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They have a one objective: total control of food

Total control of food means literally total control of anthing to do with production, purchase, shipping, selling, consumption of it.

Allowing restaurants to open up for a while then closing them down, open close, open close speeds up bankrupting the small independant food distributors.

If you have control of all things food

You control the people

Make them do anything they want

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Their objective is clear (at least, to me)....only 2 food distributing centres will remain

Big supermarkets

Foodbanks

 

All restaurants, after some time, in stages close permanently

Same for takeaways, hotdog stands, streetfood stalls, bakeries.....the works.

 

Cooked food delivery-only will remain open for a while and then

suddenly all will be forced to close

 

The smaller independant food distributors (dry/canned/processed)will be forced out of buisness. They will increase licence fees/rent/property taxes. Also they cant compete with supermarket low price products

 

As all this is going on the small farmers are being hit......but thats another story

 

 

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Foodbanks, foodbanks.

More and more people unemployed and......their savings all used up, creditcards maxed out have no alternative

Every country will have the same problem

People will be forced to wait longer and longer

The queues 5 miles+

The boxes will be smaller....hey, every week they seem to be smaller

 

One of these days foodbanks will close

 

Only the big supermarkets left open

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On 1/21/2021 at 5:16 AM, Jikwan said:

They have a one objective: total control of food

Total control of food means literally total control of anthing to do with production, purchase, shipping, selling, consumption of it.

Allowing restaurants to open up for a while then closing them down, open close, open close speeds up bankrupting the small independant food distributors.

If you have control of all things food

You control the people

Make them do anything they want

 

As I see it, the only restaurants/cafes that are closed are those that don't offer any takeaway or delivery service.

 

In Sparkbrook, Birmingham where I work, there are a proliferation of cafes and takeaway establishments, and they're all still open, though they've removed any indoor seating they had available.

 

The smart business owners are all utilising services such as Deliveroo, Uber Eats, Just Eat, as well as others, that allow people to order food via apps or websites and either go and collect it or have it delivered to them. Think about it, Chinese takeways and pizza parlours have been doing this for years quite successfully.

 

At work, one of our sectors is catering and hospitality. Sometime in 2018, before all this pandemic nonsense surfaced, we were talking with our sales rep from the catering wholesaler we dealt with, he told us about the 'coming rise' of the concept of 'dark kitchens'. These are basically establishments set up in small industrial units specifically for catering for delivery services, hence the name 'dark kitchen', as there is no retail counter or dining area required, as it offers online-ordering and delivery only.

 

The takeaway meal market is already big business, and if people are going to continue to be forced to 'eat at home' rather than 'dining out', it is companies like Deliveroo et al who are taking full advantage of the situation.

 

Personally, I rarely have takeaway meals, and only ever go out for a meal if I'm with family or friends. Most takeaway stuff is junk and overpriced anyway, why should I wait nearly an hour for a pizza to be delivered to me, when I can just bung a frozen one in my oven for 20mins? (For a quarter of the price too!)

 

I may not be the most skilled cook in the world, but even I can cobble together some satisfying meals using chilled and frozen foods at home.

 

But it seems that people are losing the ability to even do this. I think there'll be a time when even the supermarkets become redundant, because most people will be unable to prepare meals themselves at home, and will become reliant on takeaway delivery meals delivered to their doorstep.

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4 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

 

As I see it, the only restaurants/cafes that are closed are those that don't offer any takeaway or delivery service.

 

In Sparkbrook, Birmingham where I work, there are a proliferation of cafes and takeaway establishments, and they're all still open, though they've removed any indoor seating they had available.

 

The smart business owners are all utilising services such as Deliveroo, Uber Eats, Just Eat, as well as others, that allow people to order food via apps or websites and either go and collect it or have it delivered to them. Think about it, Chinese takeways and pizza parlours have been doing this for years quite successfully.

 

At work, one of our sectors is catering and hospitality. Sometime in 2018, before all this pandemic nonsense surfaced, we were talking with our sales rep from the catering wholesaler we dealt with, he told us about the 'coming rise' of the concept of 'dark kitchens'. These are basically establishments set up in small industrial units specifically for catering for delivery services, hence the name 'dark kitchen', as there is no retail counter or dining area required, as it offers online-ordering and delivery only.

