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On 4/5/2022 at 7:47 PM, Macnamara said:

 

Also concerned about the future online.

IPFS is a fully distributed system.

Been perusing IPFS to try to glean more info about it.

https://ipfs.io/

https://www.howtogeek.com/784295/what-is-the-interplanetary-file-system-ipfs/

https://hackernoon.com/a-beginners-guide-to-ipfs-20673fedd3f

https://theconsciousresistance.com/the-activation-2-how-to-be-free-with-web3/

 

see what you think - interesting ?!

 

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20 minutes ago, zarkov said:

 

Also concerned about the future online.

IPFS is a fully distributed system.

Been perusing IPFS to try to glean more info about it.

https://ipfs.io/

https://www.howtogeek.com/784295/what-is-the-interplanetary-file-system-ipfs/

https://hackernoon.com/a-beginners-guide-to-ipfs-20673fedd3f

https://theconsciousresistance.com/the-activation-2-how-to-be-free-with-web3/

 

see what you think - interesting ?!

 

 

Basically, it's just a torrenting system (where I get most of my movies, ebooks and software from! ... Did I just say that? 😱).

 

Of course, as with torrents, the success of IPFS will depend on the number of seeders. Anyone who has ever tried to download from a torrent site will know that some popular files have thousands of seeders and are available whenever you want them, whereas other files have no seeders at all and may have been added years ago, so there's little chance of being able to download the file.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by webtrekker
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Our Stories

SSRI Stories is a collection of over 7,000 stories most of which were published newspapers or scientific journals.  In these stories, prescription antidepressant medications are mentioned.  Common to all of them is the possibility – sometimes the near certainty – that the drugs caused or were a contributing factor to some negative outcome: suicide, violence, serious physical problems, bad withdrawal reactions, personality change leading to loss of reputation and relationships, etc.

This updated site includes the stories from the previous site and new ones from 2011 to date.  We have used a new “category” classification system on the new stories.  We are working back through previously SSRI Stories to bring them into the new classification system.  In the meantime use the search box in the upper right column to search through both the old and the new stories.

SSRI Stories focuses primarily on problems caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), of which Prozac (fluoxetine) was the first. For more see About SSRIs.  Other medications prescribed as antidepressants that fit the “nightmares” theme of the collected stories are sometimes included.

World Suicide Prevention Day

September 10, 2020 is designated Suicide Prevention Day, and has been piously promoted as an exercise in increased awareness.  If it really were that, there would be mention among the reams of  information and advice of one of the main causes of suicide: psychiatric medications including SSRI antidepressants.  These medications have destroyed many lives.  It is well established that they cause suicidality in some people – people who are not depressed – yet in all the media hoopla about suicide prevention, these meds might as well not exist, for all the coverage they get.

The media used to know how damaging these medications can be.  Stories from the 1990s on this website prove that.  But after years of marketing of psych meds, and years of lawsuits failing because of system flaws, the media now go along with the pharma mantra that antidepressants save lives.  There is not a shred of evidence that this is true, and plenty of evidence that these drugs cause emormous harm.  But the press that supposedly prides itself in unbiased reporting simply chooses not to know.

Behind the scenes at the NHS

SSRIstories is dedicated to posting news articles about antidepressant problems.  A few of us have long suspected that many suicides and homicides in the news are medication-induced even though medication is never mentioned, and where no contributory role is suspected by officialdom.  There is a U.K. organization called Hundredfamilies  (http://www.hundredfamilies.org/ ) that is concerned about homicides committed by “mentally ill” people, and wants the government to do more to prevent these deaths.  In fact, the NHS often does review or investigate such cases, where a perpetrator was receiving mental health care from them. These independent reviews offer a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes.

https://ssristories.org/

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The Great Starvation is Coming, And The World Must Prepare For It: The Great Depression brought the prosperous American empire to its knees. Money and industry dried up almost overnight, along with the nation’s food resources.

 
These food-stretching strategies will give you the freedom to need less, waste less, and make more with what you have.
 

Reuse Cooking Liquid Instead Of Throwing It Away

Some foods cooked in water are as good as liquid gold.

When you boil corn cobs, for example, the remaining water is full of vitamin B, folic acid, and iron.

You can use it as a soup base or for making a compost tea for your garden.

Some people enjoy the taste of corn water alone or drink it for its alleged benefits for the hair, skin, and nails. It’s even said that corn water can increase energy and fend off anemia.

Potato water is another great and reusable cooking liquid. You can use potato water to make gravy without using any other thickeners.

To do this, just add a bit of potato water to some fat or pan drippings and stir until it thickens. As you enjoy your gravy, take pride in knowing that you created something delicious from scraps most people would have thrown away.

Corn and potato water aren’t the only cooking waters you can use though. You can also use rice water, bean water, beet water, pasta water, bones, tuna can water, and many others.

