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Photos of the Earth and its beauty that inspire us


Bombadil
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Thought that with a lot of threads on here being quite heavy that it’s easy to forget about the incredible natural world around us. Or incredible illusion of reality if you prefer😁

I enjoy very much studying flora and fauna. Thought it would be nice to see photos we have taken of nature where we are.

Might encourage some to go out more and take a break from the toil of the current shite show going on. I’m especially interested in all forms of insects!

obviously don’t make it too obvious where you are peeps.

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@BombadilI think I've mentioned before that I am lucky enough to live a short walk away from the Shire Country Park in south Birmingham, named of course in honour of J.R.R. Tolkein who used to live locally in Moseley. I do take every opportunity to go and have a walk around, taking in the sights, sounds and smells, and observing the nature practically on my doorstep.

IMG_20220418_165433.jpg.49ba12a910a45fe4a66d3b8a84f990af.jpg

 

This for me is far more entertaining than watching the latest drivel on TV.

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1 minute ago, Grumpy Owl said:

@BombadilI think I've mentioned before that I am lucky enough to live a short walk away from the Shire Country Park in south Birmingham, named of course in honour of J.R.R. Tolkein who used to live locally in Moseley. I do take every opportunity to go and have a walk around, taking in the sights, sounds and smells, and observing the nature practically on my doorstep.

IMG_20220418_165433.jpg.49ba12a910a45fe4a66d3b8a84f990af.jpg

 

This for me is far more entertaining than watching the latest drivel on TV.

Looks great. Plenty of greenery to support insects etc. obviously supports fish as well.

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4 minutes ago, Fluke said:

Took this the other day. Beautiful open space round the back from me.

36.jpg

 

that's a fine wreck. If you can appreciate rust then you might enjoy this second instalment of a 3 part series looking at areas of scotland:

2/3 Meades, Off Kilter - Isle of Rust, 2009

 

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9 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

that's a fine wreck. If you can appreciate rust then you might enjoy this second instalment of a 3 part series looking at areas of scotland:

2/3 Meades, Off Kilter - Isle of Rust, 2009

 

On a serious note I did find this place not long back and recorded a short video. Tiny bit of woodland I like to go and sit quiet by the trees and also look for pottery and old relics.

 

 

Edited by Fluke
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3 minutes ago, Fluke said:

On a serious note I did find this place not long back and recorded a short video. Tiny bit of woodland I like to go and sit quiet by the trees and also look for pottery and old relics.

 

The garden of england...

 

 

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On 4/22/2022 at 11:01 AM, Bombadil said:

Might encourage some to go out more and take a break from the toil of the current shite show going on.

 

I'm still watching your azerbaijani lady cooking outside (she's amazing) and as you know i've been watching a lot of ray mears too. Here's part one of his wild britain series:

 

 

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2 hours ago, MarcusOmouse said:

apologies if this is not what you were looking for , but I often find that scenes from nature are best accompanied by musicl

Please forgive the source, but I make no apologies for the content.....

 

 

No this is perfect. I  would like this thread to be about the majesty of our Earth. Plus I love Pink Flloyd

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5 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

I'm still watching your azerbaijani lady cooking outside (she's amazing) and as you know i've been watching a lot of ray mears too. Here's part one of his wild britain series:

 

 

Have all his books and dvds. What il like the most is that he is very humble and seems genuinely a decent bloke. Also our own country seems to alway play second fiddle in documentaries  

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4 hours ago, Bombadil said:

Looks great. Plenty of greenery to support insects etc. obviously supports fish as well.

Actually glad to see some mosquitos coming in when i leave the the lights on and window open in the living room again, last year nothing seemed to happen. I also noticed way more ant activity around my city. This place is not nearly as green as that, but there is some room for nature and it always makes use of that. Cities are not necessarily bad, but there is an 'ideal size' of sorts for sure. I would not trade my current place for Shanghai unless you offered me enough money to get (and stay) out of there whenever i wanted, that is not how humans were supposed to live at all.

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Just now, jedidiah said:

 

I give up; what is it please?

That thing was spotted somewhere in alaska a week or two back, and no one seems to have a definitive answer yet, but some kind of experimental satellite crashing comes to mind for example? If it is natural then it's uhm.. not from here i would say?

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31 minutes ago, Bombadil said:

Have all his books and dvds. What il like the most is that he is very humble and seems genuinely a decent bloke. Also our own country seems to alway play second fiddle in documentaries  

 

He says british woodland is his favourite kind of wilderness.

 

20 years ago they found that body of a young boy in the thames and through analysis of his bones they could tell exactly where in africa he was from. The land you live in literally becomes part of you and mears is trying to shift peoples perceptions to see themselves as part of nature and not separate from it

 

I feel like we are at this stepping off point where we are looking into a future of transhumanism and some of us are stopping and looking back at the natural world and i feel we have to make a decision now. I think we have to choose one or the other. Some people might say 'why can't we continue as we are' but i think with the orchestrated food shortages we are going to be made to face a stark choice of whether or not to grow our own food or take whatever synthetic crap they try and palm off on us

Wildlife flourishes with return to sustainable farming

Published : 29 Aug 2018
1431815583863-nationaltrustrangermarkhip

A pioneering new project that involves reverting back to traditional 1940s farming methods has transformed a stretch of coastline into a haven for rare animals, birds and wildflowers – boosting numbers in some instances by more than 300 per cent.

The tried and tested ‘strip field’ farming involved flower crops being planted alongside more traditional arable crops and wildflower meadows across 45 hectares (111 acres) of farmland near the spectacular Worms Head in Rhossili, South Wales, cared for by the National Trust.

And, just two years after the project started, the stretch of coastline has been restored to its former glory and boasts a stunning array of rare birds such as the grasshopper warbler, common linnet and hen harriers.

Butterflies such as the small blue, grayling and wall brown butterflies have also returned to their former habitat.

It is hoped this approach to farming could be used by larger, more intensive farms.

Four National Trust rangers and 80 volunteers have spent the last 12 months faithfully recreating the 12th Century patchwork of fields on The Vile, creating 2,000 metres of new banks and new hedges which had previously been removed after the Second World War in favour of modern, intensive farming methods.

Instead of just six fields, there are now 17 which have been purposely planted with specially selected flowering crops to include 400,000 sunflowers, poppies, lavender and lupins which punctuate the crops of millet, wheat, oats, buckwheat, spelt, linseed and barley with ribbons of vibrant colour. 

These crop fields are now a haven for scarce wildflowers, such as cornflower and corn marigold.

An additional 7.5 hectares (19 acres) have been left as wildflower hay meadows with grasses and flora including oxeye daisy, yarrow and bird’s-foot trefoil. 

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/press-release/wildlife-flourishes-with-return-to-sustainable-farming-

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