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Effective Self Defence


Shining-one
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6 minutes ago, DarianF said:

Check out the wrist locks, arm locks, etc. Valuable to know.

 

i did courses in some of that in the NHS working in psychatric hospitals

 

in truth i always forgot the stuff pretty quickly because the courses were only done, at the most, every 6 months

 

so the takeaway lesson i got from that is that if you actually intend to use something in a dangerous situation you had better have used it a thousand times previously so that you've got it dialled in because in the heat of the moment you won't have time to think about it and that's why i'm saying that a person who is serious about training should spar and often (which is not easy to do....cos you're gonna get bruised!)

 

But if you're not getting bruised and wiring that instinct then in a breakdown everything you thought you knew will just go out the window, which is why running is a good option

Edited by Macnamara
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I studied Shotokan and Wado Ryu karate in my younger days.

 

I had a Japanese Wado instructor (female) who taught me how to do a reverse punch (gyaku-zuki) through a thick block of wood. I was told to aim the end of the punch about 1 or 2 inches past the block and to punch for that point. First punch went through like a hot knife through butter! It really is mind over matter and applied physics (large force over a small area - two knuckles). However, this isn't self defence, it's more for show.

 

I was always taught that the best defence was to learn just a handful of techniques that work really well for YOU. Then, when being attacked, yes, you may take some hard knocks at first depending on the skill of your opponent, but you only need that split second of opportunity to deliver one of your few killer moves and that could well be the end of the fight. You don't need to worry about not being able to kick well or punch hard, just learn the stuff that you do best and stick to that.

 

Sometimes the slightest of moves can disable an unskilled opponent- such as dislocating his knee with a foot sweep when all of his weight is on one leg while stupidly trying to kick you. Stranglehold? Simply cupping your hands and slapping them over his ears simultaneously can cause him immense pain. Karate + Aikido will supply you with the killer moves you need for most unarmed situations.

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3 minutes ago, webtrekker said:

I studied Shotokan and Wado Ryu karate in my younger days.

 

I studied running

 

i did a lot of running when i was younger. I once ran so hard that i puked but the guy never got a single hit on me. That was good self defence

Edited by Macnamara
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de-escalation

15 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

you become what you do

 

if you want to prepare for striking and being struck then you need to do something where you are striking and being struck

 

mixed martial arts threw all the styles in a ring and the ones that were left standing were: boxing, muay thai and brazilian ju jitsu

 

If you look at the fighters profiles they pretty much all combine BJJ with muay thai because they teach you to grapple, clinch, to kick and punch and those disciplines all involve no nonsense sparring

 

Communication and de-escalation training is also essential. A lot of people overlook that. Just because you can fight, it doesn't mean you have to. And if you can't fight, even more important to learn effective de-escalation.

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One thing I would add is that in general, most people who are trained fighters are the last people you need to worry about. A trained and disciplined fighter doesn't go around picking fights. It's mostly the random morons, or the drunken idiots, or the wannabe tough guys. So the odds are in your favour in this respect. If the worst happens and you end up in a confrontation, it's highly likely the person or persons you are dealing with actually in reality has no idea what they are doing. So even some basic skills might be enough to get you out of trouble.

 

It's highly unlikely a professional kickboxer is going to attack you, for example.

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3 minutes ago, DarianF said:

de-escalation

 

Communication and de-escalation training is also essential. A lot of people overlook that. Just because you can fight, it doesn't mean you have to. And if you can't fight, even more important to learn effective de-escalation.

 

There was a clip on RT recently of this mixed martial artist in a bar and he walked upto and bumped into this guy who he had maybe taken a dislike to. But anyway the MMA fighter totally created the situation out of nothing.

 

The guy objected to being shoved by him and the MMA fighter unleashed a flurry of punches and knocked the guy out. The unsuspecting guy just had no idea that he was getting himself into a situation where the other guy was essentially looking for a fight. It was all over in an instant

 

These days also there seem to be less people who want a 'square go' and more people who just want to stab you or jump on your head

 

So really in most situations you've gotta just ask yourself it ifs worth it or if you should just walk (or run till you puke)

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10 minutes ago, DarianF said:

It's highly unlikely a professional kickboxer is going to attack you, for example.

 

True. If my karate instructor even got wind of me using my skills to bully others I would have been made an example of in front of the whole cless then kicked out. Martial arts teach you respect above anything else.