Get creative and try new things. Just be sure to use the water within a day or so to prevent the risk of fermentation. However, if you know how to safely can or ferment foods, you can add that to your food stretching skillset too.

Learn Food Preservation Techniques

Food preservation techniques are great skills to learn when trying to stretch your meals.

When your produce supply is starting to look a little rough around the edges, you can increase the nutrient content and lengthen its shelf life by fermenting it.

Eating fermented foods aids digestion, boosts nutrient bioavailability, and promotes the production of healthy bacteria in your gut.

This can help keep your immune system in good shape in a time that could bring sickness and malnutrition.

During the great depression though, canning and drying foods at home was a big hit. Home-canned food kept families fed during much of this period.

Having a good grasp on safe preservation methods like canning, fermenting, dehydrating, and drying will make you that much more prepared in the event of an economic crisis like the great depression.

Bulk Up Your Meats With Fillers

 

When meat is too expensive or hard to find in stores, you may need to get comfortable with needing less of it. Meat prices have risen significantly in the past year.

To stretch meat portions, mix it with foods like oats, barley, lentils, rice, beans, and vegetables to add bulk.

During the great depression, meatless loaves — made with little to no actual meat — were a very popular dish.

Some great depression-era meatless loaf recipes appear to use everything and anything they had on hand.

Popular ingredients included peanuts, carrots, beans, pickles, raisins, potatoes, spices, stale bread, and just about anything else they could find.

Cut Portion Sizes

 

Unfortunately, learning to need less food will be one of the biggest setbacks for the modern western person if they’re ever faced with a crisis.

During troubled times it will be physically more difficult for some people to give up the three meals a day they’ve become accustomed to.

Depending on who you ask, the three-meal-per-day norm was dubbed the standard after European settlers came to America out of a desire to ritualize eating habits to separate humans from grazing animals. Other sources point to the 40-hour work week and the industrial revolution as the culprit.

At any rate, our biological, normal appetite – in other words, eating when you’re actually feeling hungry – is not only a much healthier way of living, but it may become less of a choice and more of a necessity one day.

Learning to take natural hunger cues from your body instead of training your body to feel hungry on a set schedule will help you need less and consequently, have more.

 

Save Bones For Later Use

It always makes me wince a little when I see someone trimming the fat and bones only to throw them right in the trash. You can use meat animal bones to make so many different food items.

You can throw them in a pot of boiling water for a few hours to make a rich bone broth.

Once the broth cools, skim the fat layer from the top to keep for cooking. Depending on the bone type, you can even suck the marrow for a fast nutrient boost or use it as you would with butter on bread.

To preserve your bone broth, you can freeze or pressure-can it for future use. Bones kept in an airtight bag and placed in the freezer can last up to 6 months. Sometimes, you can find stock bones at your local butcher or grocery store so you don’t have to bother with freezing.

Once you’re done boiling your bones to make broth and solidified fat, you can still get even more use out of them. Grind them to make bone meal or grist for your garden and other projects.

Save Fats

Fat trimmings are as valuable as bones, if not more so.

For example, bacon grease is arguably the easiest fat to render, but most people are missing out by throwing it away.

You can use it as you would with butter or cooking oil.

It stores nicely in the refrigerator for anywhere from 3 months to a year. For those not fond of relying on refrigeration, you can keep strained bacon grease at room temperature for up to a month. However, other rendered fats — such as tallow, lard, and ghee — can be pressure-canned for longer storage.

Some folks like to collect and freeze fat trimmings overtime. Still, unless you’re lucky enough to have an icehouse, there’s always the risk of your fat going rancid in a power outage.

To avoid this, it’s a good idea to buy cuts of meat with a lot of fat you can use all at once. You can also ask your butcher if they will save extra fat trimmings for you. They’ll likely be very happy to get rid of it.

Once you have enough, you can render the fat to make cracklings, schmaltz, pork lard, and beef tallow. You can use rendered fat in candle making, soap making, cooking, waterproofing, medicinal salves, and more.

Buy Organ Meats And Other “Undesirable” Cuts

If you don’t want to give up the health benefits of eating red meat, consider buying the cuts no one seems to want.

Most of the time, these are the healthier cuts with the highest protein and essential nutrient content.

For example, one serving of beef liver has over 20g of protein.

It also has high amounts of vitamins B and A, iron, copper, and phosphorous.

Traditionally, unwanted cuts get a bad reputation as they take more effort to prepare in a way that tastes good.

The history of soul food in America is one of many examples of how lesser cuts – when properly prepared and slowly cooked – are some of the most deliciously tender meats around. Knowing this, it can be argued that underrated cuts might actually have the biggest flavor potential.

Aside from beef liver, learning how to properly cook with offal meats like tongue, brain, feet, stomach, hearts, and other such foods is an underrated and valuable survival skill.

Learn To Forage Near Your Home

You’d be surprised how many palatable, nutritious foods are outside waiting to be harvested. The biggest problem is that most people dismiss them as weeds or think they’re unsafe to eat.

