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Why is the conspiracy movement so pro-Islam?


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On 5/27/2021 at 1:42 PM, Macnamara said:

 

White progressives do whatever the latest political correctness dictats tell them to do

And they do this because they've been indoctrinated since childhood by the acolytes of the Frankfurt School, who have wormed their way in to every institution in the former Christendom.

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On 5/17/2021 at 11:27 PM, DarianF said:

 

Maybe because the Muslims are one of the few groups left who would actually have the balls to take up arms against the new world order. Meanwhile, we cower like scared sheep because soy boy cunts like Matt Hancock make a decree on this mask, or that vaccine, or whatever.

I agree that Islam carries a spiritual sword, and gives the option of resistance, but it seems that the only known Muslim scholar /leader, who isn't totally subservient to the plandemic agenda is Imran Hussein. Muslims are often very vocal about zionism real estate issues, but don't delve very deeply into who the real criminals are in the world beyond naming some puppet politicians for instance. As a Muslim conspiracy theorist I am very disappointed in most so - called Muslims tbh. 

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2 hours ago, Weedo said:

I agree that Islam carries a spiritual sword, and gives the option of resistance, but it seems that the only known Muslim scholar /leader, who isn't totally subservient to the plandemic agenda is Imran Hussein. Muslims are often very vocal about zionism real estate issues, but don't delve very deeply into who the real criminals are in the world beyond naming some puppet politicians for instance. As a Muslim conspiracy theorist I am very disappointed in most so - called Muslims tbh. 

 

The other thing I would add is the 'conspiracy' movement isn't 'pro-Islam', but rather there's a kind of sympathy there in certain respects. For example, if you believe 9/11 was an inside job, then obviously you don't believe a bunch of Islamic terrorists were responsible. Also add 7/7 and other false flag attacks to that list. And then think about all the negative shit the muslims had to deal with since 9/11. If you believe they had nothing to do with the attack, then why would you hate them for it? It's not logical. Of course this is separate from an independent critique of Islam itself- which is a totally separate issue.

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1 minute ago, DarianF said:

 

The other thing I would add is the 'conspiracy' movement isn't 'pro-Islam', but rather there's a kind of sympathy there in certain respects. For example, if you believe 9/11 was an inside job, then obviously you don't believe a bunch of Islamic terrorists were responsible. Also add 7/7 and other false flag attacks to that list. And then think about all the negative shit the muslims had to deal with since 9/11. If you believe they had nothing to do with the attack, then why would you hate them for it? It's not logical. Of course this is separate from an independent critique of Islam itself- which is a totally separate issue.

Yes I get your point. It's basically that people feel guilty for having been fooled and brainwashed to hate poor Muslims by the biggest conspiracies of the last century, so that makes them somehow feel extra compassion for them. Or? There are a few issues where mainstream Islam overlaps with conspiracy theorists, but i would say it is on a shallow level, where most Muslims point fingers at Jews, instead of understanding that the true enemy are satanic. They do this mistake even though it is clearly written in their books who the enemy are. So in this sense they are part of the conspiracy, and just a pawn in the game, that fits quite well with that model of 3 world wars by Albert Pike. Whether he really said it or not is beside the point. It is in no one's benefit - other than the top conspirators - to have conflict between Muslims, Jews or Christians. Some forces are trying to keep monotheistic religious groups divided, and others are trying to unite them. The ones uniting are quite few these days. So most groups and sects of all religions are accumulating negative karma, which gives red carpets for the satanics to Walz into their horrible world order - that will surely fail soon God Willing. 

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Within higher places of learning in the U.S., indoctrinated students are generally woke and thus in keeping with political correctness (a creation of the far left) tend to be sympathetic to violent Islamist groups such as ISIS and Hamas. Some free-thinking pundits have suggested this is due to the infiltration of Islamist (i.e. Jew-hating) propaganda and influence within Western academia, which is primarily "progressive" as opposed to conservative. If so, the so-called tolerant left is being unknowingly used by an insidious ideology that is political at its core and fundamentally intolerant. One commentator has expressed his belief that when the Islamists rise to prominence in the U.K., which he predicts won't be too far off, the censorious leftists will be utterly surprised to get a taste of their own medicine; meaning, that they will be immediately deleted, and ultimately subjugated under sharia law. No doubt when this happens they will blame ultra-Zionists for the takeover, or claim that all the imams and mullahs in their midst, the ones spewing virulent hatred of Jews (not only Israelis), as being "crypto" Jews.

