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Is David Icke a Christian?


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I've been on a bit of a spiritual roller coaster ride the past few months. I feel like I'm living life a little more fully, a little more courageously, and have felt a stronger sense of peace for a variety of reasons.

 

I attend a church on a semi-regular basis and have mixed feelings about it. I do feel like my attending church has contributed to some of the positive changes in my life, along with my own determination to make some positive changes. 


The church pastor does occasionally contradict himself (the longer you attend a church the more often this will occur) and I am well versed in all of the criticisms of the historicity or lack thereof of christian origins.

 

However, since I feel better and am better in discernible ways, I follow my intuition and incorporate some church attendance into my routine. 

 

What's interesting is that David Icke has developed a much more sympathetic approach to christianity in recent years. In one recent interview he says his world view and that of christianity are basically one and the same, although of course couched in different terminology. David did not elaborate on how this was so, but alluded to the claim that both christians and himself both act fundamentally from a position of love, the foundation of which is pursuing truth and not being afraid to speak it and apply it, or something like that. 

 

I also sometimes stumble upon a christian author and their writings can sometimes make a lot of sense, again, from a primarily christian world view. David however is quick to point out that he is not a christian, but for whatever reasons, I am not as quick.

 

Anyway, I just wrote this up to express some ambivalence about how faith seems to be powerful even if logic dictates that it should not be. 

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1 hour ago, jjjamson said:

I've been on a bit of a spiritual roller coaster ride the past few months. I feel like I'm living life a little more fully, a little more courageously, and have felt a stronger sense of peace for a variety of reasons.

 

I attend a church on a semi-regular basis and have mixed feelings about it. I do feel like my attending church has contributed to some of the positive changes in my life, along with my own determination to make some positive changes. 


The church pastor does occasionally contradict himself (the longer you attend a church the more often this will occur) and I am well versed in all of the criticisms of the historicity or lack thereof of christian origins.

 

However, since I feel better and am better in discernible ways, I follow my intuition and incorporate some church attendance into my routine. 

 

What's interesting is that David Icke has developed a much more sympathetic approach to christianity in recent years. In one recent interview he says his world view and that of christianity are basically one and the same, although of course couched in different terminology. David did not elaborate on how this was so, but alluded to the claim that both christians and himself both act fundamentally from a position of love, the foundation of which is pursuing truth and not being afraid to speak it and apply it, or something like that. 

 

I also sometimes stumble upon a christian author and their writings can sometimes make a lot of sense, again, from a primarily christian world view. David however is quick to point out that he is not a christian, but for whatever reasons, I am not as quick.

 

Anyway, I just wrote this up to express some ambivalence about how faith seems to be powerful even if logic dictates that it should not be. 

 

Hi JJJamson

 

I wouldn't put down David as a Christian as he explains in one of his books about Horus & Set being on par with Jesus, which is kinda sad really. :classic_sad:

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3 minutes ago, alexa said:

 

Hi JJJamson

 

I wouldn't put down David as a Christian as he explains in one of his books about Horus & Set being on par with Jesus, which is kinda sad really. :classic_sad:

 

Does he not believe in the

'Christ Consiousness'... 

And the truths in the teachings of the Sermon on the Mount ? 

BC 

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1 minute ago, Basket Case said:

 

Does he not believe in the

'Christ Consiousness'... 

And the truths in the teachings of the Sermon on the Mount ? 

BC 

 

Not sure, does he ?

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David has spoken about the gnostics and their view of this reality as a kind of fallen version of a purer form of reality

 

He has also spoken about the gnostic archons as beings that are manipulating this reality

 

It appears davids view is very much one that if enough people can shift their perception they can elevate this world from its fallen state to something better

 

he has also spoken about 'satanism' so he recognises a movement that is in direct opposition to christianity and david is clearly also opposed to satanism

 

 

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David Icke does not subscribe to any religion which he considers conducive to postage stamp thinking. The most recent of DI's books I have is 'The Answer' (2020) and I searched for Christianity in the index which directed me to pages 177-8 where he has this to say.

