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This energy crisis is going MSM, are they breaking ranks against the elite:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/01/catastrophic-energy-crisis-will-fuel-revolt-against-failed-elites/

 

A catastrophic energy crisis will fuel a revolt against our failed elites

Politicians cannot shirk responsibility now for the extreme hardship millions of people are about to face

This is the summer before the storm. Make no mistake, with energy prices set to rise to unprecedented highs, we are approaching one of the biggest geopolitical earthquake in decades. The ensuing convulsions are likely to be of a far greater order of magnitude than those that followed the 2008 financial crash, which sparked protests culminating in the Occupy Movement and the Arab Spring. 

The gathering crisis could prove even more catastrophic than the oil shock of the 1970s, which wrecked the administrations of three British prime ministers, presaged 40 years of American entanglement in the Middle East, and (due to the oil glut that followed) ultimately triggered the Soviet Union’s collapse.

Carnage has already arrived in the developing world, with power outages from Cuba to South Africa. Sri Lanka is just one of a cascade of low-income countries where leaders face being driven out of power in an ignominious blaze of petrol droughts and loan defaults.

But the West is not going to escape this Armageddon. In fact, in many ways, it looks set to be its epicentre – and Britain, its Ground Zero.

In Europe and America, a technocratic elite system built on mythology and complacency is crumbling. Its founding fable – which prophesied the nation states’ glorious enmeshment in world government and supply chains – has metastasised into a parable of the perils of globalisation.

For all the attempts to depict the Ukraine war as a black swan event, a spike in basic commodity prices in a volatile world was perfectly predictable. People are left wondering why their leaders failed to make contingency plans, given that they sit on vast untapped reserves of gas, oil and coal. The EU was supine in the face of Putin’s bid to keep the region’s market divided and dominate its more compromised powers.

Nor is there any explanation for this fiasco apart from decades of failed assumptions and policy missteps by our governing class. In the wake of the financial crash, the establishment just about managed to convince the public to submit to the purifying rigours of austerity, persuading voters that we all shared the blame for the crisis and must all play a role in atoning for the country's mistakes. This time, elites cannot shirk responsibility for the consequences of their fatal errors.

Put simply, the emperor has no clothes. The establishment simply has no message for voters in the face of hardship. The only vision for the future it can conjure up is net zero – a dystopian agenda that takes the sacrificial politics of austerity and financialisation of the world economy to new heights. Actively campaigning for boiler bans, 15mph speed limits, and speculative green bubbles may seem like madness. But it is a perfectly logical programme for an elite that has become unhinged from the real world.

There are several countries where we might see the first signs of a resulting populist revolt. The Germans must swallow national humiliation along with higher energy bills, as their political leaders are taunted on the world stage for their naive bid to prioritise economic harmony and trade links over security. According to some analysts, France, which is no stranger to protest, could be the first in Europe to experience blackouts despite its sizeable nuclear industry. But it is Britain where things could truly blow.

The UK may well be the tinderbox of Europe. With the ousting of Boris Johnson and his imminent replacement by a politician who will not have led his or her party into power via a general election, the political context is particularly febrile. Even more so given disillusionment at the waste of the past two years and the failure of the Government to capitalise on Brexit to renew the country.

Moreover, Britain’s consumers look set to be clobbered harder than most. We already have the highest inflation in the G7. But a succession of fatal policy mistakes – from the closure of gas storage facilities to the failure to exploit our domestic oil and gas reserves – mean that we will remain unnecessarily vulnerable to sky-high international energy prices for years to come, with all the pain that will bring consumers.

Despite this, Britons are set to receive less assistance from the Government than their counterparts in other Western countries. The 5p cut in fuel duty has been estimated as the second smallest in Europe. While our politicians pontificate about insulating more homes at some point in the distant future, Spain has made many train journeys free until the end of the year. France has vowed to fully nationalise the energy giant EDF, which it had already forced to cap consumer bills.

A civil disobedience movement, inspired by the poll tax revolt, has already been launched here in the UK. The Don’t Pay campaign, which is urging people to join a “mass non-payment strike” when the energy price cap is raised in October, has gained thousands of online supporters.

