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SimonTV

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Did you see the new aquaman film it has a globalist global warming plot? The bad guy is trying to heat the planet to kill everyone and the end Atlantis exposes itself to humans and they use all this pro global government propaganda. like global solutions etc. One line the guy makes a joke about global warming like how could you think it's not true... 

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5 hours ago, SimonTV said:

Did you see the new aquaman film it has a globalist global warming plot? The bad guy is trying to heat the planet to kill everyone and the end Atlantis exposes itself to humans and they use all this pro global government propaganda. like global solutions etc. One line the guy makes a joke about global warming like how could you think it's not true... 

 

No, I haven't seen that film, though I have seen adverts plastered over bus stops.

 

I did notice that Aquaman is played by actor Jason Momoa, who played a key role in the Stargate: Atlantis TV series from several years ago, if that is of any relevance.

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On 12/19/2023 at 10:51 AM, Talorgan said:

 

Beware of globalresearch, they run cover for certain people and will only give you part of the picture. There is truth in their club of Rome statement, but it's not all Edom, and these scoundrel Duginists don't like to reveal the Soviet hand.

Edited by EnigmaticWorld
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  • 2 weeks later...

BBC journalists can freely say these things unchallenged.

 

Why do we seem to see so much flooding these days?

Quote

Why is it events that we referred to as "once in a generation" seem to now happen every winter? Well it all comes down to climate change.

from: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-67863282?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ns_campaign=bbc_live&ns_linkname=659549fab255e96a9e4bbe5f%26Why do we seem to see so much flooding these days%3F%262024-01-04T07%3A38%3A13.030Z&ns_fee=0&pinned_post_locator=urn:asset:494b61ee-f029-4ee4-bfc2-4adc8c1656db&pinned_post_asset_id=659549fab255e96a9e4bbe5f&pinned_post_type=share

 

Quote

I have been Environment Correspondent for the BBC in the Midlands for more than 25 years now, which means I can look at flood stories not just as one-off events but in terms of the story they tell.

Take Leominster in Herefordshire, which sits where the River Lugg and its tributary the River Kenwater meet.

We have records of levels of the River Lugg going back to 1970 but if we look at floods of more than 2.6m (9ft), most happened post-2000 and, of those, six happened in the last three years.

Actually thanks to the current spate of flooding, make that seven.

 

Well of course, nothing to do with the fact that the Environment Agency hasn't done much dredging of rivers in the last couple of decades.

 

More rainwater, less river volume to carry the water, it doesn't need a genius to work out what happens next!

 

The same 'environment correspondent' adds the following:

 

Would dredging rivers make any difference?

Quote

Spend time along any river reporting about flooding, and sooner or later someone will mention dredging.

The idea is that a large boat floats along, scooping up mud from the bottom of the river and taking it away.

People then imagine the river could carry more water, move quicker and so less flooding.

We did once do a lot of dredging on rivers like the Severn to let boats with deep keels get much further up the river than they do today.

And it's true that for smaller channels and tributaries, removing blockages and even dredging is a vital part of keeping the water flowing.

But to make any difference to a fast-flowing river like the Severn, you would have to remove an extraordinary amount of material from the bottom of the river.

It would be an ecological disaster and the very best you could hope for would be to help upstream communities while it sent even more water downstream, overwhelming the people living there.

Worse, a faster-flowing river might start to erode the banks and pose real danger to properties close to the edge.

Just outside Gloucester docks, I once found the half-submerged remains of the last proper dredging boat on the Severn.

For now that's where it's staying.

from: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-67863282?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ns_campaign=bbc_live&ns_linkname=6596ed49f825603c1a381a3b%26Would dredging rivers make any difference%3F%262024-01-05T09%3A10%3A34.157Z&ns_fee=0&pinned_post_locator=urn:asset:59154069-d85e-4b72-adc6-70cfa0d77d46&pinned_post_asset_id=6596ed49f825603c1a381a3b&pinned_post_type=share

 

It's almost like he's 'justifying' the lack of dredging that is done nowadays, as if there is 'no point' to it.

 

Another factor that's never taken into consideration, maybe it seems that more people are being affected by flooding rivers because in the last couple of decades more homes have been built on what were traditionally 'floodplains'?

 

That BBC 'live feed' is full of homeowners complaining about having to spend money on 'flood-proofing' their homes.

 

What did they expect? The developers clearly don't take these things into consideration, and it remains a mystery to those people who buy homes located next to major rivers.

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22 hours ago, Grumpy Owl said:

BBC journalists can freely say these things unchallenged.