 

The takeaway meal market is already big business, and if people are going to continue to be forced to 'eat at home' rather than 'dining out', it is companies like Deliveroo et al who are taking full advantage of the situation.

 

Personally, I rarely have takeaway meals, and only ever go out for a meal if I'm with family or friends. Most takeaway stuff is junk and overpriced anyway, why should I wait nearly an hour for a pizza to be delivered to me, when I can just bung a frozen one in my oven for 20mins? (For a quarter of the price too!)

 

I may not be the most skilled cook in the world, but even I can cobble together some satisfying meals using chilled and frozen foods at home.

 

But it seems that people are losing the ability to even do this. I think there'll be a time when even the supermarkets become redundant, because most people will be unable to prepare meals themselves at home, and will become reliant on takeaway delivery meals delivered to their doorstep.

I totally agree with it: takeaways doing a roaring trade, loads of cafes still open and people are forced to cook their own food

 

Im trying to point out in as logical way possible the direction all these big and small establisments are moving towards

We all know the great mafia understands control the food....you control the people...the masses.

Theyve already made huge steps reducing food availibility eg closing all open markets ( i saw this personally in thailand) and not for a short time...many weeks.

Markets may be reopened now, the closing of them is a warm-up only

 

The ultimate control of food as i see it is you can only buy it from military operated giant supermarkets. Pay by digital currency only

If the mafia dont like you your bank account is frozen

 

But people will trade for their food with small farmers! you say

 

There are ways to kill off the small farmers. Many ways

One example might be     all produce has to be irradiated to certain specifications. Why? Because covid can be transmitted via produce

Oh yes, they can prove this

The farmers have to buy their own hi tech purification machines

Very expensive

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1 minute ago, Jikwan said:

One example might be     all produce has to be irradiated to certain specifications. Why? Because covid can be transmitted via produce

Oh yes, they can prove this

 

We've already seen one example of this, wasn't it some ice-cream that 'tested positive' for Covid?

 

And rather than people sitting up and saying "hang on a minute that's absurd!", people are going crazy instead.

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2 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

 

We've already seen one example of this, wasn't it some ice-cream that 'tested positive' for Covid?

 

And rather than people sitting up and saying "hang on a minute that's absurd!", people are going crazy instead.

Some good percentage of the masses might react to this stupid claim that veggies can infect

The govts dont care...they institute it and thats that. You cant argue with the government.

Same as fluride in the water...govts kept that going many dacades despite protests...heavy protests

All they need is just one reason to close ANYTHING down

As long as the reason kind of makes sense.....they will institute it

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How much more stupid can you get it? They force tens of millions, billions of people do drink (proven) poisinous fluride because it might help childrens teeth!

Evidence they used on testing these children was almost certainly fake

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Here's what you may read on the 'Deliveroo' wiki page...

 

Quote

Its subsidiary operation, Deliveroo Editions, focuses on growing a network of ghost kitchens—kitchens located off-site from restaurants for the preparation of delivery-only meals

 

'off-site' from restaurants that are now closed because of COvID restrictions, until all what will be left are huge central kitchens in industrial areas from where 'food' will be delivered to private homes and a new kind of 'restaurants' with no more kitchen or cook...

 

 

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6 minutes ago, chud said:

Here's what you may read on the 'Deliveroo' wiki page...

 

 

'off-site' from restaurants that are now closed because of COvID restrictions, until all what will be left are huge central kitchens in industrial areas from where 'food' will be delivered to private homes and a new kind of 'restaurants' with no more kitchen or cook...

 

 

Sounds like its what they would do...get rid of/minimize small buisnesses leaving only giant companies/corporations left. Easy to control

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13 hours ago, chud said:

Here's what you may read on the 'Deliveroo' wiki page...