Once we take the time to learn about the edible wild plants in our area though, a whole new world opens up for us.

In the Ozarks region of the US for example, you can find wild ginger, dandelions, watercress, elderberries, leeks, mushrooms, and more by simply walking outside your front door.

In contrast, dryer regions such as the Sonoran Desert in Arizona have prickly pear fruit, nopales, amaranth, agave, and wildflowers, just to name a few. These are all freely available edible foods that most people overlook.

When you learn about safe foraging practices and learn what grows in your area, you can always find ways to supplement and bulk up your food supply.

During the Great Depression, life wasn’t easy. Yet, some people who survived chose to live the rest of their lives with the same frugality — even though the depression ended. In fact, some Great Depression era recipes are still passed down to younger generations today.

We may or may not experience similar hardships in our lifetimes, but it’s never a bad idea to work toward making what you have go further. When we learn how to stretch food like our grandmothers and great-grandmothers did, we learn how to need less and do more with what we have.

https://thelostsens.blogspot.com/2022/07/the-great-starvation-is-coming-and.html

Edited by Macnamara
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#CashEveryDay

By the Solari Team

As the saying goes, “money makes the world go around,” but today’s battle of digital currencies, inflation, and paper currency has humanity at a tipping point between freedom and fascism.

The pandemic and accompanying lockdowns have been wildly successful, creating the right environment for total control of society, health, money, and food. Huge portions of the population, influenced by fear and mind control, are in complete submission. Every aspect of life and how it functions is now approaching Mr. Global’s grasp.

Why the need for total control? Who knows…. People like Catherine and Dr. Joseph Farrell have spent decades trying to figure it out; no doubt they are close. The reality is, however, that we have no more time to figure out why. Humanity is in the middle of the train tracks, and the train is coming through the tunnel and toward us at full force.

There is an overwhelming feeling of “what to do?” I can understand how a deer gets stuck when the headlights are coming at it. Fear can be paralyzing. But we all can do something and that something is pretty simple: use cash, especially on Fridays.

Some of us are Christians, some not. We don’t all know the purpose of eating only fish on Fridays, but it seems to many that Fridays are a day to prep for something bigger, such as Good Friday. In American culture, we have a lot of Friday events: summer Fridays, half-day Fridays, dress-down Fridays. When Mary Holland from Children’s Health Defense suggested Cash Fridays, it made perfect sense to Catherine.

Why cash? Because in order to have a full digital monetary system with complete central control, the circulation of paper currency has to end. (See the above video of Bank for International Settlements General Manager Agustín Carstens in October 2020, telling you exactly where the central bankers intend to go.) We’ve already heard there are coin shortages. Some are saying that the Fed has stopped printing paper currency. That can’t be confirmed, but it doesn’t really matter. We know the game. To slow this train down, we can keep paper currencies and coins circulating. This is a very easy thing for all of us to do.

There are a lot of divide-and-conquer politics out there. People are fighting for the stupidest reasons. We bet a dollar, however, that the one thing we ALL can agree on is stopping our money from being stolen or controlled – keeping our money safe. It wouldn’t shock us if even the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) or Black Lives Matter (BLM) could agree on that. So it’s simple: We don’t need 100% of the population to do this; 10% of the population is enough.

Keep cash floating through the system.

ACTION PLAN

1. Use cash whenever you can.

2. Download the #CashEveryDay slogan and spread it on all your social media platforms. It’s especially important not to type out #CashEveryDay because of algorithms and censorship.

3. Keep it going for as long as it takes.

It’s as simple as 1, 2, and 3. But if you really want to take it further, we are including links on how to find a local bank and other reports on how to take big bank and corporate tyranny out of your life. We are making these reports available to the public to add strength to the momentum.

So, let’s make Cash Every Day the preparation for something bigger – and that something bigger is sovereignty and freedom for all humanity.

Last week, as Catherine drove through the Alps with Swiss-Hungarian freedom fighter Orsolya Győrffy, they stopped for dinner at Ristorante CowBoy and, it being Friday, paid with cash. Here is Catherine’s #CashEveryDay Receipt #1:

CashFriday-receipt-678.jpg

We can do this.

https://home.solari.com/cash-friday/

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On 7/27/2022 at 9:17 PM, Macnamara said:

The Great Starvation is Coming, And The World Must Prepare For It: The Great Depression brought the prosperous American empire to its knees. Money and industry dried up almost overnight, along with the nation’s food resources.

 

I belong to a homesteading forum which shares many suggestions for home produce. My latest experiment is to try growing perennial vegetables to reduce the tendency for gluts at certain times of year, as well as reducing the workload by avoiding re-sowing annually. So far the cottager's kale, lamb's lettuce and Jerusalem  artichokes are growing and cropping well but I've yet to see how many years they survive. The Good King Henry (perennial spinach) is proving hard to germinate but I'll keep trying. 

