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Ancient and medieval finds near me


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Ok I know it’s the BBC but interesting for a change.

This reservoir has a stream of it that runs through my property. Had a look and is quite cool.

I do wander why they haven’t mentioned this before though. Probably because dry weather hasn’t exposed anything. The reason it has been exposed is because the dam was opened to help feed 2 other reservoirs miles away. 
 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-62222719

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Another example of an ancient site in britain that has been sabotaged, in this case by flooding with water

 

A chapel to st catherine was flooded with a reservoir in the pentlands in scotland too

 

Your quoit in the post above has also been rebuilt several times. They (the freemasons) move and meddle with all ancient sites

 

When we consider that these sites were placed specifically on leylines to perform specific tasks it represents a complete sabotage of an entire technology of our ancestors

 

its all part of a full spectrum attack across all areas of life. David knows this. The sabotage of our ancient sites is another aspect of the same war of which fluoride in the drinking water, mRNA bioweapon jabs, smnart technology and orchestrated MASS immigration are all a part

 

Its all the same thing: a war being waged against us

Edited by Macnamara
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20 hours ago, Bombadil said:

This reservoir has a stream of it that runs through my property. Had a look and is quite cool.

 

If you see me in and around your place with a shovel i'm just doing general maintenance 😁

I went to a wedding at that quoit some years back, well the field adjacent to it. It must be available for hire or something.

Cool blog btw, here's another article abut the area being an 'axe factory' https://cornishbirdblog.com/neolithic-greenstone-axe-factory-polstrong-valley-camborne/.

I bet there's loads still to find under Carn Brea too.

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40 minutes ago, spideysensei said:

 

If you see me in and around your place with a shovel i'm just doing general maintenance 😁

I went to a wedding at that quoit some years back, well the field adjacent to it. It must be available for hire or something.

Cool blog btw, here's another article abut the area being an 'axe factory' https://cornishbirdblog.com/neolithic-greenstone-axe-factory-polstrong-valley-camborne/.

I bet there's loads still to find under Carn Brea too.

There is a scouts camp area nearby they hire out as well. I have seen events going on so your probably right about hiring etc.

Ive been to the polstrong valley a few times. It’s a beautiful place.

Cornwall has loads of great old sites to explore. I get to do two things I really enjoy, ancient history and immersing myself in nature!

 

Thanks for the link😀

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If you live in Cornwall or get a chance to visit, and you like history, this is a great book for finding out what’s where etc

 

I’ve got a lot of others which I will post later

 

44588893-C43F-4B5B-BBA9-ECEB63FBF88E.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Bombadil said:

If you live in Cornwall or get a chance to visit, and you like history, this is a great book for finding out what’s where etc

 

I’ve got a lot of others which I will post later

 

44588893-C43F-4B5B-BBA9-ECEB63FBF88E.jpeg

 

roche rock....i was in that chapel recently....cleared it of litter

 

If i was cornish my concern would be with the widening of the A30 and how easy they are making it for the rich urbanites from the big cities like london to go right down to any point in cornwall and buy up property with their ill gotten gains from the city of london or whatever corporate skullduggery they sold their soul for

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9 hours ago, Macnamara said:

When we consider that these sites were placed specifically on leylines to perform specific tasks it represents a complete sabotage of an entire technology of our ancestors

 

the most common method they use though is masts. All kinds of telecommunication masts. Another one that you'll find on leylines is airports. I guess airports contain a lot of technology that creates distortive electro-magnetic energy fields

 

I found a bit of flint on a beach in islands off cornwall that has signs of being knapped for tools in the neolithic era. Bits have been chapped off and there are little strike marks where they have struck. It looks like they knapped off a few sharp pieces and then tossed the stone. The islanders were horrified when the usual suspects came out and started turning over their burial chambers.

 

Sadly much of what we see when we visit today is the raked over shell of what once was.

