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Its HERE: The Financial Crash Of A Generation Has Already Begun


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The financial crash that has been predicted for the last few years has arrived. And it's not hard to see that the writing is on the wall when it comes to how bad things may get with this economic collapse... or at least, a major recession. Over the last few weeks, US citizens have lost $9 trillion dollars in value from investments, pensions, and the like, due to the stock market absolutely tanking. In fact, it's been the single largest loss since the great recession caused by the 2008 housing collapse, and the second biggest loss since the Great Depression. There's a lot to be concerned about. However, there's also the potential to prepare yourself for what's coming. And even possibly, to make a ton of money from the market going down, as many others have throughout history. I'd love to hear your thoughts below.
0:00 - A crazy few weeks in finance 0:45 - The crash that's happening now 3:12 - The second part of the drama: real estate 5:15 - The first lesson: who to trust 6:44 - Keeping crashes in perspective 7:35 - Some final thoughts ► IMPORTANT LINKS: Enter your email via the link below for free weekly lessons and insights into becoming financially free, investing, global tax and corporate structures, passports, residencies, and more. JOIN: https://www.abundantia.co/ ► SOCIAL MEDIA: • Abundantia Instagram: @abundantia.co https://www.instagram.com/abundantia.co/ • Sorelle's Instagram: @sorelleamore https://instagram.com/sorelleamore • Leon's Instagram: @leonhill https://instagram.com/leonhill • Abundantia Twitter: https://twitter.com/abundantiaco • Abundantia Facebook: http://facebook.com/abundantiafinance Sorelle and Leon. Founders, Abundantia Liability Disclaimer: https://www.abundantia.co/disclaimer *We may earn a commission if you buy any products or services via the links in this video's description. This video is not investment, financial, or legal advice. It may be incorrect, outdated, inaccurate, or reflect personal opinions. This video is for entertainment purposes only. Presented by Sorelle Amore. Written by Leon Hill.

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6 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

Screenshot_20221006-173157_DuckDuckGo.jpg

 

How does one visualise what a quadrillion is, has Pi been worked out to a quadrillion digits yet, personally i think they make these words up, the truth is more like trading places where they fuk up everyone's lives for one dollar, they use these words to make feel like you were worth something, feel sorry for the poor bastard that has to account for every penny with an abacus as all the computers had a melt down like the matrix system fail when pacman finally got laid to rest, ewwww wa wa.

 

source-379897666.gif.582c156abdd311bd0b15c63c4a56cd78.gif

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I know it's all deliberate, but if there's any justice at all, the very financial experts and governments who've orchestrated all this should at the very least be made to spend the rest of their carreers stacking shelves in Aldi. They can't possibly be given a chance to advise on or mismanage anybody's assets ever again. (Mind, they're probably rich enough to never have to lift a finger again 🙁).

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7 minutes ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

I know it's all deliberate, but if there's any justice at all, the very financial experts and governments who've orchestrated all this should at the very least be made to spend the rest of their carreers stacking shelves in Aldi. They can't possibly be given a chance to advise on or mismanage anybody's assets ever again. (Mind, they're probably rich enough to never have to lift a finger again 🙁).

Work in Aldi? Sod that, they can do community service until the day they die. 

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Just now, Macnamara said:

 

elon musks robots will be doing that

 

Bugger Elon Musk though! With a bit of luck, his robots will rebel and dismantle him. 

 

And by the way, I'm more convinced Biden's one of his creations after seeing this clip from a few months ago...

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

I know it's all deliberate, but if there's any justice at all, the very financial experts and governments who've orchestrated all this should at the very least be made to spend the rest of their carreers stacking shelves in Aldi. They can't possibly be given a chance to advise on or mismanage anybody's assets ever again. (Mind, they're probably rich enough to never have to lift a finger again 🙁).

 

You're a bit more upmarket than me at your local Aldi, shelves? mine just dumps it on the floor 🤣

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3 minutes ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

$2 quadrillion. Remember that when you're coppering up for a tin of baked beans.

Bailed out by yours truly, the general public. Outrageous that is in my opinion. However, this is planned, whole system crash then introduce CBDC'S. That's the next phase, with a full on digital containing everything. After that, smart city gulags.

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2 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

Bailed out by yours truly, the general public. Outrageous that is in my opinion. However, this is planned, whole system crash then introduce CBDC'S. That's the next phase, with a full on digital containing everything. After that, smart city gulags.