 

On a different topic, weapons, I'd generally not recommend using any weapon to defend yourself as it could easily be taken from you and used against you. Saying that, I have some heavy nunchuks which I keep under the bed. I made them years ago from the thick end of 2 pool cues and affixed swivels and a decent chain. They are POWERFUL! I should know, as I've hit myself many times with them during practice!

Edited by webtrekker
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3 minutes ago, webtrekker said:

 I have some heavy nunchuks which I keep under the bed. I made them years ago from the thick end of 2 pool cues and affixed swivels and a decent chain. They are POWERFUL! I should know, as I've hit myself many times with them during practice!

 

do you wear a crotch guard?

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7 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

do you wear a crotch guard?

 

Nope. Never worn any protection. That's why karate for instance is taught on hard wooden floors (usually school or church hall). The reasoning behind it is so that you can respond to an attack in any situation, ie. straight out of bed with bare feet in the middle of the night. All of this padded stuff: gloves, floor mats, gum shields etc is for sport, not self defense.

 

Mind you, a 'Glasgow Kiss', uppercut, punch to the throat, or a kick in the nuts will suffice in 90% of the cases!

 

Edited by webtrekker
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10 minutes ago, webtrekker said:

 

Nope. Never worn any protection. That's why karate for instance is taught on hard wooden floors (usually school or church hall). The reasoning behind it is so that you can respond to an attack in any situation, ie. straight out of bed with bare feet in the middle of the night. All of this padded stuff: gloves, floor mats, gum shields etc is for sport, not self defense.

 

Mind you, a 'Glasgow Kiss', uppercut, punch to the throat, or a kick in the nuts will suffice in 90% of the cases!

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, DarianF said:

One thing I would add is that in general, most people who are trained fighters are the last people you need to worry about. A trained and disciplined fighter doesn't go around picking fights. It's mostly the random morons, or the drunken idiots, or the wannabe tough guys. So the odds are in your favour in this respect. If the worst happens and you end up in a confrontation, it's highly likely the person or persons you are dealing with actually in reality has no idea what they are doing. So even some basic skills might be enough to get you out of trouble.

 

It's highly unlikely a professional kickboxer is going to attack you, for example.

A friend got into a fight a few years he was telling me, the opponent kept pulling his arm back before punching and telegraphing every shot, so my mate just blocked him until he tired out then walked away.

Didn't hit back or bully the other guy though he easily could have bashed him, I said to him then that was very honourable. 

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12 hours ago, Macnamara said:

 

I studied running

 

i did a lot of running when i was younger. I once ran so hard that i puked but the guy never got a single hit on me. That was good self defence

 

My stepfather was in the regular army and became a PT instructor, he stated boxing and judo were the most effective.

He got promoted, didnt like it so got the squad he was instructing to march over the officers immaculate rose gardens repeatedly.

 

But his final statement on the best defence was to use your legs

 

Run.

 

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8 hours ago, shadowmoon said:

A friend got into a fight a few years he was telling me, the opponent kept pulling his arm back before punching and telegraphing every shot, so my mate just blocked him until he tired out then walked away.

Didn't hit back or bully the other guy though he easily could have bashed him, I said to him then that was very honourable. 

 

Knowing the law is also important. You have the right to self defense, as long as it's reasonable and proportionate. Unfortuntely, some people just go too far instead of walking away.

 

Your mate did well. But yes that's the point I was making. 99% of the time you'll just be dealing with some untrained yobbo. I think your chances of running into a random attack situation from an actual trained fighter is remote. Not impossible of course, but unlikely.

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43 minutes ago, DarianF said:

 

Knowing the law is also important. You have the right to self defense, as long as it's reasonable and proportionate. Unfortuntely, some people just go too far instead of walking away.

 

Your mate did well. But yes that's the point I was making. 99% of the time you'll just be dealing with some untrained yobbo. I think your chances of running into a random attack situation from an actual trained fighter is remote. Not impossible of course, but unlikely.

Yep, self defence is not punching someone over then kicking their head repeatedly on the ground. 

 

Most martial artists I have met have been chilled people, my old club had one prick who wanted to learn to attack people and had bullied one of the students at school years before.

So the the sensei politely asked him to gtfo and not return.. Ever.. Strangely enough he never returned 😁

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Now that I'm an old bat I've got quite chunky so if we have to eat each other I could feed a family of 6 for a week. But I don't half have a high kick. It's my party piece like Jean-Claude Van Damme! I could dislocate a jaw with my projectile Croc.

