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The Jungle Book as an allegory for political society & the conflicts between man & nature


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Just now, RobSS said:

 

I was hoping you'd have interesting insights to share. No problem!

 

Hope for the best and not what some random blogger types. Focus on your research and I'll focus on mine. Ta

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3 minutes ago, Shake said:

Hope for the best and not what some random blogger types. Focus on your research and I'll focus on mine. Ta

 

Not sure what random blogs have got to do with anything here or why you joined the discussion as you haven't shared much, but all the best!

 

 

Edited by RobSS
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2 minutes ago, RobSS said:

 

Not sure why you joined the discussion as you haven't shared much, but all the best!

 

 

So you don't know about subliminal messages in Disney cartoons? I don't want to post links...however they are out there. I don't need to post information to suit your gratitude. Be humble and not demand answers. This is not a game. Be nice 

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10 minutes ago, Shake said:

So you don't know about subliminal messages in Disney cartoons? I don't want to post links...however they are out there. I don't need to post information to suit your gratitude. Be humble and not demand answers. This is not a game. Be nice 

 

Of course I know about subliminal messages - it's nothing new and has been discussed a lot over the years here on the forum. There have been no subliminal images or suggestions in this thread, so you can relax, no one is forcing you to post information, so no need to make false assumptions, and I'm not sure what your previous comment about random blogs have got to do with anything here. No one here is not being nice to you either, and no one has said it's a game. I bid you well. Have a good one!

 

Oh la, la!

 

Edited by RobSS
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On 1/18/2022 at 4:43 PM, RobSS said:

 

Of course I know about subliminal messages - it's nothing new and has been discussed a lot over the years here on the forum. There have been no subliminal images or suggestions in this thread, so you can relax, no one is forcing you to post information, so no need to make false assumptions, and I'm not sure what your previous comment about random blogs have got to do with anything here. No one here is not being nice to you either, and no one has said it's a game. I bid you well. Have a good one!

 

Oh la, la!

 

In your defense, I must point out, you only suggested the story, "The Jungle Book", not the Disney adaptation(s). Disney did not create the story, therefore, reducing this thread to a discussion of Disney is moot. At least I hope so, since I've never had the opportunity to use the word "moot" before and already today I've used it twice. 

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5 minutes ago, KingKitty said:

In your defense, I must point out, you only suggested the story, "The Jungle Book", not the Disney adaptation(s). Disney did not create the story, therefore, reducing this thread to a discussion of Disney is moot. At least I hope so, since I've never had the opportunity to use the word "moot" before and already today I've used it twice. 

 

I was intending the thread to be about the story and the allegory. Hoot the moot and thanks!

 

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On 1/18/2022 at 9:29 PM, RobSS said:

Mowgli represents humanity that wants to live in a society that's not only in harmony with nature, but which is also not interested in colonialism and fighting wars based on lies and deceptions.

 

 

How does Mowgli represent a humanity that wants to live in nature? He didn't 'want' to, he was lost and then got raised by wolves.

 

I like nature, wolves, etc. Not sure about the anti-tiger sentiment though....

 

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3 hours ago, Firebird said:

 

How does Mowgli represent a humanity that wants to live in nature? He didn't 'want' to, he was lost and then got raised by wolves.

 

 

Mowgli became friends with the animals. As he grew older, he didn't collaborate with humans who wanted to cause trouble in the jungle, and the animals that helped Mowgli develop human-like qualities, so it was a mutually beneficial relationship.

 

3 hours ago, Firebird said:

 

I like nature, wolves, etc. Not sure about the anti-tiger sentiment though....

 

 

I love real tigers, but I writing about a metaphor... referring in particular to the 1942 Technicolor action-adventure film version of "The Jungle Book", directed by Zoltan Korda. In this film, Shere Khan is portrayed as Cain, who as described in the book of Genesis, killed his brother, Able. In the introduction to the film, the narrator describes Shere Khan:


"The Tiger - the killer the man eater, the villain who first brought murder to the jungle clan - Shere Khan.


It's said that in his first kill, when he was Cain to some poor Able of the glades, when he ran from the scene of his crime, the trees and creepers whipped him with their branches and striped his yellow hide with the mark of Cain. This evil lord must have his dish-lickers his bullies for attendants; the jackal and the hyena, hungry for the scraps of the murderous master's feast." (from the 1942 version of "The Jungle Book", directed by Zoltan Korda)


Max Heindel, an American occultist, astrologer, mystic and Rosicrucian, wrote that Freemasonry originated with Cain, who was "the son of a widow". He wrote, "They have lost their spiritual sight and are imprisoned in the forehead of the body where it is said Cain was marked; they must wander as prodigal sons in the comparative darkness of the material world, oblivious to their high and noble estate..."