And if it does take off, what are the authorities going to be able to do about it? Such is the scale of the coming price rises that millions may simply be unable to pay their bills – including pensioners and families hitherto part of the middle classes. The risk is that, bogged down with leadership hustings, the Tories realise too late that they need to act. The predicament we face is likely game-changing. We have barely begun to grasp how unpredictable the next few years are likely to be – and how poorly prepared we are to face the consequences. 

If weaning ourselves off Russia – a comparatively small economy – is this painful, how are we to end our addiction to cheap goods from China? If we do manage to achieve a greater degree of energy self-reliance, how will we contend with the collapse of petrostates in the Middle East and the migration crisis that is likely to follow?

This may sound like a grim prognosis, but particularly in Britain it does feel as if we just may have entered the final act of an economic system that has patently failed. It is clearer than ever that the emperor has no clothes and has no more stories to distract us with. 

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I'm not so sure about breaking the ranks as trying to advance the elites plan. To build back better TPTB need to beak down what we have now. I'm of the opinion that civil disobediance and breakdown of current governments are part of the overall plan. IMHO they want/need disorder to move to the next stage.

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1 hour ago, Covidiot said:

I'm not so sure about breaking the ranks as trying to advance the elites plan. To build back better TPTB need to beak down what we have now. I'm of the opinion that civil disobediance and breakdown of current governments are part of the overall plan. IMHO they want/need disorder to move to the next stage.

 

I agree. The media will be reporting precisely what they've been instructed to by the so called elite. 

 

So if people do become fractious, en-mass, I hope they remember the role played by the media. 😉

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3 hours ago, Mikhail Liebestein said:

This energy crisis is going MSM, are they breaking ranks against the elite:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/01/catastrophic-energy-crisis-will-fuel-revolt-against-failed-elites/

 

A catastrophic energy crisis will fuel a revolt against our failed elites

Politicians cannot shirk responsibility now for the extreme hardship millions of people are about to face

This is the summer before the storm. Make no mistake, with energy prices set to rise to unprecedented highs, we are approaching one of the biggest geopolitical earthquake in decades. The ensuing convulsions are likely to be of a far greater order of magnitude than those that followed the 2008 financial crash, which sparked protests culminating in the Occupy Movement and the Arab Spring. 

The gathering crisis could prove even more catastrophic than the oil shock of the 1970s, which wrecked the administrations of three British prime ministers, presaged 40 years of American entanglement in the Middle East, and (due to the oil glut that followed) ultimately triggered the Soviet Union’s collapse.

Carnage has already arrived in the developing world, with power outages from Cuba to South Africa. Sri Lanka is just one of a cascade of low-income countries where leaders face being driven out of power in an ignominious blaze of petrol droughts and loan defaults.

But the West is not going to escape this Armageddon. In fact, in many ways, it looks set to be its epicentre – and Britain, its Ground Zero.

In Europe and America, a technocratic elite system built on mythology and complacency is crumbling. Its founding fable – which prophesied the nation states’ glorious enmeshment in world government and supply chains – has metastasised into a parable of the perils of globalisation.

For all the attempts to depict the Ukraine war as a black swan event, a spike in basic commodity prices in a volatile world was perfectly predictable. People are left wondering why their leaders failed to make contingency plans, given that they sit on vast untapped reserves of gas, oil and coal. The EU was supine in the face of Putin’s bid to keep the region’s market divided and dominate its more compromised powers.

Nor is there any explanation for this fiasco apart from decades of failed assumptions and policy missteps by our governing class. In the wake of the financial crash, the establishment just about managed to convince the public to submit to the purifying rigours of austerity, persuading voters that we all shared the blame for the crisis and must all play a role in atoning for the country's mistakes. This time, elites cannot shirk responsibility for the consequences of their fatal errors.

Put simply, the emperor has no clothes. The establishment simply has no message for voters in the face of hardship. The only vision for the future it can conjure up is net zero – a dystopian agenda that takes the sacrificial politics of austerity and financialisation of the world economy to new heights. Actively campaigning for boiler bans, 15mph speed limits, and speculative green bubbles may seem like madness. But it is a perfectly logical programme for an elite that has become unhinged from the real world.

There are several countries where we might see the first signs of a resulting populist revolt. The Germans must swallow national humiliation along with higher energy bills, as their political leaders are taunted on the world stage for their naive bid to prioritise economic harmony and trade links over security. According to some analysts, France, which is no stranger to protest, could be the first in Europe to experience blackouts despite its sizeable nuclear industry. But it is Britain where things could truly blow.