Edited by Campion
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10 hours ago, Campion said:

I belong to a homesteading forum which shares many suggestions for home produce. My latest experiment is to try growing perennial vegetables to reduce the tendency for gluts at certain times of year, as well as reducing the workload by avoiding re-sowing annually. So far the cottager's kale, lamb's lettuce and Jerusalem  artichokes are growing and cropping well but I've yet to see how many years they survive. The Good King Henry (perennial spinach) is proving hard to germinate but I'll keep trying. 

 

So I guess a consideration in terms of a breakdown in food supply is bridging through the hungry gap in the spring, which requires more than leaves. It will require root vegetables stored from the previous year.  Over time pests and disease might become an issue with perennials which would require new ones to be reseeded in fresh soil. Resowing each year does allow some rotation.

 

Each area of the country is going to have its own climate so i guess some trial and error is needed. The other issue is space and how best to utilise that. There's lots that we would do if we had more space but we are having to work within those limitations.

 

There are going to be very few people who can become fully self-sufficient because they won't have enough land and generally those that have enough land won't seek to become self-sufficient! So we are always going to have to rely on community and that's where we can build up contacts who can provide organic dairy and meat.

 

We have been making pesto out of our carrot tops and using beetroot, turnips and radish leaves as general greens in soups for example. I've started eating the leaves on strawberries instead of cutting them off as they are apparently very good for you. Fermenting and pickling are also good ways to preserve foods. Some leaves are forageable too for forest salads like hawthorn and lime leaves if things get really tough

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Yeah, crop rotation, pests & diseases is a big issue. I don't expect perennial to mean decades: perhaps a few years is more realistic. And my local area, soil type etc will affect which pests & diseases are a problem. 
   
Potatoes are a mainstay for growing calories to store over winter, tho I have limited space so tend to grow higher value crops like tomatoes in the potato section of my rotation.  It's occurred to me that as well as food, having control of a supply of healthy drinking water is equally important. 

 

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Ellen Brown: The Food Shortage Solution in Your Own Backyard

by EditorJune 8, 2022
While the global food systems we depend on come under increasing strain, there’s a solution to the growing crisis that most Americans can find in their own backyards–or front lawns.

A confluence of crises—lockdowns and business closures, mandates and worker shortages, supply chain disruptions and inflation, sanctions and war—have compounded to trigger food shortages; and we have been warned that they may last longer than the food stored in our pantries. What to do? 

Jim Gale, founder of Food Forest Abundance, pointed out in a recent interview with Del Bigtree that in the United States there are 40 million acres of lawn. Lawns are the most destructive monoculture on the planet, absorbing more resources and pesticides than any other crop, without providing any yield. If we were to turn 30% of that lawn into permaculture-based food gardens, says Gale, we could be food self-sufficient without relying on imports or chemicals. 

Permaculture is a gardening technique that “uses the inherent qualities of plants and animals combined with the natural characteristics of landscapes and structures to produce a life-supporting system for city and country, using the smallest practical area.”

Russian families have shown the possibilities, using permaculture methods on simple cottage gardens or allotments called dachas. As Dr. Leon Sharashkin, a Russian translator and editor with a PhD in forestry from the University of Missouri, explains:

“Essentially, what Russian gardeners do is demonstrate that gardeners can feed the world – and you do not need any GMOs, industrial farms, or any other technological gimmicks to guarantee everybody’s got enough food to eat. Bear in mind that Russia only has 110 days of growing season per year – so in the US, for example, gardeners’ output could be substantially greater. Today, however, the area taken up by lawns in the US is two times greater than that of Russia’s gardens – and it produces nothing but a multi-billion-dollar lawn care industry.”

The Dacha Model

Dachas are small wooden houses on a small plot of land, typically just 600 meters (656 yards) in size. In Soviet Russia, they were allocated free of charge on the theory that the land belonged to the people. They were given to many public servants; and families not given a dacha could get access to a plot of land in an allotment association, where they could grow vegetables, visit regularly to tend their kitchen gardens and gather crops. 

Dachas were originally used mainly as country vacation getaways. But in the 1990s, they evolved from a place of rest into a major means of survival. That was when the Russian economy suffered from what journalist Anne Williamson called in congressional testimony the “rape of Russia.” The economy was destroyed and then plundered by financial oligarchs, who swooped in to buy assets at fire sale prices. 

Stripped of other resources, Russian families turned to their dachas to grow food. Dr. Sharaskin observed that the share of food gardening in national agriculture increased from 32% in 1990 to over 50% by 2000. In 2004, food gardens accounted for 51% of the total agricultural output of the Russian Federation – greater than the contribution of the whole electric power generation industry; greater than all of the forestry, wood-processing and pulp and paper industries; and significantly greater than the coal, natural gas and oil refining industries taken together.  

