchester Police due to the fact a police vehicle had been following the e-bike shortly before the collision.

"We have sent investigators to the scene of the collision, at the junction of Langworthy Road and Lower Seedley Road, as well as to the police post-incident procedures, to begin gathering evidence."

He added the IOPC would provide "further details once we are in a position to do so".

Last month, 15-year-old Harvey Evans and 16-year-old Kyrees Sullivan were killed in an e-bike collision in Cardiff after being followed by a police van. Their deaths sparked a riot in the area.

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Right, so the kid didn't die because he was being followed by police. He rode into an area which was cut off to vehicle traffic with bollards and didn't look where he was going.

 

"Person dies because they didn't look where they were going, and were travelling too fast" doesn't have quite the same ring.

 

I'm not going to defend the fuzz, but there does seem a quite obvious/blatant anti-Police thing going on in the media.

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8 minutes ago, Anti Facts Sir said:

Right, so the kid didn't die because he was being followed by police. He rode into an area which was cut off to vehicle traffic with bollards and didn't look where he was going.

 

"Person dies because they didn't look where they were going, and were travelling too fast" doesn't have quite the same ring.

 

I'm not going to defend the fuzz, but there does seem a quite obvious/blatant anti-Police thing going on in the media.

the ambulance that he hit was stationary at the time on the opposite side of the road..seems abit far fetched to me

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another ebike cyclist killed

 

E-bike cyclist dies after hitting pedestrian in Preston

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    2 days ago
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Skeffington Road and Ribbleton Lane junctionIMAGE SOURCE,GOOGLE Image caption,

The boy was hit as he crossed the road at Skeffington Road and Ribbleton Lane

An electric bike cyclist has died after colliding with a pedestrian.

The bike rider, a man in his 30s from Preston, died in hospital after suffering a serious head injury in the crash just after 18:30 BST on Sunday.

A 16-year-old boy suffered a broken leg and internal injuries after being hit as he crossed the road at Skeffington Road and Ribbleton Lane.

The cyclist had been riding a Kona mountain bike modified to be an e-bike, Lancashire Police said.

Police appealed to anyone who witnessed the crash to contact them.

 

 

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hmmm...thought there was an agenda coming...control freaks want to restrict e-bikers now

https://www.coventrytelegraph.net/news/coventry-news/e-bike-users-putting-people-27073886

 

E-bike incidents are putting people off visiting Coventry city centre, according to a local business group. Areas for walkers are being "infiltrated" by e-bike riders and coming into contact with vulnerable road users more often, the group said.

It's part of rising concern over riders of the high-tech cycles - and Coventry city council is planning a crackdown as a result.

Lyndsay Smith, Deputy Manager of Coventry's Business Improvement District (BID) highlighted e-bikes as a "growing issue."

READ MORE: Bike seized in Coventry and destroyed by police amid concerns over anti-social off-road bikers

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26K
 
 
Crowds celebrate in central Kherson days after liberation
 
 
 

She was responding for the group to council plans for a new public space protection order which aims to reduce anti-social behaviour in the centre.

She wrote: "The past year has seen a rise in the number of e-bikes within the city centre, especially as they are used as a mode of transport for companies who deliver food orders for our hospitality businesses. This has resulted in pedestrianised areas being infiltrated by e-bike riders.

 

"Interactions between cyclists and other vulnerable road users in shared spaces are increasing and it’s a high priority for the BID to support any measures that can be put into place to reduce risk of injury.

"We work to make the city centre accessible to all visitors and it has been highlighted that e-bike incidents heavily contribute to the reasons why some of Coventry’s residents feel reluctant to visit the city centre to shop."

 

Ms Smith added: "We note and have been consulted with regards to the proposals by Coventry City Council and West Midlands Police to address the growing issue of e-bikes in the City Centre.

"We support the measures being taken and hope that they are successful and see a change in behaviours of those using ebikes in the City Centre.

"We support the renewal of the existing order but would ask that the situation with regards to e-bike usage in the City Centre is monitored and acted on as appropriate."

Street Enforcement Manager Simon Hutt, who manages the council's enforcement officers in the city centre, said dealing with bikes "isn't easy."