 

And following on from smart city gulags the 'ALL NEW SHINY SMART CITY GULAG DERIVATIVES', but hurry time limited offer, expires when the system implodes again, but quicker.

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4 minutes ago, sock muppet said:

 

And following on from smart city gulags the 'ALL NEW SHINY SMART CITY GULAG DERIVATIVES', but hurry time limited offer, expires when the system implodes again, but quicker.

Well that point you'll be using imperial credits via your payment implant/tattoo or some retina shit, who knows. There'll be no need to crash any markets because it will be the new world order market. It'll just be the hunger games. 

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Shouldn't it be obvious by now that money is a trap and no more than a control tool for TPTB? They control everything about it including inflation, deflation, the supply chain, the value of currency, interest rates, how much is in circulation, etc. Money makes you a slave and only creates inequality. They will soon be taking it to the next level when they introduce a UBI and their social credit system. Money IS the root of all evil, but there are other alternatives to distribute goods and services. This looming depression could also be seen as an opportunity to relieve us from our bondage by creating a moneyless world. We know what their plan is ............... they've already told us, so the ball is now in our court. In the end the decision is ours. Don't feed the beast by complying. Reject their system and let's create our own. 

 

https://freeworldcharter.org/en/more

https://freeworldcharter.org/en/faqs

 

 

 “The issue today is the same as it has been throughout all history - whether man shall be allowed to govern himself or be ruled by the small elite." ~ TJ
                     

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1 hour ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

I know it's all deliberate, but if there's any justice at all, the very financial experts and governments who've orchestrated all this should at the very least be made to spend the rest of their carreers stacking shelves in Aldi. They can't possibly be given a chance to advise on or mismanage anybody's assets ever again. (Mind, they're probably rich enough to never have to lift a finger again 🙁).

I was thinking about hanging but maybe it's because I'm from Eastern Europe 🤣 It comes to my mind when in Poland most of the managers were recruited from bankrupted companies... What did they write in their CVs and what were their references? What to expect from such guy? 😔 

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26 minutes ago, JCP said:

Shouldn't it be obvious by now that money is a trap and no more than a control tool for TPTB? They control everything about it including inflation, deflation, the supply chain, the value of currency, interest rates, how much is in circulation, etc. Money makes you a slave and only creates inequality. They will soon be taking it to the next level when they introduce a UBI and their social credit system. Money IS the root of all evil, but there are other alternatives to distribute goods and services. This looming depression could also be seen as an opportunity to relieve us from our bondage by creating a moneyless world. We know what their plan is ............... they've already told us, so the ball is now in our court. In the end the decision is ours. Don't feed the beast by complying. Reject their system and let's create our own. 

 

https://freeworldcharter.org/en/more

https://freeworldcharter.org/en/faqs

 

 

 “The issue today is the same as it has been throughout all history - whether man shall be allowed to govern himself or be ruled by the small elite." ~ TJ
                     

 

But how will I pay for Netflix? 🤣

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22 hours ago, sock muppet said:

Would that be the new mkii coal powered versions.

 

April 2, 202210:45 PM GMT+1Last Updated 6 months ago

Britain could build seven nuclear power stations, minister says

LONDON, April 2 (Reuters) - Britain could build up to seven new nuclear power stations as part of a radical expansion of homegrown energy following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng told The Sunday Telegraph.

“There is a world where we have six or seven sites in the UK” by 2050, Kwarteng told the newspaper.

The Sunday Telegraph said ministers have agreed to set up a new development vehicle, called Great British Nuclear, to identify sites, cut through red tape to speed up the planning process, and bring together private firms to run each site.

https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/britain-could-build-seven-nuclear-power-stations-minister-2022-04-02/

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3 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

April 2, 202210:45 PM GMT+1Last Updated 6 months ago

Britain could build seven nuclear power stations, minister says

LONDON, April 2 (Reuters) - Britain could build up to seven new nuclear power stations as part of a radical expansion of homegrown energy following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng told The Sunday Telegraph.

“There is a world where we have six or seven sites in the UK” by 2050, Kwarteng told the newspaper.

The Sunday Telegraph said ministers have agreed to set up a new development vehicle, called Great British Nuclear, to identify sites, cut through red tape to speed up the planning process, and bring together private firms to run each site.

https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/britain-could-build-seven-nuclear-power-stations-minister-2022-04-02/

 

This is interesting as further into the article it says quote: 'two new large-scale nuclear plants by 2030 in addition to small modular reactors'.