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9 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

roche rock....i was in that chapel recently....cleared it of litter

 

If i was cornish my concern would be with the widening of the A30 and how easy they are making it for the rich urbanites from the big cities like london to go right down to any point in cornwall and buy up property with their ill gotten gains from the city of london or whatever corporate skullduggery they sold their soul for

They don’t need to widen the A30 for that mate. Landlords are chucking out tenants then doubling the rent. Recently a holiday let was rented for £75000 for a week. Seriously a week I shit you not.

The council estates here that look like The Gaza Strip have rents of £1200 a month. To live in a shit hole.

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Just now, Bombadil said:

They don’t need to widen the A30 for that mate. Landlords are chucking out tenants then doubling the rent. Recently a holiday let was rented for £75000 for a week. Seriously a week I shit you not.

The council estates here that look like The Gaza Strip have rents of £1200 a month. To live in a shit hole.

 

building the skye bridge made the isle of skye just another part of the mainland

 

now they are seriously talking about building a tunnel from harris that would link up with the mainland

 

they just can't leave anything alone

 

everything then starts to look the same: the same corporate chain stores, the same fashions, the same viewpoints, the same concerns

 

they HAVE to do it in order to build the technocracy. Everything and everyone has to be smart and interconnected and under the aegis of the artificial intelligence

 

I just wish there was some adult conversation about it in the mainstream. Instead it seems it falls to a handful of us outliers who are largely ignored. No one stops to consider the COST of any of this and i don't mean the monetary cost. I'm talking about things beyond money....things that are priceless

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15 hours ago, Macnamara said:

 

the most common method they use though is masts. All kinds of telecommunication masts. Another one that you'll find on leylines is airports. I guess airports contain a lot of technology that creates distortive electro-magnetic energy fields

 

I found a bit of flint on a beach in islands off cornwall that has signs of being knapped for tools in the neolithic era. Bits have been chapped off and there are little strike marks where they have struck. It looks like they knapped off a few sharp pieces and then tossed the stone. The islanders were horrified when the usual suspects came out and started turning over their burial chambers.

 

Sadly much of what we see when we visit today is the raked over shell of what once was.

Absolutely. I’ve found quite a few interesting pieces that date back at least 5000 years plus. I loaned  them to the Royal Cornwall Museum. Let everyone see their heritage etc. RCM going to close soon as Council funding is at an end.

As I said before I have loads of books about ancient sites in Cornwall I’ll hunt them out later.

 

Luckily I have over 30 acres of land. On it there are signs of ancient activity. I’m not an Archaeologist though so I  just dig real slow😁

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3 minutes ago, Bombadil said:

Absolutely. I’ve found quite a few interesting pieces that date back at least 5000 years plus. I loaned  them to the Riyal Cornwall Museum. Let everyone see their heritage etc. RCM going to close soon as Council funding is at an end.

As I said before I have loads of books about ancient sites in Cornwall I’ll hunt them out later.

 

Luckily I have over 30 acres of land. On it there are signs of ancient activity. I’m not an Archaeologist though so I  just dig real slow😁

 

nice!

 

I've found some things too but i'll keep those under my hat! I also know of sites not on maps but i won't be divulging those either

 

we need to be custodians and keep their claws off what's left

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2 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

nice!

 

I've found some things too but i'll keep those under my hat! I also know of sites not on maps but i won't be divulging those either

 

we need to be custodians and keep their claws off what's left

My lady’s uncle an alcove at the end of an old passage in his house in Italy. In it he displayed his collection of Italic, Etruscan and Roman finds. Was amazing

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Here’s another nice little book to use if your in Cornwall. One of the best ways to see a lot of incredible countryside. Plus keeps my Lady happy with here obsession with Early Grave stones and churches.

There’s loads of info about each subject plus a good map

 

61B9226D-2B34-4D06-AC4E-C7B67C595E02.jpeg

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12 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

I've found some things too but i'll keep those under my hat

I’m the same. Even when I take my dog for a walk I try not to take the same route. Same when we go out for the day. My lady is expert at driving up every random farm road and track. Completely intentional. This is where we’ve always found our best locations.

