Jump to content

My Sister Got The Jab: Mormon Church Endorses mRNA Vaccines


Scogan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Upon sending my sister a laundry list of reasons why I am not getting the jab, she replied she already did.  That opened up a brief dialogue.  She is religious and sent me a PODCAST of a religious podcaster interviewing a mormon doctor, telling me that this podcast convinced her the shot was safe.  So I played the podcast and here is the recap (PODCAST link is pasted below);

 

The host opened by stating the Church has endorsed the vaccine, that it was a duty to be "good global citizens."  The vaccine is the only way forward. Individuals should seek out qualified doctors if they have questions about efficacy or safety of the vaccine. 

 

The doctor being interviewed has a degree in Epidemiology and works in emergency medicine, with limited research into COVID-19.  Both host and Doctor characterize COVID vaccines as a Miracle.  The doctor praised how fast these vaccines were developed based upon 20 years of research plagued by serious problems.  

 

She gives a misleading explanation of how mRNA vaccines work; "The vaccine inserts mRNA into your shoulder and your cells pick up the mRNA and make Spike proteins that your body can develop an immune response.  There is no virus in this vaccine..."   (Failing to mention that your cells are being fooled into making VIRUS Spike proteins.  So while the vaccine itself isn't a spike protein, it has the instructions for making a VIRUS part) 

 

And the doctor goes on to say just TRUST the Primary Source and get the jab.

 

So I listened and gave my sister my analysis, to which she wrote:  Isn’t this a crazy but wonderful world!! Can hardly keep up. So much swaying from side to side. Its enough to make a person grumpy and hermit-like or postal. Or determined to stand up for the little good there is out there and it’s actually all around. That’s where I try to stay. If I’m not careful I become the bitter one. Then I have to stop it and get out and go serve others. That helps!

 

OK, I really couldn't make sense of that.  But I do respect her choice.  Life is all about free will.  What saddens me though is the church endorsement convinced her to get the shot. The PODCAST is pasted below,

 

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in/id1439975046?i=1000505915536

Edited by Scogan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Sorry she took the jab.

 

I'm also all for free choice but this choice is not an informed one, when you’re being lied to it’s not free choice but a brainwashed ‘choice’ and that’s what bothers me.

 

As for that church… they should be called MORONS 😵💫

Edited by ItsTheTruthThough
  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, ItsTheTruthThough said:

 

 

As for that church… they should be called MORONS 😵💫

Haha.  I've been calling them that for years (just haven't told her though)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, ItsTheTruthThough said:

Sorry she took the jab.

 

I'm also all for free choice but this choice is not an informed one, when you’re being lied to it’s not free choice but a brainwashed ‘choice’ and that’s what bothers me.

 

As for that church… they should be called MORONS 😵💫

Exactly. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

mormonism is a freemasonic offshoot

Mormonism and Freemasonry

The relationship between Mormonism and Freemasonry began early in the life of Joseph Smith, founder of the Latter Day Saint movement, as his older brother Hyrum and possibly his father were Freemasons while the family lived near Palmyra, New York. In the late 1820s, the western New York region was swept with anti-Masonic fervor.

Nevertheless, by the 1840s, Smith and several prominent Latter Day Saints had become Freemasons and founded a lodge in Nauvoo, Illinois, in March 1842. Soon after joining Freemasonry, Smith introduced a temple endowment ceremony including a number of symbolic elements that were very similar to those in Freemasonry. Smith remained a Freemason until his death; however, later leaders in the movement have distanced themselves from Freemasonry. In modern times, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), holds no position for or against the compatibility of Masonry with LDS Church doctrine.

A significant number of leaders in the early Latter Day Saint movement were Masons prior to their involvement in the movement. Notable examples include Heber C. Kimball, John C. Bennett, Hyrum Smith and Joseph Smith, Sr.

In the early 1840s, a Masonic Lodge was formed by Latter Day Saints who were Freemasons. Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum became members of the newly-formed Nauvoo lodge. It appears that John C. Bennett had a particularly strong influence in the spread of Freemasonry among the Mormons, and soon over 1,500 Mormon men in the city of Nauvoo were practicing Masons.[citation needed]

"By 1840, John Cook Bennett, a former active leader in Masonry had arrived in Commerce and rapidly exerted his persuasive leadership in all facets of the Church, including Mormon Masonry. ... Joseph and Sidney [Rigdon] were inducted into formal Masonry ... on the same day ..." being made "Masons on Sight" by the Illinois Grandmaster.("Is There No Help for the Widow's Son?" by Dr. Reed C. Durham, Jr., as printed in "Joseph Smith and Masonry: No Help for the Widow's Son", Martin Pub. Co., Nauvoo, Ill., 1980, p. 17.) (This freed Joseph from having to complete the ritual and memorization necessary to work one's way through the first three degrees.) Making one "A Mason on Sight" is generally reserved as an honor and is a rarity in occurrence.

— Reed Durham

In 1842 Smith became a Master Mason, inducted by Abraham Jonas.[1]

Tuesday, [March] 15. — I officiated as grand chaplain at the installation of the Nauvoo Lodge of Free Masons, at the Grove near the Temple. Grand Master Jonas, of Columbus, being present, a large number of people assembled on the occasion. The day was exceedingly fine; all things were done in order, and universal satisfaction was manifested. In the evening I received the first degree in Freemasonry in the Nauvoo Lodge, assembled in my general business office.

— Joseph Smith, History of the Church, Vol.4, Ch.32, p.550–1.

Smith was raised to the third degree of master mason "on sight" by Grand Master Jonas of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. This was within Jonas' right of office, but a fairly rare procedure.[2]

Wednesday, March 16. — I was with the Masonic Lodge and rose to the sublime degree.

— Joseph Smith, History of the Church, Vol. 4, Ch.32, p. 552

[The Joseph Smith family] was a Masonic family which lived by and practiced the estimable and admirable tenets of Freemasonry. The father, Joseph Smith, Sr., was a documented member in upstate New York. He was raised to the degree of Master Mason on May 7, 1818 in Ontario Lodge No. 23 of Canandaigua, New York. An older son, Hyrum Smith, was a member of Mount Moriah Lodge No. 112, Palmyra New York.

— Terry Chateau, Freemasonry and the Church of Latter-Day Saints[3][better source needed]

Hyrum Smith was not only Joseph's older brother, but succeeded their father as Presiding Patriarch and Oliver Cowdery as Assistant President of the Church.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mormonism_and_Freemasonry

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...