Dachas are now a codified right of Russian citizens. In 2003, the government signed the Private Garden Plot Act into law, granting citizens free plots of land ranging from 1 to 3 hectares each. (A hectare is about 2.5 acres.) Dr. Sharaskin opined in 2009 that “with 35 million families (70% of Russia’s population) … producing more than 40% of Russia’s agricultural output, this is in all likelihood the most extensive microscale food production practice in any industrially developed nation.” 

In a 2014 article titled “Dacha Gardens—Russia’s Amazing Model for Urban Agriculture”, Sara Pool wrote that Russia obtains “over 50% agricultural products from family garden plots. The backyard gardening model uses around 3% arable land, and accounts for roughly 92% of all Russian potatoes, 87% of all fruit, 77% vegetables, and 59% all Russian meat according to the Russian Federal State Statistic Service.”

Our Beautiful but Toxic and Wasteful Green Lawns

Rather than dachas, we in the West have pristine green lawns, which not only produce no food but involve chemical and mechanical maintenance that is a major contributor to water and air pollution. Lawns are the single largest irrigated crop in the U.S., covering nearly 32 million acres. This is a problem particularly in the western U.S. states, which are currently suffering from reduced food production due to drought. Data compiled by Urban Plantations from the EPA, the Public Policy Institute of California, and the Alliance for Water Efficiency suggests that gardens use 66% less water than lawns. In the U.S., fruits and vegetables are grown  on only about 10 million acres. In theory, then, if the space occupied by American lawns were converted to food gardens, the country could produce four times as many fruits and vegetables as it does now. 

A study from NASA scientists in collaboration with researchers in the Mountain West estimated that American lawns cover an area that is about the size of Texas and is three times larger than that used for any other irrigated crop in the United States.  The study was not, however, about the growth of lawns but about their impact on the environment and water resources. It found that “maintaining a well-manicured lawn uses up to 900 liters of water per person per day and reduces [carbon] sequestration effectiveness by up to 35 percent by adding emissions from fertilization and the operation of mowing equipment.” To combat water and pollution problems, some cities have advocated abandoning the great green lawn in favor of vegetable gardens, local native plants, meadows or just letting the grass die. But well-manicured lawns are an established U.S. cultural tradition; and some municipalities have banned front-yard gardens as not meeting neighborhood standards of aesthetics.  Some homeowners, however, have fought back. Florida ended up passing a law in July 2019 that prohibits towns from banning edible gardens for aesthetic reasons; and in California, a bill was passed in 2014 that allows yard use for “personal agriculture” (defined as “use of land where an individual cultivates edible plant crops for personal use or donation”). As noted in a Los Angeles Times op-ed

“The Legislature recognized that lawn care is resource intensive, with lawns being the largest irrigated crop in the United States offering no nutritional gain. Finding that 30% to 60% of residential water is used for watering lawns, the Legislature believes these resources could be allocated to more productive activities, including growing food, thus increasing access to healthy options for low-income individuals.”

Despite how large they loom in the American imagination, immaculate green lawns maintained by pesticides, herbicides and electric lawnmowers are a relatively recent cultural phenomenon in the United States. In the 1930s, chemicals were not recommended. Weeds were controlled either by pulling them by hand or by keeping chickens. Chemical use became popular only after World War II, and it has grown significantly since. According to the EPA, close to 80 million U.S. households spray 90 million pounds of pesticides and herbicides on their lawns each year. A 1999 study by the United States Geological Survey found that 99% of urban water streams contain pesticides, which pollute our drinking water and create serious health risks for wildlife, pets, and humans. Among other disorders, these chemicals are correlated with an increased risk of cancers, nervous system disorders, and a seven-fold increased risk of childhood leukemia. 

That’s just the pollution in our water supply. Other problems with our lawn fetish are air and noise pollution generated by gas-powered lawn and garden equipment. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that this equipment is responsible for 5% of U.S. air pollution. Americans use about 800 million gallons of gas per year just mowing their lawns.

Yet even people who recognize the downsides of lawnmowers and chemicals continue to use them, under pressure to keep up appearances for the sake of the neighborhood. That cultural bias could change, however, in the face of serious food shortages. And while yards left to dirt and weeds may be unsightly, well-maintained permaculture gardens are aesthetically appealing without the use of chemicals or mowing. Here are a couple of examples, the first of a dacha and the second of a Pennsylvania community garden featured on the Neighborhood Gardens Trust website:

Dacha-Garden2.jpg?resize=780%2C519&ssl=1 [Stephen Scott / Small Farmers’ Journal] OvE8cTHlG_BVp3Ej7bmo0brqDe6ue5Cn8CK01d0V [Neighborhood Gardens Trust]

Homegrown Food: Organic, Non-GMO, and No Fossil Fuels Required

Local garden farming does not need chemical fertilizers or gas-guzzling machinery to thrive, as the Russian dacha farmers demonstrated.  Dr. Sharashkin wrote in his 2008 doctoral thesis:

“[T]he Soviet government had the policy of allowing dacha gardening only on marginal, unproductive, or overexploited lands that could not be used in state-run agriculture. And it is on exactly these lands that gardeners have consistently been producing large crops of vegetables and fruits ever since private gardens were re-authorized in 1941.… [M]ost of the gardeners grow their produce without chemical fertilizers.