At the end of the Disney story, the jungle is severely damaged by a fire. Mowgli is confronted by Shere Khan, but Mowgli sets fire to his tail. Shere Khan, terrified of fire, runs away.

 

 

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If a child doesn't hear and learn language before a certain age they are never able to learn to speak

 

A scottish king once wanted to know what the original language was which he believed was the language of the angels so he found a mother who was dumb (ie she couldn't speak)  and he confined her and her baby to an island in the firth of forth where she then had to live and raise the child

 

Food was taken out to them but people were forbidden to talk to them. The child never learned to talk.

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The Jungle Book is about the life of Mowgli, from the time he was a baby, his life as a wild boy, to the time he became an adult and a man, so the story is not just about a child.

 

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8 minutes ago, RobSS said:

The Jungle Book is about the life of Mowgli, from the time he was a baby, his life as a wild boy, to the time he became an adult and a man, so the story is not just about a child.

 

he wouldn't be able to speak once he got back into the world of men

 

i think there was an actual case of children raised by wolves in india

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3 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

he wouldn't be able to speak once he got back into the world of men

 

i think there was an actual case of children raised by wolves in india

 

What's to stop a grown man learning? But the story is a metaphor. The important thing is that he found love. Same is true with the endings of other stories of a fairy tale nature, like the Prince in Sleeping Beauty, who also found love.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, RobSS said:

What's to stop a grown man learning?

 

its to do with how your brain forms. If you have not developed language by.....i want to say 6-7 years of age (but you'd need to check that), then you never will

 

its a use it or lose it type deal

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20 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

its to do with how your brain forms. If you have not developed language by.....i want to say 6-7 years of age (but you'd need to check that), then you never will

 

its a use it or lose it type deal

 

If a metaphor is taken too literally the meaning will be lost.

 

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13 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

you know another metaphorical childrens work written by a freemason was 'pinocchio'

 

Yes, I'm going to do a similar summary about the hidden messages in Pinocchio as well because like "The Jungle Book", Pinocchio too is a metaphor. I've been studying the story since the 1990's.

 

Pinocchio spent time in a whale. Manly P. Hall explains here the occult meaning of Whale symbolism:

 

"When used as a symbol of evil, the fish represented the earth (man's lower nature) and the tomb (the sepulcher of the Mysteries). Thus was Jonah three days in the belly of the "great fish," as Christ was three days in the tomb. Several early church fathers believed that the "whale" which swallowed Jonah was the symbol of God the Father, who, when the hapless prophet was thrown overboard, accepted Jonah into His own nature until a place of safety was reached. The story of Jonah is really a legend of initiation into the Mysteries, and the "great fish" represents the darkness of ignorance which engulfs man when he is thrown over the side of the ship (is born) into the sea (life)." (Manly P. Hall, The Secret Teachings of All Ages)

 

Edited by RobSS
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1 minute ago, Macnamara said:

 

they've been shaping popular culture for a long time

 

walt disney was a member of the de molay society

 

Beethoven and Mozart were also in the Fraternity, but being a member doesn't automatically  make a person bad or evil. Same with Kipling, I don't think he was a bad person. I've met Masons who were friendlier than some Christians I've known.

 

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2 minutes ago, RobSS said:

Beethoven and Mozart were also in the Fraternity,

 

mozarts wife believed he was poisoned

 

2 minutes ago, RobSS said:

but being a member doesn't automatically  make a person bad or evil. Same with Kipling, I don't think he was a bad person. I've met Masons who were friendlier than some Christians I've known.

 

perhaps these days you are more mason than christian?

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Just now, Macnamara said:

 

mozarts wife believed he was poisoned

 

It's possible,but there's only speculation.

 

Just now, Macnamara said:

 

perhaps these days you are more mason than christian?

 

 

It's never even crossed my mind to join. I'm not the kind of person to join any group or party.

 

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14 minutes ago, RobSS said:

being a member doesn't automatically  make a person bad or evil

 

and whilst the satanists jabbed their gene altering poison into my countrymen and women, where are all the good freemasons pushing back against that?

 

the top hospitals are a hotbed of freemasonry

Edited by Macnamara
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Just now, Macnamara said:

 

he said that the whole universe is a lodge

 

You may have misunderstood what he said. I'd like to see the quote and the context., but regardless, not all masons are bad or evil.

 

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