Modular reactors, do you think possibly these might be LFTR's and for once a good idea has emerged from the space between their britney spears or am i being a pollyanna, sigh.

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2 minutes ago, sock muppet said:

This is interesting as further into the article it says quote: 'two new large-scale nuclear plants by 2030 in addition to small modular reactors'.

Modular reactors, do you think possibly these might be LFTR's and for once a good idea has emerged from the space between their britney spears or am i being a pollyanna, sigh.

 

i dunno but the perspective of the super rich cabal who run this world and who coordinate control of the worlds assets through forums like the WEF is not geared towards what is best for the planet or what is best for wider humanity

 

What they are laser focussed on is how do they maintain total control? By getting rid of fossil fuels and making everything electric, regardless of how that electricity is produced, they are then able to institute their technocracy (a society where peoples energy useage is monitored and micro-managed) because electricity can be measured, monitored and controlled and as they will control the spigot they will wield total control over the peasant class of their neo-fuedal system

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6 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

i dunno but the perspective of the super rich cabal who run this world and who coordinate control of the worlds assets through forums like the WEF is not geared towards what is best for the planet or what is best for wider humanity

 

What they are laser focussed on is how do they maintain total control? By getting rid of fossil fuels and making everything electric, regardless of how that electricity is produced, they are then able to institute their technocracy (a society where peoples energy useage is monitored and micro-managed) because electricity can be measured, monitored and controlled and as they will control the spigot they will wield total control over the peasant class of their neo-fuedal system

 

That's a NWO view point, what if the NWO is about to be taken down and the Dark Side actors had to emerge to show the intent and be identified, something to hope for at least, besides your not accounting for the DIY way of taking care of business👍

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36 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

a radical expansion of homegrown energy

 

But we don't have our own uranium mines in the UK so how is this any more homegrown than importing fossil fuels?  Also the way which British govts welcome foreign investors and companies to operate our energy infrastructure doesn't fill me with confidence. Although more diversification of power generation isn't a bad thing. 

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8 minutes ago, Campion said:

 

But we don't have our own uranium mines in the UK so how is this any more homegrown than importing fossil fuels?  Also the way which British govts welcome foreign investors and companies to operate our energy infrastructure doesn't fill me with confidence. Although more diversification of power generation isn't a bad thing. 

 

Rothschild plans for private nuclear power

NM ROTHSCHILD, the merchant bank, is in talks with the UK's leading power utilities on a proposed jointly owned nuclear power company, dubbed 'New Nuclear plc', which could raise funds and manage a new generation of UK nuclear power stations.

By The Newsroom
Sunday, 26th June 2005, 1:00 am
 

New nuclear needs positive taxonomies, says Rothschild & Co executive

19 March 2021

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Private investors need to see clear and consistent political support for nuclear energy as a way to tackle climate change if they are to play a role in raising the large amount of capital required for new-build projects, Stephen Vaughan, vice chair of Energy & Power at Rothschild & Co, said yesterday during World Nuclear Association's Strategic eForum on Sustainable Finance. Specifically, taxonomies must back investment in nuclear power, he said.

SV.jpg?ext=.jpgStephen Vaughan, vice chair of Energy & Power at Rothschild & Co

On the role of government in nuclear new build, Vaughan described EDF's Sizewell C project in Suffolk, England. The proposed twin EPR development will be a replica of the French company's Hinkley Point C, under construction in Somerset. This is primarily financed by EDF on its own balance sheet, but for Sizewell C the expectation is that EDF will not play a major role on the financing side. Instead the company will take a small minority stake.

"The ambition for Sizewell C is to raise private financing and that means a big quantum of capital, in excess of GBP20 billon (USD28 billion). And of course that capital needs to be raised at low cost. We need the power output from Sizewell C to be competitive and we're targeting a power price of GBP40-60/MWh," Vaughan said, adding this requires "the deepest pools of capital to be available".

Such a project cannot afford to face any impediments, which means the taxonomy and the environmental, social and corporate (ESG) reference points need to be positive.

"We want the biggest institutions to come and play and commit, and the formal requirements need to be fulfilled. But there is an additional, more subtle, requirement that is not just about taxonomy. There needs to be a broader context of political support that investors are going to believe is durable. There needs to be a clear declaration, and made with political consensus, that nuclear is essential to the country's net-zero goal and climate ambition. And that really cannot be equivocal. So it's about ESG classification, but it's also about the reputational issues that the investors will consider," Vaughan said.

