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Did Theodor Adorno Write All The Songs & Music For The Beatles ?


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One of the finest conspiracy theories concerning popular culture is the claim that Theodor Adorno  secretly wrote all the Beatles songs.

 

Adorno was part of a secret society who recognized his amazing skills in teaching/understanding classical music and put them to good use. 

 

Before his death in August 1969 (the very reason the Beatles disbanded, as their master composer was gone) Adorno wrote hundreds of songs to be distributed later (1969 – 1975) to various groups, that is why the early 70s music sounded so much better than the late 70s music, and the very reason why Led Zeppelin were musically dead after the last of the Adorno songs.

 

The theory seems to have originated with The Committee of 300, a book by supposed ex-MI6 agent John Coleman. (Shorter writeup by Coleman.)

https://educate-yourself.org/cn/colemanbeatlesandAquarianConspiracy01mar07.shtml

The Beatles were called after the Egyptian's Scarab Beetle

 

Here is what he did with Martha, by von Flotow:

 

 

He reworked this forgotten classical tune into one of the very best melodies ever written: Martha My Dear.

 

And here He transformed this into one of the most haunting ballads ever written: Blackbird.

 

 

 


 

1.  Yellow Submarine

Actually the theme from Verdi's Aida combined the Toreador song from Carmen by Bizet.

2.  Got To Get You Into My Life
A modified Can't Buy Me Love (actually Aine Kleine Nacht Musik by Mozart).

3.  A tie: Penny Lane and Something

Penny Lane - Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21 (Elvira Madigan)
Something - Adagio from Spartacus, Khachaturian

4. Yesterday
A modified Neapolitan song, called "Piccere' Che Vene a Dicere"

5. Sgt. Pepper
Sgt. Pepper is clever combination of the Radetzky March and the Romanian rhapsody no 1 by Enescu

6.  Hey Jude

For Hey Jude, Adorno pulled out all stops, he grouped into one song, masterfully, the Ride of the Walkiries by Wagner, the theme from the Piano Concerto no. 1 by Tchaikovsky, and the theme from Symphony no 9 by Beethoven.

7.  A Hard Day's Night
The biggest monster hit of the entire rock-pop era, from the best Beatles LP by the same name.
A modified Rossini's William Tell overture.

 

https://rocknerd.co.uk/2016/10/13/theodor-adorno-of-the-frankfurt-school-wrote-all-the-beatles-songs-as-a-cultural-marxist-assault-on-america-possibly/

 

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I suspect that the Beatles (and many, most, or all other bands/artists) are a creation of Tavistock and continues today. Did Adorno write their music? -

My guess is yes.

The moneyed interests of the publishers are the ones that dictate our music. Money RULES - And that has to change.

I also think Lennon was murdered because he was about to expose the scam and that McCartney was replaced in 1966.

 

 

I see the likelihood of the former custodian of Paul McCartney's childhood house, as being the original Paul.

 

 

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9 hours ago, JCP said:

I also think Lennon was murdered because he was about to expose the scam and that McCartney was replaced in 1966.

 

Or the earth is flat 😜

 

 

"Don't you miss the big time boy, you're no longer on the ball?"
I'm just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round
 
303349511_awheelx.jpg.c308dcfea17bfc0b7a252617be562d00.jpg
 
Ezekiel's wheel
 
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all songs are derivatives of classical pieces and those will be derived from previous unrecorded/unwritten musical pieces 

 

heres some fun

 

 

Edited by zArk
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10 minutes ago, screamingeagle said:

especialy to the non trained,no skill ears!!

i needed herbal assistance due to mainly gluten induced brain fog deafness in my youth. 

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Here's a link to download The Committee of 300 as PDF.

https://ia803209.us.archive.org/15/items/committee300/committee300.pdf

 

The Adorno stuff is the usual twaddle.

And all songs are NOT derivatives of classical pieces.

Please tell me where any song on Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart is derived from any classical piece.

The band were familiar with artists such as Salvador Dali and composers such as John Cage and Harry Partch.

Add some primitive Blues and Free Jazz and off you go!

 

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4 hours ago, gregory-peccary said:

Here's a link to download The Committee of 300 as PDF.

https://ia803209.us.archive.org/15/items/committee300/committee300.pdf

 

The Adorno stuff is the usual twaddle.