 

With all due respect to Mr. Icke, whose work I greatly admire, if one were to do a word count of how many times the word Zionist appears in The Answer compared to Islam, one would begin to understand the reason for the almost pathological anti-Zionist-speak that goes on among the arguably more impressionable parrots of Ickeism. (Note: I consider myself an Ickette as well; just not, shall we say, an ultra one. I can disagree on some things! Imagine, just holding a contrary view as this gets you labeled by some as one working on behalf of Hasbara!)

 

This is not to say that I don't believe the expansionist Islamists are being used themselves as part of an agenda orchestrated by -- I prefer to use the term global elites rather than Zionists -- but are Zionists also responsible for the way some if not many Muslim women are treated and viewed within Islamic societies?, for the persecution of Christians and minorities in many Muslim countries?, for the enforced genital mutilation of many Muslim women?, for the contempt for homosexuals in lands under sharia?, for so-called "honor killings"? 

 

The alternative media is for the most part a refreshing respite from leftist influence/rhetoric except it seems when it comes to this, in keeping with a damn good conspiracy theory.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/25/2021 at 5:25 AM, DarianF said:

 

The other thing I would add is the 'conspiracy' movement isn't 'pro-Islam', but rather there's a kind of sympathy there in certain respects. For example, if you believe 9/11 was an inside job, then obviously you don't believe a bunch of Islamic terrorists were responsible. Also add 7/7 and other false flag attacks to that list. And then think about all the negative shit the muslims had to deal with since 9/11. If you believe they had nothing to do with the attack, then why would you hate them for it? It's not logical. Of course this is separate from an independent critique of Islam itself- which is a totally separate issue.

 

The Oden Yinon plans describes the Zionist aspiration for the land that Theodor Herzl wrote about: "From the Brook of Egypt to the Euphrates." This is the same land that is described in Genesis 15 as the inheritance of the descendants of Abraham. Semitic Muslims often identify as descendants of Ishmael son of Abraham, which would make them an obstacle for the Zionist agenda for "Greater Israel".

 

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  • 1 month later...

Pro-Islamic leanings from non-Muslims, and anti-Zionist sentiments by non-Muslims, are virtually omnipresent these days; they are found on student campuses across North America, within the so-called progressive movement and LGBTQ community, and it is only natural that at least some of these apologists/critics would find their way and filter down into this movement as well.

 

This demonstrates the extent to which this sacred cow has disseminated its droppings.

 

When the alternative/independent media likewise remains largely silent as to this sacred cow, that's when you know we're no longer in Kansas.

 

I have also found this rather odd, if not a little alarming. Programs and shows which presumably have the freedom to discuss something that within the MSM is considered un-PC and practically taboo, curiously and seldom venture into this territory, despite claims of being edgy or in pursuit of truth.

 

This may at times have something to do with shows that are aired on the radio, in which political correctness is monitored and policed by various commissions. The hosts of these shows may themselves wish to focus upon a particular cow patty every now and then but more often than not decide against it, perhaps feeling it's not worth it to make waves which could potentially jeopardize their show's very existence, which serves a useful purpose in so many other ways, via the discussing of other important yet less sensitive subject matter. But there also seems to be a lot of self-censorship among podcasters, which I find quite telling, also.

 

There are some exceptions to this, of course. Although not among the conspiracy theory subculture, Ezra Levant, as an independent news commentator, is one who doesn't seem to be intimidated when it comes to being critical of sacred cows, which the country's state broadcaster and legacy media either won't touch or cleverly 'spin' from a sanitized leftist slant. He is to be admired for this, but you're right, even outside of the corporate-owned media, there is for the most part eerie silence if not covert, in-the-background submission at work.

 

For this, freedom-lovers might all be doomed.

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