When the practice [of industrial chemical use] subsided in the 1990s as the output of collective farming dwindled and was replaced by household production, significant abatement of environmental pollution with agrochemicals (especially that of watersheds) was observed.” [Emphasis added.]

Most of Russia’s garden produce is grown not only without agrochemicals but without genetically modified seeds, which were banned in Russia in 2016. As Mitchel Cohen reports in Covert Action Magazine, some GMO use has crept back in, but a bill for a full ban on the cultivation of genetically modified crops is currently making its way through the Duma (the ruling Russian assembly).

Growing your own food conserves petroleum resources not only because it requires no tractors or other machinery but because it needn’t be hauled over long distances in trucks, trains or ships. Food travels 1,500 miles on average before it gets to your dinner table, and nutrients are lost in the process. Families who cannot afford the healthy but pricey organic food in the supermarket can grow their own.

Prof. Sharaskin noted that gardens also have psychological benefits. He cited studies showing that personal interaction with plants can reduce stress, fear and fatigue, and can lower blood pressure and muscle tension. Gardening also reconnects us with our neighbors and the earth. Sharaskin quotes Leo Tolstoy:

“One of the first and universally acknowledged preconditions for happiness is living in close contact with nature, i.e., living under the open sky, in the light of the sun, in the fresh air; interacting with the earth, plants, and animals.”

From Crisis to Opportunity

Today, people in the West are undergoing something similar to the “rape of Russia” at the hands of financial oligarchs. Oligarchical giants like BlackRock and Blackstone come to mind, along with “the Davos crowd” – that exclusive cartel of international bankers, big businessmen, media, and politicians meeting annually at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland. 

WEF founder Klaus Schwab has declared the current confluence of crises to be “a rare but narrow window of opportunity to reflect, reimagine, and reset our world.” It is also a rare but narrow opportunity for us, the disenfranchised, to reclaim our plundered assets and the power to issue our own money, upgrading the economy in the service of the people and reimagining food systems and our own patches of land, however small. 

For food sustainability, we can take a lesson from the successful Russian dachas by forming our own family and community food gardens. Russia has also seen the burgeoning growth of eco-villages – subsistence communities made up of multiple family cottages, typically including community areas with a school, clinic, theater, and festival grounds. Forming self-sufficient communities and “going local” is a popular movement in the West today as well. 

A corollary is the independent cryptocurrency movement. We can combine these two movements to fund our local food gardens with food-backed community currencies or cryptocurrencies. Crypto “coins” bought now would act like forward contracts, serving as an advance against future productivity, redeemable at harvest time in agricultural produce. That subject will be explored in a follow-up article, coming shortly on ScheerPost.

Ellen Brown

Ellen Brown is a regular contributor to ScheerPost. She is an attorney, founder of the Public Banking Institute, and author of thirteen books including the best-selling Web of Debt. Her latest book is Banking on the People: Democratizing Money in the Digital Age and her 400+ blog articles are at EllenBrown.com.

https://scheerpost.com/2022/06/08/ellen-brown-the-food-shortage-solution-in-your-backyard/

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ancestral Kitchen

Alison Kay & Andrea Huehnerhoff

The Ancestral Kitchen is a twice-monthly podcast hosted by Alison, a European town-dweller and Andrea, living on a newly-created family farm in northwest Washington state. Pull up a chair at the table and join us as we talk about eating, cooking and living with ancient ancestral food wisdom in a modern-world kitchen.

 

Find us both on Instagram:

Andrea: www.instagram.com/farmandhearth

Alison: www.instagram.com/ancestral_kitchen

 

Podcast theme and audio production by Robert Michael Kay, find him at www.robertmichaelkay.com

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ancestral-kitchen/id1560950100

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13 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

Ancestral Kitchen

Alison Kay & Andrea Huehnerhoff

The Ancestral Kitchen is a twice-monthly podcast hosted by Alison, a European town-dweller and Andrea, living on a newly-created family farm in northwest Washington state. Pull up a chair at the table and join us as we talk about eating, cooking and living with ancient ancestral food wisdom in a modern-world kitchen.

 

Find us both on Instagram:

Andrea: www.instagram.com/farmandhearth

Alison: www.instagram.com/ancestral_kitchen

 

Podcast theme and audio production by Robert Michael Kay, find him at www.robertmichaelkay.com

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ancestral-kitchen/id1560950100

Thanks. Its my sort of thing. I dont use instagram. I can barely use this forum. Any other options?

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21 hours ago, Bombadil said:

Thanks. Its my sort of thing. I dont use instagram. I can barely use this forum. Any other options?

 

If like me you find forums easier to navigate, there's a good group for general homesteading at groups.io called Prudent Living https://prudent-living.groups.io/g/main but I'm not sure how much you can see without a login. 