And all songs are NOT derivatives of classical pieces.

Please tell me where any song on Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart is derived from any classical piece.

The band were familiar with artists such as Salvador Dali and composers such as John Cage and Harry Partch.

Add some primitive Blues and Free Jazz and off you go!

 

There's plenty of grass roots music not mentioned here, you've covered the biggest two in jazz and blues. We should also add things like disco, house, electronic music, hip hop and shot loads more. I agree there has been a manipulation in the music industry, but I don't believe it's the work of one man. 

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22 hours ago, alexa said:

The theory seems to have originated with The Committee of 300, a book by supposed ex-MI6 agent John Coleman. (Shorter writeup by Coleman.)

https://educate-yourself.org/cn/colemanbeatlesandAquarianConspiracy01mar07.shtml

 

after just living through a global mindcontrol program pretty sure all 'big blockbusters' , 'supergroups' etc are completely manufactured and control

 

The Matrix was a  rip off. Wachowskis were failed script writers handed a frankensteined matrix script and told to front it for £££££.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, zArk said:

after just living through a global mindcontrol program pretty sure all 'big blockbusters' , 'supergroups' etc are completely manufactured and control

 

Absolutely, I mean, who was the best musician ever known in heaven, until he got chucked out ? :classic_biggrin:

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  • 1 month later...

It is interesting to listen to  Joseph Atwill's analysis of

I am the walrus 

and it's  meaning and references  to Boar war etc depopulation agenda ( crying as walrus and carpenter *eaten all oysters )

Edited by Talorgan
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On 6/25/2022 at 9:36 AM, alexa said:

One of the finest conspiracy theories concerning popular culture is the claim that Theodor Adorno  secretly wrote all the Beatles songs.

 

Adorno was part of a secret society who recognized his amazing skills in teaching/understanding classical music and put them to good use. 

 

Before his death in August 1969 (the very reason the Beatles disbanded, as their master composer was gone) Adorno wrote hundreds of songs to be distributed later (1969 – 1975) to various groups, that is why the early 70s music sounded so much better than the late 70s music, and the very reason why Led Zeppelin were musically dead after the last of the Adorno songs.

 

The theory seems to have originated with The Committee of 300, a book by supposed ex-MI6 agent John Coleman. (Shorter writeup by Coleman.)

https://educate-yourself.org/cn/colemanbeatlesandAquarianConspiracy01mar07.shtml

The Beatles were called after the Egyptian's Scarab Beetle

 

Here is what he did with Martha, by von Flotow:

 

 

He reworked this forgotten classical tune into one of the very best melodies ever written: Martha My Dear.

 

And here He transformed this into one of the most haunting ballads ever written: Blackbird.

 

 

 


 

1.  Yellow Submarine

Actually the theme from Verdi's Aida combined the Toreador song from Carmen by Bizet.

2.  Got To Get You Into My Life
A modified Can't Buy Me Love (actually Aine Kleine Nacht Musik by Mozart).

3.  A tie: Penny Lane and Something

Penny Lane - Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21 (Elvira Madigan)
Something - Adagio from Spartacus, Khachaturian

4. Yesterday
A modified Neapolitan song, called "Piccere' Che Vene a Dicere"

5. Sgt. Pepper
Sgt. Pepper is clever combination of the Radetzky March and the Romanian rhapsody no 1 by Enescu

6.  Hey Jude

For Hey Jude, Adorno pulled out all stops, he grouped into one song, masterfully, the Ride of the Walkiries by Wagner, the theme from the Piano Concerto no. 1 by Tchaikovsky, and the theme from Symphony no 9 by Beethoven.

7.  A Hard Day's Night
The biggest monster hit of the entire rock-pop era, from the best Beatles LP by the same name.
A modified Rossini's William Tell overture.

 

https://rocknerd.co.uk/2016/10/13/theodor-adorno-of-the-frankfurt-school-wrote-all-the-beatles-songs-as-a-cultural-marxist-assault-on-america-possibly/

 

...in all seriousness...

 

With all due respect, this could be done with just about any popular song, for as long as there have been popular songs. There are only so many chords and so many ways of playing them together that "makes sense" to the ear. Music is universal, a language all unto it's self. I could be anywhere in the world and play some slide guitar Blues for what ever people were around and they would groove on it,even if it was not a music they were familiar with nor a part of their culture. So, even if one isn't a trained musician, most healthy, normal humans respond to musical notes that are played in a manner which is pleasing to our ears, which seems to be universal.

