Jump to content

How Online Services Trap And Deceive Users With "Dark Patterns"


Truthblast

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Truthblast said:

Menus and UIs deliberately designed to trap internet users:

https://www.deceptive.design/

 

 

 

Thanks for sharing this. I have known about this phenomena for years and could not for the life of me remember what the name was. 

 

I noticed this deceitful practice years ago on Amazon when they have a particular interface when you're buying something which is designed to manipulate you into taking out an Amazon Prime subscription. Hence why I use various other online retailers if I can avoid using Amazon.

 

It's the kind of sly, devious manipulation you would expect from multi-billion dollar companies. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Ethel said:

 

Thanks for sharing this. I have known about this phenomena for years and could not for the life of me remember what the name was. 

 

I noticed this deceitful practice years ago on Amazon when they have a particular interface when you're buying something which is designed to manipulate you into taking out an Amazon Prime subscription. Hence why I use various other online retailers if I can avoid using Amazon.

 

It's the kind of sly, devious manipulation you would expect from multi-billion dollar companies. 

I had this experience with LinkedIn or lockedIn as I call it. Was a proper ball ache deleting that profile but I managed it in the end. I never knew this was it's name but funny how I've experienced this before. Interesting video.

Edited by Morpheus
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

50 minutes ago, Ethel said:

I noticed this deceitful practice years ago on Amazon when they have a particular interface when you're buying something which is designed to manipulate you into taking out an Amazon Prime subscription. Hence why I use various other online retailers if I can avoid using Amazon.

 

It's the kind of sly, devious manipulation you would expect from multi-billion dollar companies. 

 

A few years ago now, at work I attended some ecommerce event in London, and one of the talks given was about website design.

 

I did pick up some useful tips and tricks, but one thing that was highlighted was how 'easy' it was to buy something on Amazon.

 

So easy in fact, you'd be surprised how many order return requests we receive with the reason given being "accidental order" (yes, that is genuinely a return reason one can select!).

 

We've also been accused of sending products to customers that "didn't order them" - "I was only looking at this product, I didn't buy it, but it was delivered to me and you took my money!", sorry but it doesn't work like that!

 

Half the time the problem is that people aren't paying enough attention to what they are doing. But Amazon are indeed 'masters of deception', how else does anyone think they became the biggest online retailer?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...