"There are some practical difficulties with enforcing aspects of the order," he wrote.

"Such as the recent increase in e-bikes in the city centre, considering officers on foot trying to engage with bikes travelling at considerable speed isn’t easy, but we are working closely with police colleagues and others within the council to address this."

A new three-year public space protection order for the city centre is due to come into force next week, if it is approved by the council's Cabinet.

 

 

 
Edited by masonfreeparty2
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They are like wasps in Birmingham city centre; dozens of brightly coloured jackets weaving through pedestrians on pavements and ignoring red lights when they do bother to use the actual roads.

 

Just Eat, Deliveroo, Macdonald's and various pizza companies all delivering junk food with not a white rider amongst them. Presumably, they are getting paid an absolute pittance and such jobs are only attractive to asylum types.

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4 hours ago, Saved said:

They are like wasps in Birmingham city centre; dozens of brightly coloured jackets weaving through pedestrians on pavements and ignoring red lights when they do bother to use the actual roads.

 

Just Eat, Deliveroo, Macdonald's and various pizza companies all delivering junk food with not a white rider amongst them. Presumably, they are getting paid an absolute pittance and such jobs are only attractive to asylum types.

we have them just eat riders in my town but seem to always use the roads correctly..never been a problem here.Actually being an ebike rider myself i find them alot safer with the throttle option..gives you that little bit of acceleration to dodge the idiots in cars

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As an e-bike rider myself, I ask what type of e-bikes were being ridden in these accidents. E-bikes range from those that will assist you up to around 15 MPH to those that go 70 MPH+ and anything in between. Mine is limited to 15 MPH (as standard), but by simply disconnecting a connector in the control box (bypassing the speed limiter), it flies along at a breakneck speed. To note, I tried this once and not on the public highway.
I notice one of the accidents involved a modified (normal) bike. I wonder if they modified things like the brakes,  they dont usually.
In my opinion, the police have not been strict enough in enforcing the law. Every day I see people on e-bikes and scooters on the road going crazy speeds with no:

Helmets

Training

License

Insurance

Road tax

MOT

Three weeks ago, a young lad (19) from work hit a car head-on while riding his e-scooter on the road, hitting a speed hump way too fast. He’s lucky he survived but will be blind in one eye, partially deaf in both ears, and may never walk again. Oh, and an arm smashed in 4 places. Think how the driver of the car must feel.

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something really odd about this..usual fake facebook profiles connected to the victim ..oh and look victims sister posts this,if you google map the bike shop it comes up as culcheth car spares,same white car parked outside

 

Edited by masonfreeparty2
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On 6/9/2023 at 12:20 AM, masonfreeparty2 said:

this dont make any sense...flowers left at bollards and not at the crash scene?

57a66c08d4ec8e17ab52313a65d2f0d8.webp

 basically the story is total bullshit...if you google street map of langworthy rd where the accident took place you will see that the above photo is not langworthy rd

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E-bikes: What are the current laws in the UK?

 
 
Ellen Manning
Fri, 9 June 2023 at 10:08 am BST
 
 
E-bike battery in the heat of the sun
 
Are e-bikes legal in the UK and where can you ride them? (Stock image: Getty)

An investigation is underway after a 15-year-old boy who was riding an e-bike died after being followed by police in Salford.

Greater Manchester Police (GMP) said officers were following the boy on Thursday afternoon when it went through bollards that stopped the police vehicle from going any further.

The bike collided with an ambulance shortly after, and the 15-year-old died. It has been reported the ambulance was parked at the time.

A GMP spokesperson said: "In line with normal proceedings, the incident has been referred to the Independent Office for Police Conduct, who are now leading the investigation."

The incident comes just weeks after an e-bike crash in Cardiff involving two boys who were being followed by police sparked riots in the city.

Are e-bikes legal on UK roads?

According to the government website, you can ride an electric bike if you are 14 or over, as long as it meets certain requirements.

It says to ride ‘electrically assisted pedal cycles’ (EAPCs) you don't need a licence and the bike doesn't need to be registered, taxed or insured.

An EAPC must have pedals that can be used to propel it, it says, which means the pedals must be in motion for the electric assistance to be provided.