 

"Here we are dedicated to teaching and sharing all things Frugal, Self-Sufficient and Self-Sustaining.
This is a group where we can collectively share and learn from others on how to DIY, whether it be gardening, home repairs, homesteading, self-reliance, self-sufficiency, permaculture, organics, making your own products, economical cooking, home remedies, auto repairs, and much, much more."

 

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On 9/4/2022 at 3:42 PM, Campion said:

If like me you find forums easier to navigate, there's a good group for general homesteading at groups.io called Prudent Living https://prudent-living.groups.io/g/main but I'm not sure how much you can see without a login. 

 

"Here we are dedicated to teaching and sharing all things Frugal, Self-Sufficient and Self-Sustaining.
This is a group where we can collectively share and learn from others on how to DIY, whether it be gardening, home repairs, homesteading, self-reliance, self-sufficiency, permaculture, organics, making your own products, economical cooking, home remedies, auto repairs, and much, much more."

 

Thanks campion, i'll check that out

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  • 2 weeks later...

Treatments for Vaccine Recipients

By Rhoda Wilson on September 16, 2022

Dr. Shoemaker: [Ivermectin is] the only medicine that helps you fight if you’ve got a vaccine injury. It’s the key to a vaccine injury protocol.  It’s time.  It’s time. This is over because the science is strong. The science is huge, that ivermectin is the thing that should always be available. But now that we’ve created this crisis, we need it even more. We need it even more in Canada, in everywhere.

Dr. Shoemaker: I want I ivermectin available for everybody. I don’t want you to have to go to the veterinary clinic or the veterinary store to get some of this medicine. It has to be made perfectly and ethically legal in all of your pharmacies.

Dr. Trozzi: For the treatment protocols, if like [Dr. Shoemaker], if you’ve had a couple of those injections or one of those injections and you got these spike proteins being produced by yourselves, go to the World Council for Health, go to the Spike Protein Detox Guide. Dr. Shoemaker is aware of that. The FLCCC do a great job [and] Canada Covid Care Alliance. These are very similar protocols. There’s a variety of things you can do, both natural and medicinal, including one of the safest, most effective medications in the history of mankind – ivermectin.

https://expose-news.com/2022/09/16/covid-injections-what-you-can-do-if-youve-had-one/

 

I may get hold of a copy of Dr Colemans book:

Your body can heal itself in nine out of ten illnesses

16th September 2022
I have described the many wonderful ways in which your body can look after itself in my book called Bodypower. The book explains how you can use your body’s self-healing powers to help you deal with 9 out of 10 illnesses without a doctor. It has been described as the owner’s manual for the human body.
Edited by Macnamara
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  • 2 weeks later...

To answer the question in the title of this piece i would say the answer is 'no' you can't reform these institutions. I would say that the answer now is to AGGRESSIVELY vote with your feet and by 'aggressively' i don't mean by stamping your feet in a loud manner! I mean you have to be really disciplined with yourself to reject and remove your custom from woke groups, companies and institutions. After Gillette made their woke advert i stopped buying gillette razors and have never used one since and that is what we have to do with EVERYTHING we disagree with. It has to be 'aggressive' because it will likely make your life more difficult to make changes so you have to be completely DETERMINED to vote not in a sham election every 5 years but WITH YOUR FEET every single day in what you give your money, time and attention to so that you don't just slip back into compromise to make your life that little bit easier.

 

If the national trust is pushing wokeism then DON'T PAY YOUR MEMBERSHIP until they stop their neo-marxist BS. If Tv becomes woke then get rid of your TV and stop paying your licence fee. If a museum goes woke then don't visit it and make it irrelevant. If a woke movie comes out DON'T go and see it. If you understand that the government wants to make currency digital so that it can turn you into a slave then go the extra yard of taking physical cash out of an ATM and THEN pay for your goods and services. You have to be a stubborn so-and-so and realise that freedom ain't gonna come for free. Its GOING TO TAKE EFFORT and DISCIPLINE....SELF-discipline to go the extra yard in order to make your life a living protest by making every choice you take the one that subverts their agenda to enslave you. THAT's what it will take and nothing less to get this done.

Can Woke Institutions be Salvaged or Must We Build Anew?

From Cambridge University to the Conservative Party, major institutions have been either taken over or infiltrated by the proponents of postmodernism. When I say postmodernism, I mean not just its pernicious elements – neo-Marxist identity politics, compelled speech and the assault on truth itself – but also how these elements manifest: cancel culture, climate apocalypticism, critical race theory and the erosion of liberty.

Universities were the foundation of the Enlightenment, bringing the smartest minds together to think on and attempt to answer the most difficult scientific and philosophical questions of the day. The job of these institutions is to preserve the past and then educate the young in order to pass that knowledge along.