 

 

'off-site' from restaurants that are now closed because of COvID restrictions, until all what will be left are huge central kitchens in industrial areas from where 'food' will be delivered to private homes and a new kind of 'restaurants' with no more kitchen or cook...

 

 

 

And like I said, this isn't a new concept introduced because of Covid, this started a couple of years ago.

 

Think about it, the existing restaurant properties could all be closed down and sold off (and no doubt redeveloped into apartments/flats), why have a huge building with lots of table dining area which is basically redundant now?

 

Now I understand why there are so many empty industrial units in inner-city areas that somehow avoided 'redevelopment', the owners will soon have a ready supply of new tenants, setting up kitchens and food preparation areas.

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4 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

 

And like I said, this isn't a new concept introduced because of Covid, this started a couple of years ago.

 

Think about it, the existing restaurant properties could all be closed down and sold off (and no doubt redeveloped into apartments/flats), why have a huge building with lots of table dining area which is basically redundant now?

 

Now I understand why there are so many empty industrial units in inner-city areas that somehow avoided 'redevelopment', the owners will soon have a ready supply of new tenants, setting up kitchens and food preparation areas.

Youre saying they want to make obsolete cooking at home.

Interesting. Makes sense too

So increasingly we should expect supermarkrts phasing out raw produce and increasing ready made just need a warmup foods

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Maybe connected to real estate too since it's the sting of the millenium, but maybe the aim is to actually dissuade or ban people from cooking at all...

I'm aware that Mr Gordon Ramsey is a showman, but whether or not his 'victims' were real protagonists paid to overact, most of them would have a first defense reaction perfectly matching what you're told by a bad restaurateur in the real life : my customers never complain… so let's talk about the public's taste in food as whether in that field or any other one, things most often aren't quite imposed on people but most of the time they willingly consent, agree to or welcome the 'change'…

Back in the past century you could randomly pick a restaurant in town and go have a good meal instead of stepping back out hungry or sick from 8 on 10 of them, so there's been way too much abuse in that field where anyone with no skill or the least education in cooking would start or take over a business…

As I already said I think it's no longer a matter of education but of physical constitution, people having purposely been made lose their sense of taste through the consumption of medications, processed food, home 'perfumes' or cleaning products to such a point that they got unable to even feel the difference between what's sweet or what's salty (aspartame!), so in that field like in the all rest people sealed their own fate by complying and contributing to the lowering of standards and taste corruption ultimately wished by big companies for better productivity…

 

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3 hours ago, chud said:

 

Maybe connected to real estate too since it's the sting of the millenium, but maybe the aim is to actually dissuade or ban people from cooking at all...

I'm aware that Mr Gordon Ramsey is a showman, but whether or not his 'victims' were real protagonists paid to overact, most of them would have a first defense reaction perfectly matching what you're told by a bad restaurateur in the real life : my customers never complain… so let's talk about the public's taste in food as whether in that field or any other one, things most often aren't quite imposed on people but most of the time they willingly consent, agree to or welcome the 'change'…

 

Back in the past century you could randomly pick a restaurant in town and go have a good meal instead of stepping back out hungry or sick from 8 on 10 of them, so there's been way too much abuse in that field where anyone with no skill or the least education in cooking would start or take over a business…

 

As I already said I think it's no longer a matter of education but of physical constitution, people having purposely been made lose their sense of taste through the consumption of medications, processed food, home 'perfumes' or cleaning products to such a point that they got unable to even feel the difference between what's sweet or what's salty (aspartame!), so in that field like in the all rest people sealed their own fate by complying and contributing to the lowering of standards and taste corruption ultimately wished by big companies for better productivity…

 

Its not difficult to corrupt the diet of entire countries. 

Initially you can startup restaurants selling very tasty low quality, harmful food very cheap. Be susidized by govt

Fill newspapers with recepies for said dishes. Videos too

School meals will serve those dangerous meals

 

You so right about the tongue being corrupted by powerful tastes. It cannot appreciate fine subtle tastes anymore...too plain

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8 hours ago, Jikwan said:

Youre saying they want to make obsolete cooking at home.

