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Under the care of the NHS


RobSS
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When I came into this world, I only wanted a quiet life, but later this morning I have to have an operation at a hospital just round the corner from Tottenham Court Rd, in London's West End. and my life will be in the hands of our national health service, which I hope is still ours. It's at times like this when one contemplates what life's really  about, but I'm sure all's for the best in the best of all possible worlds. Now leaving for the hospital... It'll be interesting to see how it operates from the inside in these interesting times.

 

I wish you all the best today.

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9 hours ago, RobSS said:

When I came into this world, I only wanted a quiet life, but later this morning I have to have an operation at a hospital just round the corner from Tottenham Court Rd, in London's West End. and my life will be in the hands of our national health service, which I hope is still ours. It's at times like this when one contemplates what life's really  about, but I'm sure all's for the best in the best of all possible worlds. Now leaving for the hospital... It'll be interesting to see how it operates from the inside in these interesting times.

 

I wish you all the best today.

 

I've only been in hospital once.... with glandular fever..... I was at St Barth's hospital and my ward was fairly small and seemed to be part of the ancient hospital which gave onto a ancient leafy monastic cloister which was quiet and sheltered from the rest of London and the day was gently punctuated by the pealing of the old Bells of St Bartholomew the Great.

 

I actually really enjoyed it. I seem to remember the food wasn't bad at all either.....

 

I hope things go well for you and you can draw something good from the experience...


There is always something good in the most unfortunate of circumstances.....that is the grace of God for those who are awake to his presence.

 

 

Edited by Truthspoon
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Thank you TS, Ethel and itsa.

 

I had the anaesthetic at midday, woke up 3 hours later, and was back home by around 5:30pm. It was a for a realignment of my big toe on my right foot, which involved the surgeon having to break a bone. I'll have to take 3 months off work, and remain at home to let the foot heal for most of that time.

 

As far as the care and service I received today is concerned, I'd say 12 out of 10, and five gold stars. They really were professional, efficient, warm and friendly.

 

When I arrived at reception, I was asked to wear as mask, but I smiled and said, "I'm exempt", and that was that. After a short while, they ushered me through to the operating theatre waiting area. They didn't even ask me to sanitise my hands.

 

Sadly, I know not all hospitals are not like that, but UCH has a very good reputation.

 

Never had an op before, so it was quite daunting, especially being in the anaesthetic room, and then waking up in the post-op ward, which seemed like just a second later! I vaguely remember having dreams but I can't say for certain, so not sure. All I remember was the nurse saying, "Think of nice things", as I slipped under, and then in the next moment, as I opened my eyes, a nurse saying, "Are you okay?"

 

 

 

Edited by RobSS
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Last time I had an operation about 10 years ago got to admit I was shitting it.

I remember laying on the bed in pre op room seriously thinking about just getting up and leaving.

Then they injected me with something and all of a sudden I didn't really care about much lol. Waking up on morphine was the best bit.

 

After I wondered if the stuff they injected me with was the drug Michael Jackson was on, definitely wasn't morphine.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Itsa said:

 

Last time I had an operation about 10 years ago got to admit I was shitting it.

I remember laying on the bed in pre op room seriously thinking about just getting up and leaving.

 

 

I felt just the same - a last minute escape bid when it dawns on you just what you've let yourself in for!

 

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Thanks EW.

 

In the 70's and early '80's, the NHS and the welfare state were considered a jewel in the country's crown that people were generally very proud of. It was the Clement Attlee government that greatly expanded the welfare state just after WWII, in 1946, in an endeavour to create a New Jerusalem and a prosperous egalitarian society. People believed the country had turned a corner, and had faith in its future. Despite all the challenges of the '70's, there was a feeling world wars were a thing of the past, and people were confident of a peaceful future. Working class families could own a coloured TV, and for the first time, fly abroad for holidays. The future looked even brighter in the early '80's. If you found yourself out of a job, you could sign on with very few questions asked, for as long was necessary, and there was a vibrant cultural scene. There was a great deal of hope in the future.

 

Of course, it turned out to be a fool's paradise. I was aware I was living in very unique and privileged period, but at the back of my mind, I also knew that the New Jerusalem had not come, and that we were not free of the threat of tyranny, and another global challenge. We're now in the midst of a global challenge, but I think this will be the last, and then what people experienced in the 80's will be the beginning of something real.

 

 

Edited by RobSS
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  • 2 weeks later...

I haven't gone out the front door and left my apartment since Thursday, 11th November - a week and a half ago. How is the world? When I do finally go out, it'll be interesting to see if people have changed, something that wouldn't be obvious going out everyday.

 

I've discovered I'm allergic to codeine... I was given co-codamol (a mixture of paracetamol and codeine) as a pain killer, which I had an allergic reaction to. I had a medium strength anaphylactic shock.

 

When the anaesthetic from the operation wore off, I took two tablets of co-codamol when I got home. I took two tablets later, just before going to bed, and two tablets when I woke up in the morning - so six tablets in total. An hour later, I wanted to throw up but couldn't, and then experienced hives, facial swelling, and a slight temperature. All the symptoms abated within a few hours and were more or less gone within 24 hours - all about a week and a half ago, and I've been okay since. 

 

Ironically, when the anaesthetic from the operation wore off, I didn't feel much pain in my foot, but I took the co-codamol just in case. When I woke up, I still didn't experience much pain (only the discomfort from a lot of swelling), so I didn't really need to take any painkillers at all, and I wish I hadn't because the co-codamol gave me more discomfort and inconvenience than the operation itself !!!

 

Apparently, codeine can become extremely advective, and has caused a lot of people, who've become addicted to it, a great deal of misery.

 

 

Edited by RobSS
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Hi Robs,


for healing it is better when you dont feel pain.

Novalgin is a medicament which is often given after surgery.
I take it when I have headache and it is better than Ibu.
Its always the dose that makes the toxin - you should not endure pain cause the brain has a remembrance on it

I do it often too when I have headache but it is not good.

 

Anyways, I hope your foot is healed now 😊

Edited by Moonlight
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Hi Moonlight,

 

Apologies for the delayed reply! The foot's doing very well thanks.  The biggest issue so far was the allergic reaction to the codeine based Co-codamol - apart from that, I haven't experienced any significant pain. Looking forwards to running and jumping as soon as it's better.

 

Thanks for your comments about painkillers and your suggestion for an alternative. I came across a little snippet in The Week magazine (24/11/21), about a "leaf that is as good as ibuprofen". Sounds promising.

 

I notice you haven't been posting much recently. I hope all's well with you, and that you'll still visit - I miss your posts! 😊

 

Here's a scan of the aforementioned leaf article...

142826109_Theleafthatisasgoodasibuprofen(TheWeek24_11.21).jpg.20d0cf2f3ade21903d4e3a9c189c4d28.jpg

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Moonlight said:

Hi Robs 😊

 

thank you for liking my posts. 🪶🪶

You are from London? Me too.....well I was so often there 😄

 

Hi Moonlight, how are you? Yes, I live in Shoreditch, in central London. Which part of London were you in?

 

 

 

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