The UK may well be the tinderbox of Europe. With the ousting of Boris Johnson and his imminent replacement by a politician who will not have led his or her party into power via a general election, the political context is particularly febrile. Even more so given disillusionment at the waste of the past two years and the failure of the Government to capitalise on Brexit to renew the country.

Moreover, Britain’s consumers look set to be clobbered harder than most. We already have the highest inflation in the G7. But a succession of fatal policy mistakes – from the closure of gas storage facilities to the failure to exploit our domestic oil and gas reserves – mean that we will remain unnecessarily vulnerable to sky-high international energy prices for years to come, with all the pain that will bring consumers.

Despite this, Britons are set to receive less assistance from the Government than their counterparts in other Western countries. The 5p cut in fuel duty has been estimated as the second smallest in Europe. While our politicians pontificate about insulating more homes at some point in the distant future, Spain has made many train journeys free until the end of the year. France has vowed to fully nationalise the energy giant EDF, which it had already forced to cap consumer bills.

A civil disobedience movement, inspired by the poll tax revolt, has already been launched here in the UK. The Don’t Pay campaign, which is urging people to join a “mass non-payment strike” when the energy price cap is raised in October, has gained thousands of online supporters.

And if it does take off, what are the authorities going to be able to do about it? Such is the scale of the coming price rises that millions may simply be unable to pay their bills – including pensioners and families hitherto part of the middle classes. The risk is that, bogged down with leadership hustings, the Tories realise too late that they need to act. The predicament we face is likely game-changing. We have barely begun to grasp how unpredictable the next few years are likely to be – and how poorly prepared we are to face the consequences. 

If weaning ourselves off Russia – a comparatively small economy – is this painful, how are we to end our addiction to cheap goods from China? If we do manage to achieve a greater degree of energy self-reliance, how will we contend with the collapse of petrostates in the Middle East and the migration crisis that is likely to follow?

This may sound like a grim prognosis, but particularly in Britain it does feel as if we just may have entered the final act of an economic system that has patently failed. It is clearer than ever that the emperor has no clothes and has no more stories to distract us with. 

Trust the telegraph (the MSM) to divert attention to the government and its many failures. (big fucking yawn)
As we know.  All planned.  Everything - all planned.

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Why is this?

An email I just got.

National Grid - a new name for Western Power Distribution

 

As a Customer, we wanted to let you know that our name is changing. From September Western Power Distribution (WPD) will be known as National Grid.

 

Why National Grid?

We'll still be dedicated to keeping the lights on in your local area. But, with National Grid, we’ll be part of the largest electricity transmission and distribution business in the UK. This means we’ll be able to work together to ensure everyone can have clean, affordable energy, well into the future. In fact, National Grid is already leading the change to carbon-free energy such as solar and wind power.

 

 

Are all companies being bought by the company called National Grid?

From Companies House

 

1261797455_2022-08-0217_34_27s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com650e0c93309d.jpg.ff38d4caa542e6c7ad3fee10e57b5163.jpg

 

From last accounts March 2022 found here

https://find-and-update.company-information.service.gov.uk/company/09223384/filing-history

 

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1 hour ago, WD40 said:

Are all companies being bought by the company called National Grid?

 

2117321131_2022-08-0218_32.34find-and-update.company-information.service_gov.uk35b79314d34f.jpg.1220aed49d2e3396bd6ad8a154633476.jpg

 

1480569359_2022-08-0218_32.56www.bloomberg.comd9ec9e670d2d.jpg.631dadbdbe80c504e57c567b950dbded.jpg

 

 

 

GSK plc, formerly GlaxoSmithKline plc, is a British multinational pharmaceutical and biotechnology company with global headquarters in London, England.[3][4] Established in 2000 by a merger of Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham,[n 1] GSK was the world's sixth largest pharmaceutical company

In 2012, under prosecution by the United States Department of Justice (DoJ) based on combined investigations of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS-OIG), FDA and FBI, primarily concerning sales and marketing of the drugs Avandia, Paxil, and Wellbutrin, GSK pleaded guilty to promotion of drugs for unapproved uses, failure to report safety data, and kickbacks to physicians in the United States and agreed to pay a US$3 billion (£1.9bn) settlement. It was the largest health-care fraud case to date in the US and the largest settlement by a drug company.[10]

 

 

 

Energy companies being bought up and controlled by pharma companies!