Interesting. Makes sense too

So increasingly we should expect supermarkrts phasing out raw produce and increasing ready made just need a warmup foods

 

Going back to your original post, "total control of food".

 

This is one way of doing so, by somehow 'encouraging' people to not even bother preparing meals at home, but become reliant on meal deliveries.

 

Prior to the lockdowns, you only have to look around and see this falling into place already.

 

Convenience stores and petrol stations selling pre-packed sandwiches, wraps and pasta pots. Grabbing 'lunch' from a local takeaway, or from a fast-food giant such as McDonalds or Burger King.

 

"Food on the go" - people either eat in their cars, or at their desks at work. Or in the evening, grab a KFC family meal deal, pizza or Chinese take-out and munch away on the sofa in front of the TV.

 

A lot of people just simply either "can't be bothered to cook" or they "don't have the time".

 

"It's far more convenient to just order a takeaway."

 

So yes, I can foresee at time where cooking at home becomes obsolete, and then there is no need for massive supermarkets with loads of fresh produce in stock, which if not purchased before the 'best before date' simply ends up being thrown away.

 

Oh yeah, and expect that to become a 'thing' at some point in the near future, the amount of food produce being 'wasted' and thrown out due to 'over supply'.

 

If the endgame is to have the population in complete servitude, or lazing on the sofa in front of the TV with its 24hr propaganda stream, we can't have people choosing what they want to eat by preparing and making it themselves, thats far too time-consuming.

 

You can control the food supply by controlling what the people can order for delivery "from the menu". If its not on any menu, you can't have it.

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On 1/21/2021 at 5:16 AM, Jikwan said:

If you have control of all things food

You control the people

 

Yes. That was what codex alimentarius was about

 

But it's not just food production, it is any small business that is not owned by the corporate elites, that they are looking to destroy

 

They want everyone helplessly dependent on the technocratic corporations for every aspect of their life. They're coming after all of it

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1 minute ago, Macnamara said:

 

Yes. That was what codex alimentarius was about

 

But it's not just food production, it is any small business that is not owned by the corporate elites, that they are looking to destroy

 

They want everyone helplessly dependent on the technocratic corporations for every aspect of their life. They're coming after all of it

Absolutely. Couldnt have put it better myself

These kinds of hard facts dont win you friends

Not very uplifting. But what kind of uplifting statements can you use these days...?

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1 minute ago, Jikwan said:

These kinds of hard facts dont win you friends

 

That's ok....i'm not in it to make friends

 

The only uplifting thing is to start taking the power back through your own life choices and actions; this requires looking at what the cabal are trying to get you to do and then doing the opposite

Edited by Macnamara
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9 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

 

 

Going back to your original post, "total control of food".

 

This is one way of doing so, by somehow 'encouraging' people to not even bother preparing meals at home, but become reliant on meal deliveries.

 

Prior to the lockdowns, you only have to look around and see this falling into place already.

 

Convenience stores and petrol stations selling pre-packed sandwiches, wraps and pasta pots. Grabbing 'lunch' from a local takeaway, or from a fast-food giant such as McDonalds or Burger King.

 

"Food on the go" - people either eat in their cars, or at their desks at work. Or in the evening, grab a KFC family meal deal, pizza or Chinese take-out and munch away on the sofa in front of the TV.

 

A lot of people just simply either "can't be bothered to cook" or they "don't have the time".

 

"It's far more convenient to just order a takeaway."

 

So yes, I can foresee at time where cooking at home becomes obsolete, and then there is no need for massive supermarkets with loads of fresh produce in stock, which if not purchased before the 'best before date' simply ends up being thrown away.

 

Oh yeah, and expect that to become a 'thing' at some point in the near future, the amount of food produce being 'wasted' and thrown out due to 'over supply'.

 

If the endgame is to have the population in complete servitude, or lazing on the sofa in front of the TV with its 24hr propaganda stream, we can't have people choosing what they want to eat by preparing and making it themselves, thats far too time-consuming.

 

You can control the food supply by controlling what the people can order for delivery "from the menu". If its not on any menu, you can't have it.