 

Anyways, back to what I was saying...

 

There are only so many chords, notes, scales, etc that one has an option of playing/using in order to create a series of songs played in consecutive order. As a result, you tend to get a lot of similarity between songs. Like it or not, you crazy punk rockers, there are certain rules to music...as a certain musician friend of mine would point out with his "Circle of Fifths" poster on the wall...

 

Like I said, there are all kinds of examples of this in popular music, always has been:

 

Alex Jones of INFOWARS fame singing, "O Sole Mio":

 

 

The King, Elvis Presley with, "It's Now or Never":

 

You hear that? Same damned song.

 

 

Here's George Gershwin with, "Fascinating Rhythm:

 

 

Then, we have Deep Purple with, "Burn":

 

Same riff, only as if Gershwin was a coke addict who played the electric guitar.

 

 

See. I know fancy schmanchy music, too!

 

 

And it just happens over and over again. Like this trio...

This music video is Jay Conrad Teletubbie, Jr. Certified

 

 

 

here's another fun one...

 

...jeepers! I could do this all night long...

 

 

Regarding Led Zeppelin...most of their greatest and biggest hits were based on old blues and rhythm & blues songs. You can give Willie Dixon credit for that one! But that's for another post. 

 

The Beatles songwriting and early musical styles are due much more by the influence of three men; Buddy Holly and the Everly Brothers.

 

Now this "interesting" claim : "Adorno wrote hundreds of songs to be distributed later (1969 – 1975) to various groups, that is why the early 70s music sounded so much better than the late 70s music, and the very reason why Led Zeppelin were musically dead after the last of the Adorno songs " - Again, The Mighty Zep was a blues band. The two things that "killed" Led Zeppelin was Bonzo's death, then it was the youth slowly turning away from blues based rock 'n roll. Late 70's/early 80's were rough on a lot of, what is now called, "Classic Rock" artist. It was a crazy time. Phil Collins became a pop star and he's a garden gnome, for cryin' out loud! Elton John and Bernie Taupin still wrote a great many incredible songs through the late 70's, by the way. Not to mention bands like The Talking Heads, The Ramones, Blondie, Elvis Costello, Nick Lowe...did I mention David Bowie, Prince...the list goes on. Lots of great music in that time period. So, I think that's a rather, dare I say, ignorant claim?

 

Music also sucks a lot more today because so few kids are learning how to play actual musical instruments and they have all but abandoned rock's blues base. Most vocal tracks have become so digitized that music, that thing that speaks to and feeds our very souls, is no longer as nourishing. It's stepping too far away from it's human element. I like playing my Les Pauls through a tube amp with nothing between the guitar and the amp. You just can't digitally fake nor recreate that sound and that feel. What popular band of today are doing that? Can you hear any vocalist sing clean and clear like Ella, without any studio wizardry? That's why a lot of popular music sucks, today. Not because some secret agent wrote every great song of the Twentieth century died and left us with nothing but Beyonce and Nickleback.

 

By the way, the Beatles derived their name from the previous mentioned musical genius, Buddy Holly who's band was called, "The Crickets". If you've seen the movie "The Buddy Holly Story", starring Gary Busey you know why Buddy called his group the Crickets. Though they fudged on a few small things in that movie, as they always do in Hollywoodland when it comes to bio flicks, they had that one correct. The lads in the Beatles, thinking themselves clever, changed the spelling to "beat" as a play on words. 

Edited by KingKitty
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5 hours ago, KingKitty said:

With all due respect, this could be done with just about any popular song, for as long as there have been popular songs.

 

Yes I agree with this concept but Adorno was part of a secret society who recognized his amazing skills in teaching/understanding classical music and put them to good use. Before his death in August 1969 (the very reason the Beatles disbanded, as their master composer was gone) Adorno wrote hundreds of songs to be distributed later (1969 – 1975) to various groups, that is why the early 70s music sounded so much better than the late 70s music, and the very reason why Led Zeppelin were musically dead after the last of the Adorno songs, KASHMIR, was included on Physical Graffiti.