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25 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

If i was cornish my concern would be with the widening of the A30 and how easy they are making it for the rich urbanites from the big cities

 

It's a bit of a vicious circle. Increased population begets insufficient infrastructure, so you make that sufficient which leads the way for more development and population.

 

Cornwall has typically been underdeveloped compared to the rest of the UK - the EU tried to fill these gaps whilst heavily promoting our regional heritage and of course the EU. It always felt like they were buying us off. Give em a fireworks display every year, some new housing and we'll keep them on our side.

 

Helping to break down any sort of British allegiance was also part of it i think. Not that it was hard because people have a strong identity here, but let's get real, Cornwall was a dark age kingdom that had no chance once there was any kind of centralised control in Britain. That's just life. I absolutely respect the history but don't care for the nationalists. They'd just take us into the EU anyway.

 

 

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I read an interesting wee book recently called 'the smugglers banker: the story of zephaniah job'

 

He had shown aptitude as a lad so was cherry picked to be a pit captain. To do that job a person had to be proficient at writing and mathematics as well as geology and he was given a solid grounding in all of those but then something happened; perhaps he killed someone in an altercation and fled to the southern shore at polperro where he became the accountant of the smugglers.

 

The book details from his records, that weren't burned following his death, how the cornish smugglers would buy untaxed goods on credit from the families on jersey and would then ship the goods to the cornish coast to be sold on to inn keeps, land owning gentry, merchants and the likes.

 

The money was being channelled through financial houses in london and the book states that at the peak of the smuggling trade there wouldn't have been many people within financial circles in london who had not heard of that small fishing port so substantial were the sums of money involved!

 

It also says that many were driven to smuggling because staples like salt, which the fishermen needed to preserve their pilchards over the winter was being taxed to the point that the fishermen faced starvation in the colder months

 

Another thing the sailors in those parts did was turn privateer in times of war for example against france. You could apply for a licence to become a privateer and set up your own ship to go and raid french shipping. In our current times where you need a licence for firearms it seems remarkable that then you could get a crew together armed to the teeth with muskets and pistols and cutlasses and a ship with cannon and then go and commit legalised acts of violence against enemy shipping as a private venture.

 

Imagine that: getting a bunch of pals and investors together, arming yourself and your boat and then heading out to sea to capture enemy ships. The captured ships and their goods would then be sold off in official state run auctions whilst you'd receive a reward for each captured prisoner to ensure no foul play at sea (eg throwing people overboard or cutting throats).

 

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14 minutes ago, spideysensei said:

It's a bit of a vicious circle. Increased population begets insufficient infrastructure, so you make that sufficient which leads the way for more development and population.

 

Cornwall has typically been underdeveloped compared to the rest of the UK - the EU tried to fill these gaps whilst heavily promoting our regional heritage and of course the EU. It always felt like they were buying us off. Give em a fireworks display every year, some new housing and we'll keep them on our side.

 

Helping to break down any sort of British allegiance was also part of it i think. Not that it was hard because people have a strong identity here, but let's get real, Cornwall was a dark age kingdom that had no chance once there was any kind of centralised control in Britain. That's just life. I absolutely respect the history but don't care for the nationalists. They'd just take us into the EU anyway.

 

 

there are interesting little pockets in the world that have clannish identities for example the appalachians are one of the most under funded parts of the US and of course sabbatean hollywood loves to make insulting depictions of hillbillies as backward people when they live in such a heavily funded area

 

BUT funding and civilisation bring their own problems

 

I know places need to retain their young and people are concerned that the young might be drawn away by the bright lights of the cities but i think that is more a failing in what and who we are bringing up our young to value and admire. The scottish government is offering people £50,000 to relocate to the scottish isles but is that really to assist the populations or is it more about changing the existing demographics? I don't trust anything that comes out of the SNP government anymore

 