It all makes great sense to me, man

Not only wanting control of the food, they control what you eat

Cooking your own....you can largely escape their continuos efforts to poison you and your family

We can take advantage of the time we have left for cooking our own food, even starting up or maintaining a small garden

 

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28 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

But it's not just food production, it is any small business that is not owned by the corporate elites, that they are looking to destroy

 

They want everyone helplessly dependent on the technocratic corporations for every aspect of their life. They're coming after all of it

 

I agree, but in the short term, small independent kitchens/eateries will 'be allowed' to participate in schemes such as Deliveroo, Just Eat, Uber Eats et al.

 

But eventually I can see a point where they all get 'swallowed up' into big corporates, probably via 'franchising' schemes. Just like Subway and McDonalds.

 

Any 'local diversity' or variety ends up vanishing, and the only places you can order from will all offer the same 'standard' menu, across the country.

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35 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

 

That's ok....i'm not in it to make friends

 

The only uplifting thing is to start taking the power back through your own life choices and actions; this requires looking at what the cabal are trying to get you to do and then doing the opposite

Sounds good, sounds about right.

Theres a number of people been doing just what you say for over a year already. They are scattered about amongst hordes who just dont care. When you add the numbers it kind of looks impressive but it LACKS FORCE.

We could keep doing those same things for another year and get similar results

Meanwhile the great machines that are collapsing our world have been running non stop

Its too slow and has no force

Im looking for something a little more out of the box idea to solve these huge problems

Keep on trucking man. Your posts give a strong effect

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2 hours ago, Jikwan said:

Its too slow and has no force

Im looking for something a little more out of the box idea to solve these huge problems

Farmers’ Protests Reflect Existential Crisis of Indian Agriculture

Global Research, January 21, 2021

With over 800 million people, rural India is arguably the most interesting and complex place on the planet but is plagued by farmer suicides, child malnourishment, growing unemployment, increased informalisation, indebtedness and an overall collapse of agriculture.

Given that India is still an agrarian-based society, renowned journalist P Sainath says what is taking place can be described as a crisis of civilisation proportions and can be explained in just five words: hijack of agriculture by corporations. He notes the process by which it is being done in five words too: predatory commercialisation of the countryside. And another five words to describe the outcome: biggest displacement in our history.

In late November 2018, a charter was released by the All India Kisan Sangharsh Coordination Committee (an umbrella group of around 250 farmers’ organisations) to coincide with the massive, well-publicised farmers’ march that was then taking place in Delhi.

The charter stated:

“Farmers are not just a residue from our past; farmers, agriculture and village India are integral to the future of India and the world; as bearers of historic knowledge, skills and culture; as agents of food safety, security and sovereignty; and as guardians of biodiversity and ecological sustainability.”

The farmers stated that they were alarmed at the economic, ecological, social and existential crisis of Indian agriculture as well as the persistent state neglect of the sector and discrimination against farming communities.

They were also concerned about the deepening penetration of large, predatory and profit hungry corporations, farmers’ suicide across the country and the unbearable burden of indebtedness and the widening disparities between farmers and other sectors.

The charter called on the Indian parliament to immediately hold a special session to pass and enact two bills that were of, by and for the farmers of India.

If passed by parliament, among other things, the Farmers’ Freedom from Indebtedness Bill 2018 would have provided for the complete loan waiver for all farmers and agricultural workers.

The second bill, The Farmers’ Right to Guaranteed Remunerative Minimum Support Prices for Agricultural Commodities Bill 2018, would have seen the government take measures to bring down the input cost of farming through specific regulation of the prices of seeds, agriculture machinery and equipment, diesel, fertilisers and insecticides, while making purchase of farm produce below the minimum support price (MSP) both illegal and punishable.

The charter also called for a special discussion on the universalisation of the public distribution system, the withdrawal of pesticides that have been banned elsewhere and the non-approval of genetically engineered seeds without a comprehensive need and impact assessment.

Other demands included no foreign direct investment in agriculture and food processing, the protection of farmers from corporate plunder in the name of contract farming, investment in farmers’ collectives to create farmer producer organisations and peasant cooperatives and the promotion of agroecology based on suitable cropping patterns and local seed diversity revival.