It must show either the power output or the manufacturer of the motor, as well as either the battery’s voltage or the maximum speed of the bike.

Watch: Police force refers itself to watchdog as CCTV footage shows van following e-bike before crash

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CCTV shows police vehicle following bike ahead of fatal crash in Cardiff
Scroll back up to restore default view.

The bike's motor must have a maximum power output of 250 watts and shouldn't be able to propel the bike when it’s travelling more than 15.5mph, government regulations state.

Any electric bike that doesn't meet these rules is classed as a motorcycle or moped and needs to be registered and taxed, and the person riding it needs a driving licence and must wear a crash helmet.

In addition, the government website says some e-bikes must be 'type approved' - this is if they can be propelled without pedalling, or if they don't meet EAPC rules.

If a bike has been type approved, it will have a plate showing its type approval number, and this should have been done by the manufacturer or importer before someone buys the bike.

Where can you ride an e-bike?

If a bike meets the EAPC requirements it is classed as a normal pedal bike, the government website says.

This means you can ride it on private and public property, including cycle paths and anywhere that a standard bicycle is allowed.

Modern electric rental bikes lined up during charging on a sunny day, identified by number, brick building in background.
 
Electric bikes are growing in popularity - both to own and rent. (Stock image: Getty)

What is the legal speed limit for electric bikes in the UK?

E-bikes are subject to the same rules as bikes, and technically road speed limits don't apply to bicycles.

This means that in theory there is no speed limit for e-bikes in the UK. However, the electric assistance has to cut off at 15.5mph, so beyond that you can only go as fast as you can pedal.

Are there different levels of power for e-bikes?

There are different options for power when it comes to e-bikes - including 250 watts, 350 watts, 500 watts, and 750 watts.

However, in the UK only 250 watt e-bikes are permitted, so more powerful e-bikes would not be legal.

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On 6/9/2023 at 12:24 AM, Anti Facts Sir said:

 

I'm not going to defend the fuzz, but there does seem a quite obvious/blatant anti-Police thing going on in the media.

 

May be they in the media want temporary anarchy to then usher in a crackdown.

 

"Sorry the police just don't work anymore, so we are now deploying these robotic AI police."

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Yes, it is a strange story, certainly to hit a stationary vehicle and then die from his injuries, the cyclist must have collided at some speed.

 

(Perhaps if he had been wearing a helmet he might have been less-badly injured?)

 

Anyway you can see from the news articles, there seems to be an agenda to introduce 'new' legislation concerning e-bikes.

 

But there's no need. Same as with e-scooters, both are motorised two wheel vehicles (bicycles).

 

Motorised bicycle = "motorbike".

 

Simple really, classify these e-bikes and e-scooters as motorcycles, then there is legislation and regulations already in effect.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Grumpy Owl said:

Yes, it is a strange story, certainly to hit a stationary vehicle and then die from his injuries, the cyclist must have collided at some speed.

 

(Perhaps if he had been wearing a helmet he might have been less-badly injured?)

 

Anyway you can see from the news articles, there seems to be an agenda to introduce 'new' legislation concerning e-bikes.

 

But there's no need. Same as with e-scooters, both are motorised two wheel vehicles (bicycles).

 

Motorised bicycle = "motorbike".

 

Simple really, classify these e-bikes and e-scooters as motorcycles, then there is legislation and regulations already in effect.

 

 

i would class anything over 250w a motorised vehicle...a 15mph limit for the 250w ebikes isnt going to kill anyone unless very unlucky and thats just part of life,shit happens occasionally.Last night i saw an ebike doing about 25mph up a steep hill near me without peddling..looked more like an electric moped than a bike.Anyway if they do bring in legislation for all ebikes the police are going to have their work cut out identifying these ebikes with  built in frame batteries although the motor in the wheel is a giveaway.At the end of the day its a few idiots/criminals that are doing the damage and maybe the police should get out of their cars and ride ebikes themselves to catch them and leave off the easy target motorist..although i received a letter recently for having no car insurance which i genuinely forgot to update..now was it because my car number plate was seen by a stationary camera or by a police car? i was justed warned to get insurance..normally if id have been pulled up my car would have been impounded.