Reputational risk


Investors look at a project, not only in terms of meeting regulatory requirements, but from a much broader set of stakeholder perspectives.

"They are worried about what their ultimate investors think, what their pensioners think (if it's a pension fund) or their savers. They're worried about what their employees and their customers think. It's against that backdrop that they need to see a clear consensus. These are going to be big, high-profile investments that investors do not want to be controversial.

"Those investments will in some cases be deployed for decades, sometimes in quite illiquid conditions, and so investors will extrapolate and ask themselves, 'Well, is this going be something I'm having to defend and to justify?' It must meet the relevant commercial criteria, but they need to know that it's going to be reputationally supportive. And that clearly requires the taxonomy to be in place and to be supportive, but it also needs a wider consensus, and a wider political declaration, that the nuclear project is a fundamental part of society's objectives to hit the climate targets."

This is already becoming evident in engagement with investors for Sizewell C, he said, adding, "We need all channels to be on for this sort of investment to be capable of being raised."

RAB model


The conference was moderated by Sama Bilbao y Léon, director general of World Nuclear Association, who asked whether the regulated asset based (RAB) model, which is being considered for the Sizewell C project, could also be used in developing countries. If not, then what are the alternatives, she asked.

"The issue around attracting capital is to create the right structure that presents for private investors a proposition which doesn’t impose too much risk," Vaughan said.

"At Sizewell C, the key issue has been sharing the risk appropriately between consumers and investors. That's the essence of the RAB model, but it's made slightly easier in the UK because Sizewell C will be a replica of HPC and so the design is going to be substantially proven as we go from Hinkley to Sizewell, and the same teams that build Hinkley will be building Sizewell."

The key starting point, he said, is there is "a perception and logic" that first-of-a-kind projects have created "a difficult backdrop" for new nuclear programmes. "We need to create an interesting investor profile if we're going to get the big quantum money and at the right cost of capital, so it's really important to present a really clean proposition to investors."

In developing markets, the key issue is the credit rating, he said.

"If you want to raise the Sizewell quanta of capital that are needed for a nuclear project, and you're going to attract at a cost of a competitive electricity price, then you're going to need a strong investment grade credit rating. The essence of the RAB model is that the platform for the credit rating is the consumer covenant - Is the power tariff of sufficient credit quality to support the borrowing of the project at an attractive strong investment grade credit rating? That would be the key question." He added: "Politically, it's important that there is a perception that you are posing to customers an acceptable level of risk and are not just dumping on customers every risk."

Need for momentum


On the outlook for the development of nuclear, Vaughan asked, "Are we going to be stumbling along, building first-of-a-kind in new jurisdictions? Are we going to have a very limited build-back programme or are we going to repeat the experiences of the 1970s and 1980s, when there was a rollout of new nuclear that was sufficiently frequent, and the momentum was sufficiently large, for the constructors to be able to get on top of the construction issues, and nuclear was capable of being delivered with relatively low risk and at a good cost.

"And we're really only at the beginning of that process with the resurgence of nuclear at the moment. Let's face it, if you're going to deploy nuclear in a way that meaningfully contributes to climate change goals, it means those assets have got to be functioning by the 2040s and 2050s. A project like Sizewell has a 10-year gestation. It's going to only be producing in the early 2030s, so there's a big question mark out there: Is nuclear going to go through a big acceleration, where it's going to be really meaningfully deployed during the late 2030s and early 2040s? If it is, then the risk perception changes, and then you can be much more imaginative about financing models."

Government funding


Until there is such a momentum in support for new nuclear build, Vaughan said the 'alternatives' to the RAB model are going to be much more focused on direct government funding, or government sponsored funding, perhaps through state controlled and state-owned facilities.

"The models that we have seen have very much centred on vendor supported models. EDF is building Hinkley Point C on its balance sheet, and we've seen others, such as Kepco, offering to put significant amounts of capital into projects," he said.

"But more evidently, the non-OECD actors - namely, China and Russia - have well-developed programmes with momentum, and they are able, probably, to assess the deployment risks of new nuclear construction more readily," he added. Russia's Rosatom has been able to offer "much more interesting financing packages and more risk-bearing construction projects", he said, "and I think things are going to have to change if we're going to have OECD models to match that."

RAB is "an interesting step" that can work in other jurisdictions, but "a fair wind" behind a widespread deployment of new reactor units is needed to reduce construction cost through practice.

It is really important, he said, that taxonomies have a common supportive stance.