The concept of a university, where experts in different fields gather to bounce ideas off each other, has become exploited and poisoned by extremists wanting to push their own agendas. The guardians of our nation’s heritage, from our museums to the British Library and the National Trust, seem to be more interested in trashing our history than preserving it.

Have these once great institutions become so in thrall to the woke mob that they are corrupted beyond repair?

The National Trust is trying to link Winston Churchill to the slave trade, the British Museum is attempting to ‘decolonise’ its collections and even the Conservative party is attempting to regulate speech online with its online safety bill. These once great institutions are now shadows of their former selves.

Part of the issue here is that if we set up public institutions, they tend naturally to become dominated by parasitic bureaucrats who are pushing an agenda. Perhaps merely setting our institutions up so they are publicly funded to such a great degree drastically increases the probability that they will become ideologically dominated.

You may say: “Well public institutions like those were always going to fall to the hands of the woke mob. They’re not beholden to shareholders and they don’t have to make money. But don’t worry – at least the private sector will remain sane!” Alas, the commercial world has been captured as well – partly thanks to the HR departments being given far too much power, all in the name of empathy, wellness and a work life balance. No great company was ever created by Human Resources, but many have been held back by them.

Not far behind the HR departments are the marketing teams and the advertising agencies (I have written previously about how the woke advertising world is driving customers away). You can see just how far these agencies have fallen by watching a four-minute ad break. Cast your mind back to the not-too-distant past – remember the Guinness Surfer Ad (1998) and the Yellow Pages J.R. Hartley (1983)?

These were created by the once great Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO – a legendary agency with creatives who were actually doing creative things. Now look at it. It’s more interested in winning Diversity in Advertising awards and pushing more identity politics on the public.

Not forgetting Wieden+Kennedy – in 2006 it made Honda’s famous Cog advert, one of the greatest ads of all times. Now? It has teamed up with Colin Kaepernick to call America systemically racist.

We could argue the agencies are just doing what the client wants. More likely they are both complicit, egging each other on to be ever more virtuous and moral.

Like governments around the world, major corporations are falling over themselves to issue climate pledges. One recent review of 500 commercial websites by Britain’s Competition and Markets Authority found 40% of environmental claims to be misleading in some way.

The question is, can all these great institutions be saved, or do we rebuild them?

In some sense it must be both. As Kemi Badenoch has shown, we can and should push back. In her position as Equalities Minister, Badenoch made her name by rejecting the woke Left’s race-based educational ideas, and she pushed back against her predecessor Penny Mordaunt’s ludicrous idea that people must be treated as whatever it is they claim to ‘feel’ to be that day.

Zewditu Gebreyohanes has called on National Trust members to save it from wokery, stating: “The only way we can effect change at the top, after all, is by remaining members voting en masse for the Restore Trust resolutions and council candidates.”

However, we must also build anew by creating institutions that are uncorrupted, built on tradition and serve the widening gap in the market.

Stephen Blackwood, along with many other eminent thinkers and academics including Vernon Smith, Heather Mac Donald, Harry Lewis, Ruth Wisse, Roger Kimball and Jordan Peterson, is launching a university in Savana Georgia, dedicated to seeking truth. History Reclaimed is determined to stop history being rewritten and used for political purposes. A Band of Brothers is a charity which aims to support disaffected young men to grow and develop, improving their lives and the communities they live in by pushing back against evil and pernicious terms like ‘toxic masculinity’ and ‘male privilege’.

Even new companies are being born in the fight against woke. In response to Gillette’s now infamous three minutes of man-hate, Jeremy’s Razors has started using the slogan: “Stop giving your money to woke corporations who hate you. Give it to me instead.”

I set up Uncommon Sense to give brands and companies an agency that would get back to selling their products for them, rather than trying to sell ideas and pursue ‘social justice’.

The power of the individual should never be underestimated, so don’t just sit idly by while postmodernism corrupts everything. Reach out to like-minded individuals, help set up institutions, get on the school board or re-join associations to help fight back!

If you run a business and one of your suppliers promises to be carbon neutral, ask how much that will cost you in higher prices. Will that mean your customers have to pay more? Will higher prices stop you investing in staff or new positions?

Money talks; it will be what stops the encroachment, so use it wisely. Support businesses that want the best for you and your children, not companies that hate you.

 Lee Taylor is Managing Director of marketing agency Uncommon Sense.

https://dailysceptic.org/2022/09/24/can-woke-institutions-be-salvaged-or-must-we-build-anew/

 

 

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3 hours ago, Macnamara said:

I would say that the answer now is to AGGRESSIVELY vote with your feet and by 'aggressively' i don't mean by stamping your feet in a loud manner! I mean you have to be really disciplined with yourself to reject and remove your custom from woke groups, companies and institutions.

 

I'm at that stage right now of finding myself out of step with the religion and spiritual forums I belong to ... but it's a difficult landscape to find non-woke alternatives these days. I agree that it's a herculean uphill struggle to reform them from within, and easier to jump ship to something more amenable - if I can find one.   

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