Edited by WD40
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1 hour ago, WD40 said:

Why is this?

An email I just got.

National Grid - a new name for Western Power Distribution

 

As a Customer, we wanted to let you know that our name is changing. From September Western Power Distribution (WPD) will be known as National Grid.

 

Why National Grid?

We'll still be dedicated to keeping the lights on in your local area. But, with National Grid, we’ll be part of the largest electricity transmission and distribution business in the UK. This means we’ll be able to work together to ensure everyone can have clean, affordable energy, well into the future. In fact, National Grid is already leading the change to carbon-free energy such as solar and wind power.

 

 

Are all companies being bought by the company called National Grid?

From Companies House

 

1261797455_2022-08-0217_34_27s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com650e0c93309d.jpg.ff38d4caa542e6c7ad3fee10e57b5163.jpg

 

From last accounts March 2022 found here

https://find-and-update.company-information.service.gov.uk/company/09223384/filing-history

 

It operates in the USA too. 

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16 hours ago, Mikhail Liebestein said:

The gathering crisis could prove even more catastrophic than the oil shock of the 1970s, which wrecked the administrations of three British prime ministers, presaged 40 years of American entanglement in the Middle East, and (due to the oil glut that followed) ultimately triggered the Soviet Union’s collapse.

 

Having lived through the 70s in my childhood, I'm a little more phlegmatic about the prospects of a revolt. There were shocks like petrol going up to 50p a gallon, sugar rationing, power cuts and uncollected rubbish due to strikes, but our stoicism and general resignation in the UK resulted in only a swing towards the Thatcherism and yuppyism of the 80s. Some revolt! I hope there isn't serious suffering, but I'm still seeing too much clinging to national and international leaders for solving our problems, rather than asking ourselves how we can deal with this in our local communities. 

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To sum up how dumb people are. The msm papers front pages all about obscene profits for energy companies. Forgetting completely that it was the government who agreed the price cap change. Not paying your energy bill in October will do bugger all. The energy firms will just get a bailout. Plus being colder and wetter the protest won’t last long apart from a diehard few who will be demonised for stopping everyone else doing stuff. Like always.

It needs a protest now outside every government office in the country. Peaceful but to the point. Disturbing no normal businesses.

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16 minutes ago, Bombadil said:

To sum up how dumb people are. The msm papers front pages all about obscene profits fo4 energy companies. Forgetting completely that it was the government who agreed the price cap change. Not paying your energy bill in October will do bugger all. The energy firms will just get a bailout. Plus being colder and wetter the protest won’t last long apart from a die hard few who will. E demonised for stop everyone else doing stuff. Like always.

It needs a protest now outside every government office un the country. Peaceful but to the point. Disturbing no normal businesses.

 

Agreed. Also let's go further and expose the whole idea of "energy companies" as the total phoney it is. It's exactly the same electricity, gas, cables, pipes, power stations, etc whichever "supplier" we use. All we're changing is the admin. 

 

At least the water companies are more open about being a monopoly, though lord knows why they need to be privatised anyway! 

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3 hours ago, oddsnsods said:

Everything Net Zero - Services, Products, Solutions, and Support for the public sector transition to Net Zero

 

 

They want humans to beNet Zero too, can't have us breathing in precious Oxygen and converting it to Carbon Dioxide.

 

A good cold winter with extortionately priced gas will soon fix a lot of that.

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11 minutes ago, Mikhail Liebestein said:

 

They want humans to beNet Zero too, can't have us breathing in precious Oxygen and converting it to Carbon Dioxide.

 

A good cold winter with extortionately priced gas will soon fix a lot of that.

Agreed. I have a feeling this winter is going to be harsh weather wise.

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3 hours ago, Bombadil said:

Agreed. I have a feeling this winter is going to be harsh weather wise.

 

In terms of preparation, I've already started cutting back on gas use in the house. Normally had the hot water on 3 hours a day, but I've halved that. Similar with electricity.

 

My account balance is moving into credit, so should have a decent buffer in place for the winter costs. That said, if they ration gas, I have got 4 big Calor cylinders and a log burner on standby.

 

Normally we only 3-4 weeks max of terrible sub zero, so really just need to ride that out.