Now in 2020, rather than responding to these requirements, we see the Indian government’s promotion and facilitation of – by way of recent legislation – the corporatisation of agriculture and the dismantling of the public distribution system (and the MSP) as well as the laying of groundwork for contract farming.

This legislation comprises three acts: The Farmers’ Produce Trade and Commerce (Promotion and Facilitation) Act 2020, Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement on Price Assurance and Farm Services Act 2020 and Essential Commodities (Amendment) Act 2020

Although the two aforementioned bills from 2018 have now lapsed, farmers are demanding that the new pro-corporate (anti-farmer) farms laws are replaced with a legal framework that guarantees the MSP to farmers.

According to an article by the Research Unit for Political Economy (RUPE), it is clear that the existence of MSPs, the Food Corporation of India, the public distribution system and publicly held buffer stocks constitute an obstacle to the profit-driven requirements of global agribusiness interests who have sat with government agencies and set out their wish-lists.

RUPE notes that India accounts for 15 per cent of world consumption of cereals. India’s buffer stocks are equivalent to 15-25 per cent of world stocks and 40 per cent of world trade in rice and wheat. Any large reduction in these stocks will almost certainly affect world prices: farmers would be hit by depressed prices; later, once India became dependent on imports, prices could rise on the international market and Indian consumers would be hit.

At the same time, the richer countries are applying enormous pressure on India to scrap its meagre agricultural subsidies; yet their own subsidies are vast multiples of India’s. The end result could be India becoming dependent on imports and the restructure of its own agriculture to crops destined for export.

RUPE concludes:

“Vast buffer stocks would still exist; but instead of India holding these stocks, they would be held by multinational trading firms, and India would bid for them with borrowed funds.”

Instead of holding physical buffer stocks, India would hold foreign exchange reserves.

Successive administrations have made the country dependent on volatile flows of foreign capital and India’s foreign exchange reserves have been built up by borrowing and foreign investments. The fear of capital flight is ever present. Policies are often governed by the drive to attract and retain these inflows and maintain market confidence by ceding to the demands of international capital.

This throttling of democracy and the ‘financialisation’ of agriculture would seriously undermine the nation’s food security and leave almost 1.4 billion people at the mercy of international speculators and foreign investment.

But agricapital’s free-for-all bonanza and the planned displacement of tens of millions of cultivators mirrors what has been happening across the world for many decades: the consolidation of a global food regime based on agro-export mono-cropping (often with non-food commodities taking up prime agricultural land) linked to sovereign debt repayment and foreign exchange inflows and earnings and World Bank/IMF ‘structural adjustment’ directives.

The outcomes have included a displacement of a food-producing peasantry, the dominance of Western agri-food oligopolies and the transformation of countries from food self-sufficiency to food deficiency. Little wonder then that among the owners of global agribusiness family firm Cargill 14 are now billionaires – the very company that profited from running down India’s edible oils sector in the 1990s.

It is not that India needs these people. It is already the world’s largest producer of milk, pulses and millets and the second-largest producer of rice, wheat, sugarcane, groundnuts, vegetables, fruit and cotton. This is despite India’s farmers already reeling from the effects of 30 years of neoliberal policies, decades of public underinvestment/disinvestment and a deliberate strategy to displace them at the behest of the World Bank and predatory global agri-food corporations.

If unrepealed, the recent legislation represents the ultimate betrayal of India’s farmers and democracy as well as the final surrender of food security and food sovereignty to unaccountable corporations. This legislation is wholly regressive and will eventually lead to the country relying on outside forces  to feed its population – and a possible return to hand-to-mouth imports, especially in an increasingly volatile world prone to conflict, public health scares, unregulated land and commodity speculation and price shocks.

A shift towards food sovereignty – encompassing local people’s right to healthy and culturally appropriate food and their ability to define and control their own food and agriculture systems – is key to achieving genuine independence, national sovereignty, food security and facilitating farmers’ demands.

