Jump to content

The demonic power of words


Michi713
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/28/2021 at 7:44 AM, Given To Fly said:

prob two of the most used words in the english language are "hello" (hell-o) and "good morning" (good mourning). you're actually greeting someone with a negative connotation by being nice and not noticing it.

 

i'd rather go telly tubby and say eh-oh (which i do lol)

Hello is also hell & low. I never say good morning to anyone anymore, I always say hi = high.

 

Days of the week  = weak

Weekends = weak end or weakened

 

There are so many I could write tons of them. Never say bless to anyone though bless = be less

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Puzzle said:

Hello is also hell & low. I never say good morning to anyone anymore, I always say hi = high.

 

Days of the week  = weak

Weekends = weak end or weakened

 

There are so many I could write tons of them. Never say bless to anyone though bless = be less

Hi, I'd be interested to hear the positive alternatives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Divide and Rule.
 
Compass (dividers) and Square (rulers).
 
1910834372_MerryChristmas.jpg.4cbcbd08d5141a06bb7af4fa5c4243cc.jpg
 
Also, Roman Triumphal Arches - Subtle Symbology or Sublime Social Control...
 
BEWARE THE “CONTRACT OF THE ARCH” – THE “ARK OF THE COVENANT”
 
 
 

Merry Christmas G2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/12/2021 at 10:09 PM, BlueSky said:

Hi, I'd be interested to hear the positive alternatives.

Probably best to just not speak to anyone. Who knows what evils are residing in our words? 

 

From  Merriam-Webster (the folks who've been making dictionaries since 1828):

An older term used for greeting or salutation is hail, which dates back to the Middle Ages but was still in use in Shakespeare’s time; he used it both as a greeting (“Hail to your grace“) and as an acclamation (“Hail, Caesar!”). Interestingly, this word is related to others that originally meant “health,” such as hale, health, and whole. Since hail was presumably sometimes shouted (from a horse, across a river, from a tower), it isn’t surprising that several variants are recorded, including hollo, hallo, and halloa. Another variant of this interjection has subsequently had a long life as a noun and verb: holler.

 

Hello is first recorded in the early 1800s, but was originally used to attract attention or express surprise (“Well, hello! What do we have here?”). But the true breakthrough for this now-common word was when it was employed in the service of brand-new technology: the telephone. Thomas Edison himself claimed to have initiated the use of hello upon receiving a phone call—which required people to address an unseen and unknown person. It was simpler and more efficient than some other greetings used in the early days of the telephone, such as “Do I get you?” and “Are you there?”

 

Hello obviously caught on, and spread along with the telephone. But had the actual inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell, had his way, our greetings might be very different today. For his entire life, he preferred to answer the phone with “Ahoy.”

 

That is why Mr. Burns (from The Simpsons) answers his phone with, "Ahoy", by the way.

 

The origin of the word "hello" was similar to the word "halo". And a "halo" is defined as:

  • A luminous ring or disk of light surrounding the heads or bodies of sacred figures, such as saints, in religious paintings; a nimbus.
  • A ring or disk resembling the halo of a sacred figure.
  • A feeling of glory, reverence, or admiration associated with a person or thing.

Therefore, I would suggest, in contrast to what has been previously posted in this thread, that the word "hello" is a very positive thing to say to another as a form of greeting and salutation.

 

Jordan Maxwell has some interesting videos regarding word origins and meanings, especially with regards to legalese. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, KingKitty said:

Probably best to just not speak to anyone. Who knows what evils are residing in our words? 

 

From  Merriam-Webster (the folks who've been making dictionaries since 1828):

An older term used for greeting or salutation is hail, which dates back to the Middle Ages but was still in use in Shakespeare’s time; he used it both as a greeting (“Hail to your grace“) and as an acclamation (“Hail, Caesar!”). Interestingly, this word is related to others that originally meant “health,” such as hale, health, and whole. Since hail was presumably sometimes shouted (from a horse, across a river, from a tower), it isn’t surprising that several variants are recorded, including hollo, hallo, and halloa. Another variant of this interjection has subsequently had a long life as a noun and verb: holler.

 

Hello is first recorded in the early 1800s, but was originally used to attract attention or express surprise (“Well, hello! What do we have here?”). But the true breakthrough for this now-common word was when it was employed in the service of brand-new technology: the telephone. Thomas Edison himself claimed to have initiated the use of hello upon receiving a phone call—which required people to address an unseen and unknown person. It was simpler and more efficient than some other greetings used in the early days of the telephone, such as “Do I get you?” and “Are you there?”

 

Hello obviously caught on, and spread along with the telephone. But had the actual inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell, had his way, our greetings might be very different today. For his entire life, he preferred to answer the phone with “Ahoy.”

 

That is why Mr. Burns (from The Simpsons) answers his phone with, "Ahoy", by the way.

 

The origin of the word "hello" was similar to the word "halo". And a "halo" is defined as:

  • A luminous ring or disk of light surrounding the heads or bodies of sacred figures, such as saints, in religious paintings; a nimbus.
  • A ring or disk resembling the halo of a sacred figure.
  • A feeling of glory, reverence, or admiration associated with a person or thing.

Therefore, I would suggest, in contrast to what has been previously posted in this thread, that the word "hello" is a very positive thing to say to another as a form of greeting and salutation.

 

Jordan Maxwell has some interesting videos regarding word origins and meanings, especially with regards to legalese. 

Thanks KingKitty, I should have done some research myself, I was being lazy, maybe I was a cat in a former life. Although they would probably call it meditating, they are masters at it. 🐱 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

‘V for Victory’ – Not What You Think It Means!

We were misled during World War 2.

We are being misled now.

 

https://pubastrology.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/v-for-victory-v1.pdf

https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzzc5H

 

 

V00.JPG.6a256a9f3554fad05d5eeb83f59e609c.JPG

 

https://pubastrology.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/v-for-victory-v1.pdf

https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzzc5H

 

 

V41.JPG

V01.JPG

Edited by Prince Arthur
Link to comment
Share on other sites

‘V for Victory’ – Not What You Think It Means!

We were misled during World War 2.

We are being misled now.

 

https://pubastrology.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/v-for-victory-v1.pdf

 

https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzzc5H

 

V Campaigns used on all sides for World War 2?

 

Slide17.JPG.253b6c957090aa1d48c286772f4e31bb.JPG

 

V Campaigns used on all sides for World War 2.

 

'Germany Wins On All Fronts'....

 

Slide11.JPG.0fce63c7c1ab0d0d1836a56969d305b0.JPG

 

V Campaigns used on all sides for World War 2.

 

French Resistance adopting the 'V for Victory' Campaign with Charles de Gaulle throwing some shapes.

 

Slide8.JPG.71002319a4a5072b5e9b343f2eb11c61.JPG

 

V Campaigns used on all sides for World War 2.

 

Slide3.JPG.d5c4371f85e1b5b2c32582df24374e33.JPG

 

 

‘V for Victory’ – Not What You Think It Means!

We were misled during World War 2.

We are being misled now.

 

https://pubastrology.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/v-for-victory-v1.pdf

 

https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzzc5H

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...