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16 hours ago, WD40 said:

Why is this?

An email I just got.

National Grid - a new name for Western Power Distribution

 

As a Customer, we wanted to let you know that our name is changing. From September Western Power Distribution (WPD) will be known as National Grid.

 

Why National Grid?

We'll still be dedicated to keeping the lights on in your local area. But, with National Grid, we’ll be part of the largest electricity transmission and distribution business in the UK. This means we’ll be able to work together to ensure everyone can have clean, affordable energy, well into the future. In fact, National Grid is already leading the change to carbon-free energy such as solar and wind power.

 

 

Are all companies being bought by the company called National Grid?

From Companies House

 

1261797455_2022-08-0217_34_27s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com650e0c93309d.jpg.ff38d4caa542e6c7ad3fee10e57b5163.jpg

 

From last accounts March 2022 found here

https://find-and-update.company-information.service.gov.uk/company/09223384/filing-history

 

Basically, National Grid runs the electricity infrastructure for England and some of Wales. It's Scottish Power in Scotland (mostly). It's strange, as their safety rules and guidance are slightly different - like order of earthing things and so on. You'd think electricity would be the same anywhere. They are what's left of the old nationalised body whatever it was called - possibly CEGB - got split up into gas side and electricity side, plus National Powergrid, who fix more domestic stuff like meters. It's a lot less confusing for the engineers if the rules they are working under are the same. Don't think that there is anything weird there. Of course, it would be more logical just to re-nationalise the whole thing

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8 hours ago, Mikhail Liebestein said:

 

They want humans to beNet Zero too, can't have us breathing in precious Oxygen and converting it to Carbon Dioxide.

 

A good cold winter with extortionately priced gas will soon fix a lot of that.

 

... Which I'm sure will be arranged by the appropriate geo-eningineering methods... problem - reaction - solution.

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2 hours ago, HAARPING_On said:

... Which I'm sure will be arranged by the appropriate geo-eningineering methods... problem - reaction - solution.

 

👍🏻 and the "problems" are contrived constructs to create fear and a scarcity mindset. That leads to a self-fulfilling prophecy with rising prices, to which the elite are insulated. How many more times will our people fall for this trick before we realise we've been had for a long time. 

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23 hours ago, eddy64 said:

afaik they cant cut the gas off to domestic properties  randomly, its too much of a safety risk.  

 

You are correct. I had a gas outage in my area due to a faulty valve. They cut off the gas to half the town for the repair. It required sending an engineer to every property to isolate the gas supply and once the repair was complete an engineer visited every property to recomm the supply and make sure system was properly bled and all gas appliances working. Extremely manpower intensive. However thats not to say that they won't cut off everyones gas to save it for the power stations to keep the lights on! People will be told to layer up and get a hotplate to cook their food. The domestic gas supplies will IMHO be sacrificed to keep the power on.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Not really related to this thread but I'm just posting it as an example of the depths to which large companies will stoop to avoid losing money ...

J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder after 38,000 lawsuits

Extract -

In an effort to avoid the brunt of the lawsuits, J&J spun off subsidiary LTL Management last October, assigning its talc claims to the company.

J&J then placed LTL into bankruptcy, which stalled the pending lawsuits.

Those suing claim Johnson & Johnson ought to defend itself.

The ‘bankruptcy gimmick is as despicable as it is brazen’ and ‘an unconscionable abuse of the legal system,’ said Linda Lipsen, chief executive of the American Association for Justice, a trial lawyers’ group, in a statement.

But earlier this year, New Jersey judge Michael Kaplan ruled that bankruptcy proceedings will not allow Johnson & Johnson to avoid the class action suits.

 

Source: https://principia-scientific.com/jj-to-stop-selling-talc-based-baby-powder-after-38000-lawsuits/

 

 

 

Edited by webtrekker
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I heard om the radio today; energy company's will pay people to turn large appliances off ... for those people on smart meters. Smart meters are stoopid 🤪 I suppose that means pay in credits / points? Hmm, I just remembered Esso points. This lark all leads to the same destination as 'their simple plan' ... mwah ha ha ha. 😆 

 

Isn't it strange to see it playing out, and openly announced, one or three steps at a time. 

 

I'm not laughing really, just trying to stay as cheerful as possible. Shisters 😉 

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