"Sizewell C is only one project, but we're going to be tapping UK, European and US investors and, one way or another, they're going to get judged by their own taxonomies. If nuclear has a red light or an amber light in any of these jurisdictions, then that is going to have an adverse impact."

Reputational risk is a major concern to private investors, and so a taxonomy is "by no means nominal", he said. "It's really important".

A supportive taxonomy will support public declarations of pathways that corporate entities must follow, he said. These will set "examples, standards and benchmarks", with those who fail to follow them being "called out".

"This momentum of financial and strategic declarations by corporates is far more powerful than we sometimes realise," he said. "And they draw attention to the corporates who lag behind."

Researched and written by World Nuclear News

https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/New-nuclear-needs-positive-taxonomies-says-Rothsch

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5 minutes ago, Campion said:

 

But we don't have our own uranium mines in the UK so how is this any more homegrown than importing fossil fuels?  Also the way which British govts welcome foreign investors and companies to operate our energy infrastructure doesn't fill me with confidence. Although more diversification of power generation isn't a bad thing. 

 

But we do have about 300 to 600 years supply of coal approx, but don't quote me on that there's a rather large margin of error in there but i'm confident the true answer lies between, which is plenty of time to go and rape Antarctica and demolish a pristine environment which will keep the evil shitheads happy.

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3 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

Rothschild plans for private nuclear power

NM ROTHSCHILD, the merchant bank, is in talks with the UK's leading power utilities on a proposed jointly owned nuclear power company, dubbed 'New Nuclear plc', which could raise funds and manage a new generation of UK nuclear power stations.

By The Newsroom
Sunday, 26th June 2005, 1:00 am
 

New nuclear needs positive taxonomies, says Rothschild & Co executive

19 March 2021

Share

Private investors need to see clear and consistent political support for nuclear energy as a way to tackle climate change if they are to play a role in raising the large amount of capital required for new-build projects, Stephen Vaughan, vice chair of Energy & Power at Rothschild & Co, said yesterday during World Nuclear Association's Strategic eForum on Sustainable Finance. Specifically, taxonomies must back investment in nuclear power, he said.

SV.jpg?ext=.jpgStephen Vaughan, vice chair of Energy & Power at Rothschild & Co

On the role of government in nuclear new build, Vaughan described EDF's Sizewell C project in Suffolk, England. The proposed twin EPR development will be a replica of the French company's Hinkley Point C, under construction in Somerset. This is primarily financed by EDF on its own balance sheet, but for Sizewell C the expectation is that EDF will not play a major role on the financing side. Instead the company will take a small minority stake.

"The ambition for Sizewell C is to raise private financing and that means a big quantum of capital, in excess of GBP20 billon (USD28 billion). And of course that capital needs to be raised at low cost. We need the power output from Sizewell C to be competitive and we're targeting a power price of GBP40-60/MWh," Vaughan said, adding this requires "the deepest pools of capital to be available".

Such a project cannot afford to face any impediments, which means the taxonomy and the environmental, social and corporate (ESG) reference points need to be positive.

"We want the biggest institutions to come and play and commit, and the formal requirements need to be fulfilled. But there is an additional, more subtle, requirement that is not just about taxonomy. There needs to be a broader context of political support that investors are going to believe is durable. There needs to be a clear declaration, and made with political consensus, that nuclear is essential to the country's net-zero goal and climate ambition. And that really cannot be equivocal. So it's about ESG classification, but it's also about the reputational issues that the investors will consider," Vaughan said.

Reputational risk


Investors look at a project, not only in terms of meeting regulatory requirements, but from a much broader set of stakeholder perspectives.

"They are worried about what their ultimate investors think, what their pensioners think (if it's a pension fund) or their savers. They're worried about what their employees and their customers think. It's against that backdrop that they need to see a clear consensus. These are going to be big, high-profile investments that investors do not want to be controversial.

"Those investments will in some cases be deployed for decades, sometimes in quite illiquid conditions, and so investors will extrapolate and ask themselves, 'Well, is this going be something I'm having to defend and to justify?' It must meet the relevant commercial criteria, but they need to know that it's going to be reputationally supportive. And that clearly requires the taxonomy to be in place and to be supportive, but it also needs a wider consensus, and a wider political declaration, that the nuclear project is a fundamental part of society's objectives to hit the climate targets."

This is already becoming evident in engagement with investors for Sizewell C, he said, adding, "We need all channels to be on for this sort of investment to be capable of being raised."