 

 Theodor Adorno, a main figure in what became known as the Frankfurt School — proponents of an obscure academic approach to cultural criticism later branded “cultural Marxism” by communists annoyed they were too arty and not sufficiently doctrinaire — secretly wrote all the Beatles’ songs.

 

Controlled-

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6 hours ago, KingKitty said:

Lots of great music in that time period. So, I think that's a rather, dare I say, ignorant claim?

Agreed and we've not even covered the likes of soul, funk and disco which was also a huge part of the 70's. Were all those tunes written by Adorno? 

 

Hell no, I know Rick James didn't have no Adorno write Give it to me Baby with that funky chunk. Cocaine s a helluva a drug! 

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6 hours ago, Morpheus said:

Agreed and we've not even covered the likes of soul, funk and disco which was also a huge part of the 70's. Were all those tunes written by Adorno? 

 

Hell no, I know Rick James didn't have no Adorno write Give it to me Baby with that funky chunk. Cocaine s a helluva a drug! 

There were a lot of artist I hadn't mentioned, as well. The Mid-Seveties through the Eighties also brought us punk rock, rap, new wave.

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11 minutes ago, KingKitty said:

There were a lot of artist I hadn't mentioned, as well. The Mid-Seveties through the Eighties also brought us punk rock, rap, new wave.

I happen to think punk and rap were psyops! 🤣

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6 hours ago, alexa said:

 

Yes I agree with this concept but Adorno was part of a secret society who recognized his amazing skills in teaching/understanding classical music and put them to good use. Before his death in August 1969 (the very reason the Beatles disbanded, as their master composer was gone) Adorno wrote hundreds of songs to be distributed later (1969 – 1975) to various groups, that is why the early 70s music sounded so much better than the late 70s music, and the very reason why Led Zeppelin were musically dead after the last of the Adorno songs, KASHMIR, was included on Physical Graffiti.

 

 Theodor Adorno, a main figure in what became known as the Frankfurt School — proponents of an obscure academic approach to cultural criticism later branded “cultural Marxism” by communists annoyed they were too arty and not sufficiently doctrinaire — secretly wrote all the Beatles’ songs.

 

Controlled-

You basically repeat the same silliness with this reply. Jimmy Page, of Led Zeppelin, had been playing the guitar since he was a child, was a well respected studio musician for several years before playing in The Yardbyrds and Led Zeppelin. He was very much like a young Glen Campbell, here in the States. One of the main reasons music from the 60's and 70's were so incredible was due to "The Wrecking Crew", with Mr. Glen Campbell. What about the genius of Brian Wilson? All four mop tops AND George Martin combined couldn't come near his musical genius. Smokey Robinson? Burt Bacharach? Barry Manilow?

 

As stated before, there are only so many chords and scales, there will be musical pieces that will sound similar and even identical, as a result. Most rock 'n roll music is based on the Blues scales, minor Pentatonic scale, most heavy metal music is based on classical music scales. What would be more amazing would be if no song ever sounded like another previous song. 

 

 

 

Say what you will, I still love this demon worshiping, plagiarizing son of a bitch!

 

Got me one of them Danelectros, too!

 

 

Well, that's all from me on this topic. It's starting to get a bit silly in here.

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10 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

I happen to think punk and rap were psyops! 🤣

I didn't want to blow my cover, but it was I who wrote all those classic rap songs. I had been working for a covert team of secret military profane poets at the time. My Billy Squire album had a scratch on it, causing it to skip on his song, "The Big Beat" whilst I was reciting an ode to women with large backsides, and the rest history.

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6 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

I happen to think punk and rap were psyops! 🤣

 

Rap absolutely.

 

In "The Committee Of 300" Coleman writes that the planners wanted Americans in large cities to feel unsafe.

 

For that, street gangs had to start appearing everywhere.

 

And rap music was used to get young inner city Blacks and Hispanics to want to live "thug life" in an armed gang.

 

They also mandated constant news coverage of gang violence.

 

Apparently poor youths who were nobodies who saw that TV coverage wanted to join a gang, because you could end up on TV and appear dangerous.

 

According to Coleman, the planners let this go on for years, then sent out an order not to cover gang violence on TV anymore when the project was over.

 

The gangs started losing members, got smaller and smaller, and eventually disbanded.

 

Rap was softened and Gangster Rap stopped completely.

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