 

Why do we seem to see so much flooding these days?

from: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-67863282?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ns_campaign=bbc_live&ns_linkname=659549fab255e96a9e4bbe5f%26Why do we seem to see so much flooding these days%3F%262024-01-04T07%3A38%3A13.030Z&ns_fee=0&pinned_post_locator=urn:asset:494b61ee-f029-4ee4-bfc2-4adc8c1656db&pinned_post_asset_id=659549fab255e96a9e4bbe5f&pinned_post_type=share

 

 

Well of course, nothing to do with the fact that the Environment Agency hasn't done much dredging of rivers in the last couple of decades.

 

More rainwater, less river volume to carry the water, it doesn't need a genius to work out what happens next!

 

The same 'environment correspondent' adds the following:

 

Would dredging rivers make any difference?

from: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-67863282?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ns_campaign=bbc_live&ns_linkname=6596ed49f825603c1a381a3b%26Would dredging rivers make any difference%3F%262024-01-05T09%3A10%3A34.157Z&ns_fee=0&pinned_post_locator=urn:asset:59154069-d85e-4b72-adc6-70cfa0d77d46&pinned_post_asset_id=6596ed49f825603c1a381a3b&pinned_post_type=share

 

It's almost like he's 'justifying' the lack of dredging that is done nowadays, as if there is 'no point' to it.

 

Another factor that's never taken into consideration, maybe it seems that more people are being affected by flooding rivers because in the last couple of decades more homes have been built on what were traditionally 'floodplains'?

 

That BBC 'live feed' is full of homeowners complaining about having to spend money on 'flood-proofing' their homes.

 

What did they expect? The developers clearly don't take these things into consideration, and it remains a mystery to those people who buy homes located next to major rivers.

The Severn has flooded regularly during my lifetime - I went to school at various places along it. Nothing new there. But farmers and other landowners no longer dredge or maintain ditches and drains, so there is flooding where there used not to be. So what caused the serious floods in that area in 1947??? And the ones we used to go and gawp at the in 60s?

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8 minutes ago, k_j_evans said:

The Severn has flooded regularly during my lifetime - I went to school at various places along it. Nothing new there. But farmers and other landowners no longer dredge or maintain ditches and drains, so there is flooding where there used not to be. So what caused the serious floods in that area in 1947??? And the ones we used to go and gawp at the in 60s?

 

That BBC feed also includes a photo someone sent in showing flooding on New Road in Worcester... from 1886.

 

 

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/live-experience/cps/624/cpsprodpb/vivo/live/images/2024/1/5/68d34262-f3f1-4705-b9f5-5091a351f5d4.jpg

 

 

The point is that these rivers are flooding more often in recent years because of lack of dredging and maintenance (plus more surface water running into them as everything gets paved over), but the media are trying to make out this is a 'new phenomenon' that they can blame on 'climate change'.

 

 

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Another carbon tax / levy (sorry it's a "border adjustment mechanism") to come in a few years' time and make sure other countries can't undercut our taxes and create "carbon leakage". Don't you just love this new environmental jargon. It will apply to certain imports initially but no doubt get expanded afterwards. 

 

"A carbon pricing mechanism for imports will be implemented by 2027 to support decarbonisation.

 

From 2027, goods imported into the UK from countries with a lower carbon price than the UK will have to pay a levy. This levy, known as a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM), will initially apply to imports of iron, steel, aluminium, fertiliser, hydrogen, ceramics, glass and cement. 

The CBAM will ensure that products from overseas are subject to a comparable carbon price to those produced in the UK. This will reduce the risk of carbon leakage in the affected sectors. Carbon leakage is defined as the movement of production and associated emissions from one country to another due to different levels of decarbonisation effort through carbon pricing and climate regulation. 

The charge applied by the CBAM will depend on the amount of carbon emitted in the production of the imported goods. This will be adjusted if any carbon price has already been applied in the country of origin. For example, imports from the EU will have been subject to carbon pricing through the EU emissions trading system. " 

 

 

https://www.icaew.com/insights/tax-news/2023/dec-2023/uk-announces-introduction-of-carbon-border-adjustment-mechanism 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-uk-levy-to-level-carbon-pricing  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Does anyone know what happened to the biodiesel industry which was a big deal about 20 years ago? If we make diesel out of vegetable oil, including recycled oil, it would be net zero wouldn't it? So it should be feted by the green lobby but they insist on electric instead. 

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5 hours ago, Campion said:

Does anyone know what happened to the biodiesel industry which was a big deal about 20 years ago? If we make diesel out of vegetable oil, including recycled oil, it would be net zero wouldn't it? So it should be feted by the green lobby but they insist on electric instead. 


There are companies that collect used oil from cafes and restaurants. 

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Richard Branson has started another globally oriented project, PLANETARY GUARDIANS, to regulate the health of the planet. One of his 'planetary guardians' is the globalist and ex-Irish President, MARY ROBINSON. 