*

Note to readers: please click the share buttons above or below. Forward this article to your email lists. Crosspost on your blog site, internet forums. etc.

Colin Todhunter is a frequent contributor to Global Research and Asia-Pacific Research.

https://www.globalresearch.ca/farmers-protests-reflect-existential-crisis-indian-agriculture/5734989

 
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Italy on brink of 'civil disobedience' as public defies 'absurd' coronavirus rules

ITALY businesses have begun to act out against the Government's coronavirus regulations with small acts of "civil disobedience".

PUBLISHED: 16:23, Sat, Jan 16, 2021 | UPDATED: 17:16, Sat, Jan 16, 2021
 
The mass civil disobedience campaign —  launched under the hashtag #IoApro (#IOpen)
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If these people are let go and get to their ends they'll very soon have made the whole West into a food, health and media dictatorship... COVID-19 is a real-scale simulation of it...

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17 hours ago, Macnamara said:

Farmers’ Protests Reflect Existential Crisis of Indian Agriculture

Global Research, January 21, 2021

With over 800 million people, rural India is arguably the most interesting and complex place on the planet but is plagued by farmer suicides, child malnourishment, growing unemployment, increased informalisation, indebtedness and an overall collapse of agriculture.

Given that India is still an agrarian-based society, renowned journalist P Sainath says what is taking place can be described as a crisis of civilisation proportions and can be explained in just five words: hijack of agriculture by corporations. He notes the process by which it is being done in five words too: predatory commercialisation of the countryside. And another five words to describe the outcome: biggest displacement in our history.

In late November 2018, a charter was released by the All India Kisan Sangharsh Coordination Committee (an umbrella group of around 250 farmers’ organisations) to coincide with the massive, well-publicised farmers’ march that was then taking place in Delhi.

The charter stated:

“Farmers are not just a residue from our past; farmers, agriculture and village India are integral to the future of India and the world; as bearers of historic knowledge, skills and culture; as agents of food safety, security and sovereignty; and as guardians of biodiversity and ecological sustainability.”

The farmers stated that they were alarmed at the economic, ecological, social and existential crisis of Indian agriculture as well as the persistent state neglect of the sector and discrimination against farming communities.

They were also concerned about the deepening penetration of large, predatory and profit hungry corporations, farmers’ suicide across the country and the unbearable burden of indebtedness and the widening disparities between farmers and other sectors.

The charter called on the Indian parliament to immediately hold a special session to pass and enact two bills that were of, by and for the farmers of India.

If passed by parliament, among other things, the Farmers’ Freedom from Indebtedness Bill 2018 would have provided for the complete loan waiver for all farmers and agricultural workers.

The second bill, The Farmers’ Right to Guaranteed Remunerative Minimum Support Prices for Agricultural Commodities Bill 2018, would have seen the government take measures to bring down the input cost of farming through specific regulation of the prices of seeds, agriculture machinery and equipment, diesel, fertilisers and insecticides, while making purchase of farm produce below the minimum support price (MSP) both illegal and punishable.

The charter also called for a special discussion on the universalisation of the public distribution system, the withdrawal of pesticides that have been banned elsewhere and the non-approval of genetically engineered seeds without a comprehensive need and impact assessment.

Other demands included no foreign direct investment in agriculture and food processing, the protection of farmers from corporate plunder in the name of contract farming, investment in farmers’ collectives to create farmer producer organisations and peasant cooperatives and the promotion of agroecology based on suitable cropping patterns and local seed diversity revival.

Now in 2020, rather than responding to these requirements, we see the Indian government’s promotion and facilitation of – by way of recent legislation – the corporatisation of agriculture and the dismantling of the public distribution system (and the MSP) as well as the laying of groundwork for contract farming.

This legislation comprises three acts: The Farmers’ Produce Trade and Commerce (Promotion and Facilitation) Act 2020, Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement on Price Assurance and Farm Services Act 2020 and Essential Commodities (Amendment) Act 2020

Although the two aforementioned bills from 2018 have now lapsed, farmers are demanding that the new pro-corporate (anti-farmer) farms laws are replaced with a legal framework that guarantees the MSP to farmers.