RAB model


The conference was moderated by Sama Bilbao y Léon, director general of World Nuclear Association, who asked whether the regulated asset based (RAB) model, which is being considered for the Sizewell C project, could also be used in developing countries. If not, then what are the alternatives, she asked.

"The issue around attracting capital is to create the right structure that presents for private investors a proposition which doesn’t impose too much risk," Vaughan said.

"At Sizewell C, the key issue has been sharing the risk appropriately between consumers and investors. That's the essence of the RAB model, but it's made slightly easier in the UK because Sizewell C will be a replica of HPC and so the design is going to be substantially proven as we go from Hinkley to Sizewell, and the same teams that build Hinkley will be building Sizewell."

The key starting point, he said, is there is "a perception and logic" that first-of-a-kind projects have created "a difficult backdrop" for new nuclear programmes. "We need to create an interesting investor profile if we're going to get the big quantum money and at the right cost of capital, so it's really important to present a really clean proposition to investors."

In developing markets, the key issue is the credit rating, he said.

"If you want to raise the Sizewell quanta of capital that are needed for a nuclear project, and you're going to attract at a cost of a competitive electricity price, then you're going to need a strong investment grade credit rating. The essence of the RAB model is that the platform for the credit rating is the consumer covenant - Is the power tariff of sufficient credit quality to support the borrowing of the project at an attractive strong investment grade credit rating? That would be the key question." He added: "Politically, it's important that there is a perception that you are posing to customers an acceptable level of risk and are not just dumping on customers every risk."

Need for momentum


On the outlook for the development of nuclear, Vaughan asked, "Are we going to be stumbling along, building first-of-a-kind in new jurisdictions? Are we going to have a very limited build-back programme or are we going to repeat the experiences of the 1970s and 1980s, when there was a rollout of new nuclear that was sufficiently frequent, and the momentum was sufficiently large, for the constructors to be able to get on top of the construction issues, and nuclear was capable of being delivered with relatively low risk and at a good cost.

"And we're really only at the beginning of that process with the resurgence of nuclear at the moment. Let's face it, if you're going to deploy nuclear in a way that meaningfully contributes to climate change goals, it means those assets have got to be functioning by the 2040s and 2050s. A project like Sizewell has a 10-year gestation. It's going to only be producing in the early 2030s, so there's a big question mark out there: Is nuclear going to go through a big acceleration, where it's going to be really meaningfully deployed during the late 2030s and early 2040s? If it is, then the risk perception changes, and then you can be much more imaginative about financing models."

Government funding


Until there is such a momentum in support for new nuclear build, Vaughan said the 'alternatives' to the RAB model are going to be much more focused on direct government funding, or government sponsored funding, perhaps through state controlled and state-owned facilities.

"The models that we have seen have very much centred on vendor supported models. EDF is building Hinkley Point C on its balance sheet, and we've seen others, such as Kepco, offering to put significant amounts of capital into projects," he said.

"But more evidently, the non-OECD actors - namely, China and Russia - have well-developed programmes with momentum, and they are able, probably, to assess the deployment risks of new nuclear construction more readily," he added. Russia's Rosatom has been able to offer "much more interesting financing packages and more risk-bearing construction projects", he said, "and I think things are going to have to change if we're going to have OECD models to match that."

RAB is "an interesting step" that can work in other jurisdictions, but "a fair wind" behind a widespread deployment of new reactor units is needed to reduce construction cost through practice.

It is really important, he said, that taxonomies have a common supportive stance.

"Sizewell C is only one project, but we're going to be tapping UK, European and US investors and, one way or another, they're going to get judged by their own taxonomies. If nuclear has a red light or an amber light in any of these jurisdictions, then that is going to have an adverse impact."

Reputational risk is a major concern to private investors, and so a taxonomy is "by no means nominal", he said. "It's really important".

A supportive taxonomy will support public declarations of pathways that corporate entities must follow, he said. These will set "examples, standards and benchmarks", with those who fail to follow them being "called out".

"This momentum of financial and strategic declarations by corporates is far more powerful than we sometimes realise," he said. "And they draw attention to the corporates who lag behind."

Researched and written by World Nuclear News

https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/New-nuclear-needs-positive-taxonomies-says-Rothsch

 

Hmmmmm, how does it go, "put me in charge of a nations money and i care not what laws ye make", and this will be turned into "give me nuclear power and all your nations are belonging to us", this will end badly, doesn't anyone watch the Simpsons anymore.:classic_blink:

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