 

Branson wrote on his website of a key collaboration in the project:

 

"First developed in 2009 by a global team of 28 of the world’s leading scientists led by Professor Johan Rockström of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, the planetary boundaries framework identifies nine critical systems needed to regulate the health of the entire planet. From climate change to freshwater use, biodiversity loss to chemical pollution and the release of novel entities, these boundaries define what Rockström calls the “safe operating space” for humanity. Veer too far beyond these limits and you risk causing irreversible damage to the very ecosystems that sustain life."

 

"The Guardians will call on the U.N. Security Council, the G7 and G20, multilaterals, and governments to use the planetary boundaries framework as a measurement and risk framework for global coordination, including accountability to existing agreements such as the High Seas Treaty, the Paris Agreement, and the Global Biodiversity Agreement."

 

https://www.virgin.com/branson-family/richard-branson-blog/how-the-planetary-guardians-can-help-secure-earths-future

Edited by Grumpy Grapes
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1 hour ago, SimonTV said:

 

There is two of them now? Those are massive, what causes them do we know that?

 

It could be linked to a solar maximum, or maybe it's dark, malevolent forces using the sun to damage the Earth. Who can say. 

October 25, 2023 – NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) issued a revised prediction for solar activity during Solar Cycle 25 that concludes solar activity will increase more quickly and peak at a higher level than that predicted by an expert panel in December 2019. The updated prediction now calls for Solar Cycle 25 to peak between January and October of 2024, with a maximum sunspot number between 137 and 173.

 

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On 7/10/2021 at 7:48 AM, SimonTV said:

With Climate Change being the next big scam, starting to see a lot of low content posts about it. Thought I could make a thread and have it as an ongoing low content thread related to climate change, with memes and videos and so on. 

 

I'll start with this one, guys works out that he is getting 5 mpg from his electric car because they use a diesel generator to generate electricity for the charging station. 

 

 


It is funny how the UN and world economic forum are so worked up over climate change and carbon output in the air but when comes to land filed it is okay, same with every liberal university. Thanks Microsoft you get a gold medal.

 


Researchers warn that Windows 11 restrictions could send 240 million computers to landfills

Technology research firm Canalys reports that when Microsoft sunsets Windows 10 in 2025, it could send as many as 240 million PCs to the scrap heap. Reuters estimates the dump would equate to 480 million kilograms of e-waste. For perspective, it adds that such a dump is equivalent to about 320,000 automobiles.

 

https://www.techspot.com/news/101313-researchers-warn-windows-11-restrictions-could-send-240.html

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On 1/9/2024 at 6:33 AM, Campion said:

Another carbon tax / levy (sorry it's a "border adjustment mechanism") to come in a few years' time and make sure other countries can't undercut our taxes and create "carbon leakage". Don't you just love this new environmental jargon. It will apply to certain imports initially but no doubt get expanded afterwards. 

 

"A carbon pricing mechanism for imports will be implemented by 2027 to support decarbonisation.

 

From 2027, goods imported into the UK from countries with a lower carbon price than the UK will have to pay a levy. This levy, known as a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM), will initially apply to imports of iron, steel, aluminium, fertiliser, hydrogen, ceramics, glass and cement. 

The CBAM will ensure that products from overseas are subject to a comparable carbon price to those produced in the UK. This will reduce the risk of carbon leakage in the affected sectors. Carbon leakage is defined as the movement of production and associated emissions from one country to another due to different levels of decarbonisation effort through carbon pricing and climate regulation. 

The charge applied by the CBAM will depend on the amount of carbon emitted in the production of the imported goods. This will be adjusted if any carbon price has already been applied in the country of origin. For example, imports from the EU will have been subject to carbon pricing through the EU emissions trading system. " 

 

 

https://www.icaew.com/insights/tax-news/2023/dec-2023/uk-announces-introduction-of-carbon-border-adjustment-mechanism 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-uk-levy-to-level-carbon-pricing  


Welcome to stakeholder capitalism. This will later lead to countries that don’t subscribe to climate change or do enough to fight it will have to pay lots tax to import the product to other countries. Who is going to pay the tax the people not the government or business but the people buying the goods,

 

I can see roll out of carbon tax for importing and exporting of such products.

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Piers Corbyn claims he predicted earthquakes:

 

"27 Jan 2024 major earth facing coronal holes in our WeatherAction.com forecasted R5 (Red5) period 25-27 Jan

 

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/browse/significant.php?year=2024


"There was also a significant earthquake m=6.1 in Guatemala on 27th confirming our warning of increased major earthquake risk in this R5 period." 

 

"BRILLIANT! There was a very significant  M6.5 earthquake on morning of Jan 28th (ie within half a day if the R5 forecasted 25-27th for extra risk), in Brazil. Note M6.5 is  significant success in 25-27 +-0.5d ie 4d period where expected score is 4x5/28=0.7 and score was 1.0 M6.5+ quakes."

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/browse/significant.php?year=2024

 

Edited by Grumpy Grapes
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