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On 8/2/2021 at 10:23 PM, Shining-one said:

I'm a fan of Bruce Lee. Bruce had an early grasp of how to discard what's not direct. I have footage of Bruce watching the American Karate tournaments in despair. No contact at all and very rigid. Bruce was teaching his students to progress pretty quickly and mixed a lot of styles together.
Still, any martial art purely as a sport still gets you fit. Just being mobile and active is a big plus. Suggestions:
Wing Chun
Tai Kwon Do
Tang Soo Do
Kung Fu
Jeet Kune Do
Kickboxing
Wrestling
Boxing
Savate
Karate
Kickboxing
Judo

When I was younger I did a lot of martial arts. Started with Kyu-shin-do kiddy Judo, moved onto Tang-Soo-Do, then went Jeet Kune Do for a few years.

 

JKD was definitely the best for self defence and incorporated a lot of useful stuff from other styles. Dirty street boxing.

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And yet.....
How much wood would a wood-chucker chuck, if a wood-chucker could Chuck Norris?
Norris did Tang Soo Do and, not wanting to be cruel, his martial arts were always impressive but his acting, as wooden as an oak barn-door. Some of the old Norris martial arts movies are worth watching such as Silent Rage or Lone Wolf Mcquade or Eye For An Eye. Just the fact when Norris utters dialogue, he always looks like a rank novice compared to the other actor. It's as if he's reading his lines from a hand-held placard.
The other big name was John Saxon who did Shotokan Karate and starred in Enter The Dragon. As well as appearances in the Kung Fu TV series and Six Million Dollar Man. Finally he made his name in Nightmare On Elm Street as the cop.

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Just conditioning alone is hard. I missed my bike session today due to unheard-of rain. I thought of riding anyway but it was horrendous. Normally I ride an old MTB up two steep hills and pretend I'm being chased. Really gets the pulse banging and lungs working. I use a biggish gear to make it hard. After that I do abs and other free exercises. The following day it's stretches, balance, dynamic development. All of it sensible, given my age. Years ago it was all big weights and heavy lifts but so many bodybuilders died around 60. Very many needed hip and knee surgery. My golden rule these days is to ditch ego and gently work up the exercise.
The bad news is I was defeated some weeks ago by a cyclist who overtook me up the hills. Then again, some cyclists do a lot of miles and are pretty light. Still it made me feel a little older.
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Good self defence is determined by age ,gender, fitness levels etc. 

 

First of all strengthen the body then learn strikes and grappling and anti grappling. 

 

Depending which country you live in the Gun will be number 1 for self defence. 

 

So much bullshit in the martial arts look at early ufc the absolute fighting championships and the one's who won were the one's who had good striking and grappling ki breathing etc never even a mention.

 

 

Edited by JONJAY79
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On 8/1/2021 at 7:13 PM, Shining-one said:

It's about conditioning. Not years doing grades. You take what's necessary. In case of standard karate, I'd back a decent boxer, due to the actual contact and conditioning. Having said that some Shaolin monks did serious conditioning to rival any marines program. Practically boxing and judo would go well together but conditioning is always a plus. Many martial arts are more sport orientated but do increase fitness.

 

Boxing and judo are real martial arts. To many call themselves martial arts but will very rarely protect you schools like aikido, tai chi many kung fu schools even traditional Japanese jujitsu. 

 

I've done martial arts for decades and feel like I learnt more in 6 yrs of Brazilian jiujitsu than I did in decades of learning kung fu ,aikido, systema. 

Edited by JONJAY79
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On 8/1/2021 at 7:13 PM, Shining-one said:

It's about conditioning. Not years doing grades. You take what's necessary. In case of standard karate, I'd back a decent boxer, due to the actual contact and conditioning. Having said that some Shaolin monks did serious conditioning to rival any marines program. Practically boxing and judo would go well together but conditioning is always a plus. Many martial arts are more sport orientated but do increase fitness.

 

Boxing and judo are real martial arts. To many call themselves martial arts but will very rarely protect you schools like aikido, tai chi many kung fu schools even traditional jujitsu. 

 

I've done martial arts for decades and feel like I learnt more in 6 yrs of Brazilian jiujitsu than I did in decades of learning kung fu ,aikido, systema. 

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