It really needs a shift in perception about what is 'cool'. Is the nightclubs and corporate chains of the cities 'cool' or is the folk music and traditions and deeper connection with the land of the isles 'cool'

 

Its a struggle over the soul of the young

 

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31 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

It really needs a shift in perception about what is 'cool'. Is the nightclubs and corporate chains of the cities 'cool' or is the folk music and traditions and deeper connection with the land of the isles 'cool'

 

Its a struggle over the soul of the young

 

👍  that sense of connection is important, belonging somewhere and having a pride in your traditions. I've moved round the country several times in my life, so it needn't take long if you're willing and familiar with the general culture. But the pop culture which saturates the western world has no interest in such things; too late do young people discover that the corporate 'coolness' is shallow and lacking in a meaning for their lives, and so we have increasing mental illness, drug taking and suicide. With all the immigration and Americanisation of our culture, it'll probably take several hundred years to rebuild. 

  

I was pleased to discover that one of the main roads in my local village* was a Roman road and possibly going further back. The only archaeological finds I've made are bits of clay pipes and pottery in the garden, but that still gives me pleasure at having that little connection with the previous residents here. 

 

* I say 'village' but it's been swallowed up into a 'neighbourhood' by the local town becoming a city.  It's kind of like globalisation at a micro level, but I still call us a village; it's one way of resisting the onslaught. 

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21 minutes ago, Campion said:

 

👍  that sense of connection is important, belonging somewhere and having a pride in your traditions. I've moved round the country several times in my life, so it needn't take long if you're willing and familiar with the general culture.

 

The land itself becomes like the canvas on which we etch our lives. When we see a familiar place we have memories in that place. Some of the memories are our personal memories, some are the memories of our families and some are historical memories that we have learned about.

 

The placenames too contain their own memory of that place. Britains place names are rich with meaning and history.

 

Our ancestors connected even further with the land by tying their myths to the landscape itself. Cornwall for example is deeply linked to king arthur and the lost lands of lyonesse. There is dozmary pool where he is said to have been given excalibur by the lady of the lake. But the myths obviously have to be internalised by the individual as they themself become the hero in their own journey through the landscape. The sites within the landscape then become aids within that process.

 

I don't see myself as separate from this land. I see myself as completely entwined with it

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On 7/21/2022 at 12:24 PM, spideysensei said:

 

If you see me in and around your place with a shovel i'm just doing general maintenance 😁

I went to a wedding at that quoit some years back, well the field adjacent to it. It must be available for hire or something.

Cool blog btw, here's another article abut the area being an 'axe factory' https://cornishbirdblog.com/neolithic-greenstone-axe-factory-polstrong-valley-camborne/.

I bet there's loads still to find under Carn Brea too.

Carn Brea is a mound with a buried giant according to local myths.

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5 minutes ago, Captainlove said:

Carn Brea is a mound with a buried giant according to local myths.

 

Never actually heard that one. It's got loads of cool rocks, thrown by giants in some stories. The castle is an awesome little structure. I would love to own it and man it with crossbowmen, doing the odd shift myself. I wonder now that their father is dead if the Sawalha sisters would be tempted to sell.

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1 hour ago, spideysensei said:

 

Never actually heard that one. It's got loads of cool rocks, thrown by giants in some stories. The castle is an awesome little structure. I would love to own it and man it with crossbowmen, doing the odd shift myself. I wonder now that their father is dead if the Sawalha sisters would be tempted to sell.

Its not a castle, Its a hunting lodge. It was for sale a long while ago for £250,000 i think if i remember.

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8 hours ago, Captainlove said:

Its not a castle, Its a hunting lodge. It was for sale a long while ago for £250,000 i think if i remember.

 

It's actually a restaurant. It's not vastly inconsistent with the definition and look of a castle, hence it is usually thought of as a castle. If we are naming based on current functionality, it is a restaurant. At some point it was possibly used as a hunting lodge, and before that maybe a chapel. I think the exact history is a little sketchy.

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