 

Quote

The Cult first exploited religion as its perception deception in which deviating from the imposed belief proclaimed in a 'holy book' was a death sentence. This was the Postage Stamp Consensus of its day. Religion still continued the concept of life continuing after death, but included subordination to a schizophrenic 'God', both loving and vindictive, that invited those who believed in him to eternal paradise while condemning  non-believers to stoking the fires of hell forever. We are asked to believe that this eternal division was decided by 'God' on the basis of a brief life on Earth of anything from seconds to decades on a planet equivalent to a billionth of a pinhead. I don't know about you, but that makes perfect sense to me after a dozen gin and tonics with whisky chasers. Shockingly this belief still controls the perceptions (and the decoded experience) of billions.

 

It could be said that, when it comes to his views on Christianity, it is the Roman Church he is criticising and perhaps he may have more sympathy towards early Christian beliefs before they were corrupted. This may align with BC's suggestion of 'Christ Consciousness' above.

 

DI seems more inclined towards Gnosticism and oft compares the 'God' of the Old Testament to the Gnostic Demiurge Yaldaboath who was the chief Archon. DI's more recent works have been significantly influenced by Gnostic beliefs whereby he tells us that this reality has been hacked by the Archons who have formed an illusory matrix of control which is kept in place by deliberately limiting our human perception. But I would hesitate to say he subscribes whole-heartedly to this philosophy either, but rather takes from it what he perceives to be true alongside elements from other belief systems.

 

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23 hours ago, jjjamson said:

I've been on a bit of a spiritual roller coaster ride the past few months. I feel like I'm living life a little more fully, a little more courageously, and have felt a stronger sense of peace for a variety of reasons.

 

I attend a church on a semi-regular basis and have mixed feelings about it. I do feel like my attending church has contributed to some of the positive changes in my life, along with my own determination to make some positive changes. 


The church pastor does occasionally contradict himself (the longer you attend a church the more often this will occur) and I am well versed in all of the criticisms of the historicity or lack thereof of christian origins.

 

However, since I feel better and am better in discernible ways, I follow my intuition and incorporate some church attendance into my routine. 

 

What's interesting is that David Icke has developed a much more sympathetic approach to christianity in recent years. In one recent interview he says his world view and that of christianity are basically one and the same, although of course couched in different terminology. David did not elaborate on how this was so, but alluded to the claim that both christians and himself both act fundamentally from a position of love, the foundation of which is pursuing truth and not being afraid to speak it and apply it, or something like that. 

 

I also sometimes stumble upon a christian author and their writings can sometimes make a lot of sense, again, from a primarily christian world view. David however is quick to point out that he is not a christian, but for whatever reasons, I am not as quick.

 

Anyway, I just wrote this up to express some ambivalence about how faith seems to be powerful even if logic dictates that it should not be. 

David Icke said he believes that the story of Jesus is just a sun sign story told over and over again. That Orisis, Mithra and all tell the same thing that the story of Jesus simply retells.

 

As far as Gnosticism. It is only for ADVANCED studiers. These people up here are incorrect on Gnosticism. I am Gnostic-Christian and HELL NO Yaldaboath is not the Archon of Gnosticism. He is said to declare himself as "god" and rebelled against the Divine Authority and fell.

 

A conflict broke out between him and his mother who tried to get her light back. But we DO know that the gods of Judaism are simply demons.

In truth Judaism is simply Satanism, Christianity is the religion of Salvation but Gnosticism isn't really a religion. It just explains certain past faiths, their spirituality, the evils of Judaism and that Jesus conquers Satan in the end.

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1 hour ago, Ibizan Hound said:

In truth Judaism is simply Satanism

 

So if I understand this correctly, then Jesus is the son of satan?

Never been a bible-basher, but everything Jesus said  as  the most noteworthy and genuine jew (to my mind) makes perfect sense to myself and most other normal human beings.