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here we go...what a surprise!

 

E-bikes need number plates and insurance, say MPs and industry

 
 
Gwyn Wright
Sun, 11 June 2023 at 11:21 am BST
 
 
Saul Cookson   (PA Media)
 
Saul Cookson (PA Media)

Electric bikes must have number plates and insurance in order for pedestrians to be safe, Conservative MPs and industry insiders have said.

They want them to be regulated in the same way as other vehicles given the damage they can do if they hit someone.

E-bikes can weigh twice as much as a conventional bicycle and, while most cannot travel faster than 15.5mph by law, some have been modified to go much faster.

Children are allowed to ride them from the age of 14.

 

Ian Stewart, chairman of the Commons Transport Select Committee, told the Mail on Sunday: “There is a case for looking at insurance arrangements.

“I don’t think the regulations are a good fit for new technologies.

“It’s not just e-bikes, there are issues with e-scooters and driver-assist/self-driving technology increasingly embedded in cars.”

Fellow committee member Greg Smith told the newspaper: “With more types of vehicle competing for road space, it is only fair that all users are treated equally.

“E-bikes and e-scooters can achieve considerable speeds and cause damage to other vehicles and injure people, so should have to carry the same insurance requirements and tax liabilities as users of motor cars.”

Tony Campbell, chief executive of the Motor Cycle Industry Association, which represents the sector, called for new laws to include anti-tampering measures to outlaw e-bikes being modified for faster speeds, telling the paper: “We are in favour of reviewing regulation as it is clear it is outdated.”

The calls come after Saul Cookson, 15, died when his e-bike crashed into an ambulance shortly after being followed by police in Salford, Greater Manchester, on Thursday.

Last month, Kyrees Sullivan, 16, and Harvey Evans, 15, were killed in Cardiff when riding a Sur-Ron electric bicycle through the Ely area of the city.

Claims they were being pursued by police sparked a riot in the area.

The potential danger of e-bikes were raised in a court case in 2020 following the death of 56-year-old pedestrian Sakine Cihan in August 2018, after she was knocked down and killed by a rider in Dalston, east London.

Thomas Hanlon was bought before the Old Bailey accused of causing her death by careless driving in what was believed to be the first case of its kind, but was cleared by a jury.

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i can see the lack of decent brakes on e bikes being a problem, most of them seem to be very anaemic compared to motor bikes.  some of the fast ones look to have very small wheels as well, they seem to be an accident waiting to happen.

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32 minutes ago, eddy64 said:

i can see the lack of decent brakes on e bikes being a problem, most of them seem to be very anaemic compared to motor bikes.  some of the fast ones look to have very small wheels as well, they seem to be an accident waiting to happen.

if folk want to ride fast and smash themselves up just let them get on with it...freedom of choice..there is no need for regulations,number plates will never work because police havent got a chance of arresting them,its all been overblown due to this salford fake psyop

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  • 3 weeks later...

This was from earlier this year in Birmingham:

 

Bus passengers shouted 'stop' as boy, 12, knocked down and killed while riding e-scooter

Quote

A 12-year-old boy riding an e-scooter was killed accidentally after colliding with a pedestrian and falling into the path of an oncoming bus in Birmingham, an inquest was told. Mustafa Nadeem was the first tragic death in 100 million Voi operated rides across the globe.

from: https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/bus-passengers-shouted-stop-boy-27224275

 

"One in a million"

 

Anyway, it turns out this little angel wasn't as 'innocent' as his family made out.

 

Quote

The hearing was told that the Voi account used to unlock the e-scooter had initially belonged to a man over the age of 18. Mustafa’s friend used their dad’s Voi account and then transferred it onto their phone. They then used their under 16’s bank account to pay for rides. The hearing was told that Mustafa “persistently” asked his 14-year-old friend to unlock the e-scooter, which they eventually did.

 

Voi said there was no way to identify the user’s age from bank account used to hire the e-scooter. It said changes to accounts can now only be made three times in six-months and users can be blocked.

 

I suppose its some consolation that this kid was using his own bank account to pay for these rides, but then again where was he getting the money from? (These scooters aren't that cheap to hire and use)

 

 

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