According to an article by the Research Unit for Political Economy (RUPE), it is clear that the existence of MSPs, the Food Corporation of India, the public distribution system and publicly held buffer stocks constitute an obstacle to the profit-driven requirements of global agribusiness interests who have sat with government agencies and set out their wish-lists.

RUPE notes that India accounts for 15 per cent of world consumption of cereals. India’s buffer stocks are equivalent to 15-25 per cent of world stocks and 40 per cent of world trade in rice and wheat. Any large reduction in these stocks will almost certainly affect world prices: farmers would be hit by depressed prices; later, once India became dependent on imports, prices could rise on the international market and Indian consumers would be hit.

At the same time, the richer countries are applying enormous pressure on India to scrap its meagre agricultural subsidies; yet their own subsidies are vast multiples of India’s. The end result could be India becoming dependent on imports and the restructure of its own agriculture to crops destined for export.

RUPE concludes:

“Vast buffer stocks would still exist; but instead of India holding these stocks, they would be held by multinational trading firms, and India would bid for them with borrowed funds.”

Instead of holding physical buffer stocks, India would hold foreign exchange reserves.

Successive administrations have made the country dependent on volatile flows of foreign capital and India’s foreign exchange reserves have been built up by borrowing and foreign investments. The fear of capital flight is ever present. Policies are often governed by the drive to attract and retain these inflows and maintain market confidence by ceding to the demands of international capital.

This throttling of democracy and the ‘financialisation’ of agriculture would seriously undermine the nation’s food security and leave almost 1.4 billion people at the mercy of international speculators and foreign investment.

But agricapital’s free-for-all bonanza and the planned displacement of tens of millions of cultivators mirrors what has been happening across the world for many decades: the consolidation of a global food regime based on agro-export mono-cropping (often with non-food commodities taking up prime agricultural land) linked to sovereign debt repayment and foreign exchange inflows and earnings and World Bank/IMF ‘structural adjustment’ directives.

The outcomes have included a displacement of a food-producing peasantry, the dominance of Western agri-food oligopolies and the transformation of countries from food self-sufficiency to food deficiency. Little wonder then that among the owners of global agribusiness family firm Cargill 14 are now billionaires – the very company that profited from running down India’s edible oils sector in the 1990s.

It is not that India needs these people. It is already the world’s largest producer of milk, pulses and millets and the second-largest producer of rice, wheat, sugarcane, groundnuts, vegetables, fruit and cotton. This is despite India’s farmers already reeling from the effects of 30 years of neoliberal policies, decades of public underinvestment/disinvestment and a deliberate strategy to displace them at the behest of the World Bank and predatory global agri-food corporations.

If unrepealed, the recent legislation represents the ultimate betrayal of India’s farmers and democracy as well as the final surrender of food security and food sovereignty to unaccountable corporations. This legislation is wholly regressive and will eventually lead to the country relying on outside forces  to feed its population – and a possible return to hand-to-mouth imports, especially in an increasingly volatile world prone to conflict, public health scares, unregulated land and commodity speculation and price shocks.

A shift towards food sovereignty – encompassing local people’s right to healthy and culturally appropriate food and their ability to define and control their own food and agriculture systems – is key to achieving genuine independence, national sovereignty, food security and facilitating farmers’ demands.

*

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Colin Todhunter is a frequent contributor to Global Research and Asia-Pacific Research.

https://www.globalresearch.ca/farmers-protests-reflect-existential-crisis-indian-agriculture/5734989

 

Thankyou. Thats a good example of the force im looking out for

I still maintain the view that all these resisters (say, 10%) scattered amongst the uncaring hordes amount to little effect. They do produce an effect

Its like a strong guy, he wacks one of the wheels of a big truck with a sledgehammer. He buckles the wheel. Finishing his breakfast, the driver returns to his 10 wheel truck starts her up and drives into the distance

Scattered resisters cannot make big changes. They need to be organized, have good leadership and money to finance it all.

Interesting, people dont talk much about money.

Without money, nothing is possible

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