 

What those who speak, seemingly as representatives of judaism  these days strikes me as the polar opposite?

Could you clear that up for me please ?

 

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16 minutes ago, Ibizan Hound said:

You have POOR reading comprehension skills

OK.  I can accept that.

So can you answer the question in a way that I might understand ?

As I understand it, those people who, by their deeds are   the polar opposite of what Jesus would understand to be jewish are actually claiming to be Jewish ?

How does that work exactly?

 

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6 hours ago, Ibizan Hound said:

As far as Gnosticism. It is only for ADVANCED studiers. These people up here are incorrect on Gnosticism. I am Gnostic-Christian and HELL NO Yaldaboath is not the Archon of Gnosticism. He is said to declare himself as "god" and rebelled against the Divine Authority and fell.

 

Thank you for your advanced insight, but I am at a loss as to how you have concluded that Yaldabaoth was not an Archon which is a Greek word that means ruler.

 

Frederik Wisse's translation of 'The Apocryphon of John', part of the Nag Hammadi texts, seems pretty clear on this point so I cannot find an error in how David Icke has incorporated this into his work.

 

http://www.gnosis.org/naghamm/apocjn.html

 

According to this translation, when Sophia conceived of creating a being herself which then manifested as Yaldabaoth, the "first archon", it took an ugly form.

 

Quote

And when she saw (the consequences of) her desire, it changed into a form of a lion-faced serpent. And its eyes were like lightning fires which flash. She cast it away from her, outside that place, that no one of the immortal ones might see it, for she had created it in ignorance. And she surrounded it with a luminous cloud, and she placed a throne in the middle of the cloud that no one might see it except the holy Spirit who is called the mother of the living. And she called his name Yaltabaoth.

 

This is the first archon who took a great power from his mother. And he removed himself from her and moved away from the places in which he was born. He became strong and created for himself other aeons with a flame of luminous fire which (still) exists now. And he joined with his arrogance which is in him and begot authorities for himself.

 

The text then lists the array of additional Archons which Yaldabaoth created as his servants. There were twelve - seven to rule as heavenly kings and five to reign over the dark abyss. Following the genesis of material "reality", Yaldabaoth, "the archon", takes all credit for its creation.

 

Quote

Now the archon who is weak has three names. The first name is Yaltabaoth, the second is Saklas, and the third is Samael. And he is impious in his arrogance which is in him. For he said, 'I am God and there is no other God beside me,' for he is ignorant of his strength, the place from which he had come.

 

Do you dispute this translation of the Nag Hammadi texts and, if so, can you source and proffer a better understanding?

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1 hour ago, Mitochondrial Eve said:

 

Thank you for your advanced insight, but I am at a loss as to how you have concluded that Yaldabaoth was not an Archon which is a Greek word that means ruler.

Yaldabaoth means 'Son of Chaos' because his rebellion caused war in Heaven. He was a rebel  As far as evil Archons, it's the Christians who say the devil was second next to God before he revolted thus being an Archon.

 

In Gnosticism this isn't the claim. He was simply a powerful rebel. 

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To my understanding, David Icke is not a Christian, nor does he associate himself with any religious dogma. After reading a couple of his books and watching many of his videos, he strikes me as being Spiritual in the context of Quantum Reality. I’ve heard him discuss all of the items listed below and these concepts are all explained thru the Quantum Field; not by religious beliefs.  

 

Oneness and Quantum Entanglement – We are All connected

The Matrix – Holographic Reality

Shifting in and out of Dimensions 

How Frequencies effect us

Looking at things thru the Prism of Possibilities and Probabilities

Our Ability to Create Our Own Reality

That what we perceive as empty space is actually not empty  

 That The Source is Within Us

That we have the ability to influence “the field” thru the human heart and mind

That we are a biological computer system

That we are Electrical and Light Beings

 

 

For a much deeper dive into Quantum Reality, Watch “What the Bleep Do We Know”

 

 

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