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Saw them in field today under a hawthorn tree, put a conker next to them for scale.

A mate used to pick them years ago, he showed me them but it was 30 years ago..I'm sure they were much smaller.?

Anyway, just out of interest really, there were quite a few there.

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Wild shrooms will have dark brown or black gills, black or dark purple spore prints, and the stems will bruise purple/blue when pinched or after they’ve been laid out for awhile.  Anything else I would refrain.  

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10 hours ago, shadowmoon said:

Saw them in field today under a hawthorn tree, put a conker next to them for scale.

A mate used to pick them years ago, he showed me them but it was 30 years ago..I'm sure they were much smaller.?

Anyway, just out of interest really, there were quite a few there.

 

Magick mushrooms , the type often found growing in wales ??

 

No they ain't ... you are correct , they're too big 

 

As Michi has said all psilocybin mushrooms exhibit a "bluing effect" , if the white flesh is rubbed you will see some blue 

 

Here's the ones you are looking for ..

 white-male-hand-holding-a-collection-of-

Edited by oz93666
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12 hours ago, Michi713 said:

Wild shrooms will have dark brown or black gills, black or dark purple spore prints, and the stems will bruise purple/blue when pinched or after they’ve been laid out for awhile.  Anything else I would refrain.  

 

 

They have dark brown gills, spore print is black, the caps dry offwhite, they have the nipply bit on top.. all the right signs (from doing some looking up).. just the size..

 

There used to be a field back in 1990 era, where I would pick them but its long been turned into a human hutch housing estate. These days I  just like to id rather than eat them.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Sunny_Leslie said:

Something tells me that these mushrooms are poisonous. I would not touch mushrooms, the edibility of which is not sure.

 

Quite a few of them had been nibbled.. if they are magic shrooms there are some tripping mice in that field.! 🤣

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19 minutes ago, Sunny_Leslie said:

Something tells me that these mushrooms are poisonous. I would not touch mushrooms, the edibility of which is not sure.

 

They're not poisonous. I know because I've eaten them thinking they were madgies.

 

 

 

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Just now, Truthspoon said:

 

They're not poisonous. I know because I've eaten them thinking they were madgies.

 

 

You may not drop dead on the spot , but no way of knowing if it's done something to liver or kidneys causing a problem years later ... 

 

Mushies are not things to play with 

 

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23 minutes ago, oz93666 said:

 

You may not drop dead on the spot , but no way of knowing if it's done something to liver or kidneys causing a problem years later ... 

 

Mushies are not things to play with 

 

 

I know all about mushrooms. I used to live in the middle of a forest in France.

 

Thanks for the patronising advice anyway.

 

Those mushrooms in the picture post are totally harmless. 

 

It's not even debatable. 

 

There are far more edible mushrooms than poisonous ones in fact.

 

Just that most mushrooms aren't particularly worth eating. Often because they're just soggy or just have no texture.

 

You don't need to be afraid of mushrooms..... the poisonous ones usually look weird..... either they're all white, or green, or have a red cap or a red stem...or they may bruise yellow, or bruise red, there's usually tell tale signs with poisonous mushrooms.

 

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Truthspoon said:

 

I know all about mushrooms. I used to live in the middle of a forest in France.

 

Thanks for the patronising advice anyway.

 

Those mushrooms in the picture post are totally harmless. 

 

It's not even debatable. 

 

There are far more edible mushrooms than poisonous ones in fact.

 

Just that most mushrooms aren't particularly worth eating. Often because they're just soggy or just have no texture.

 

You don't need to be afraid of mushrooms..... the poisonous ones usually look weird..... either they're all white, or green, or have a red cap or a red stem...or they may bruise yellow, or bruise red, there's usually tell tale signs with poisonous mushrooms.

 

 

 

 

 

Us Brits have a reticence about fungi that europeans don't.

I find looking at them fascinating but a lot of the time people here stamp them down or kick them over.

After looking around there are very few species in England that resemble magic mushrooms if you know what you are looking for, I wish my old hippy mate from 30 years ago was still about for advice as hands on I.d. wins out.

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17 minutes ago, shadowmoon said:

 

Us Brits have a reticence about fungi that europeans don't.

I find looking at them fascinating but a lot of the time people here stamp them down or kick them over.

After looking around there are very few species in England that resemble magic mushrooms if you know what you are looking for, I wish my old hippy mate from 30 years ago was still about for advice as hands on I.d. wins out.

 

If anyone's in or near London a great place to buy some weird edible mushrooms is Borough Market...... 

 

The best ones are the morels, they're fresh in mid spring but you can buy them dried and they're just as good once you rehydrate them.

 

Probably the tastiest mushroom you can get..... nutty with a firm texture.

 

 

61b-fEfEqKL._AC_SY679_.jpg

 

Edited by Truthspoon
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Just now, Truthspoon said:

 

If anyone's in or near London a great place to buy some weird edible mushrooms is Borough Market...... 

 

The best ones are the morels, they're fresh in mid spring but you can buy them dried and they're just as good once you rehydrate them.

 

 

 

 

Saw some giant puffballs in the fields last autumn & at my old workplace we had earth stars.. which look so weird !

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Just now, shadowmoon said:

 

Saw some giant puffballs in the fields last autumn & at my old workplace we had earth stars.. which look so weird !

 

They're cracking things sliced and fried in butter...... but once they get old they become full of dusty spores and they're no good.

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6 hours ago, Truthspoon said:

 

They're cracking things sliced and fried in butter...... but once they get old they become full of dusty spores and they're no good.

 

I'll have to have a look, I remember roughly where they were then.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I love mushrooms and fungi! And I am not ashamed to say that, for some inexplicable reason which escapes me, I become very excited when I spot a specimen. The most fascinating mushrooms/fungi, to me, include the stinkhorn, porcelain fungus, earthstar, puffballs, ink-caps, the boletus family and parasols.

 

In the video below Paul Stamets, Mycologist and Entrepreneur, is interviewed about a new documentary, which is about to be released, called 'Fantastic Fungi'. Fungi, he says, could be one of the solutions for rebuilding our damaged ecosystems. The spores of mushrooms are nuclei for rain droplets which can aid eco-restoration, the expansion of soil and micro climate change.

 

There are also huge health benefits from psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, which has great psycho-therapeutic effects and is beneficial in fighting anxiety and depression. It is said to help rebuild neurons and encourage creativity. Psilocybin helps create mental plasticity which aids with breaking out of rigid and restrictive mental patterns and helps to glimpse the larger picture, feel more connected and see things in a new way.

 

 

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On 10/17/2020 at 10:13 PM, Mitochondrial Eve said:

I love mushrooms and fungi! And I am not ashamed to say that, for some inexplicable reason which escapes me, I become very excited when I spot a specimen. The most fascinating mushrooms/fungi, to me, include the stinkhorn, porcelain fungus, earthstar, puffballs, ink-caps, the boletus family and parasols.

 

In the video below Paul Stamets, Mycologist and Entrepreneur, is interviewed about a new documentary, which is about to be released, called 'Fantastic Fungi'. Fungi, he says, could be one of the solutions for rebuilding our damaged ecosystems. The spores of mushrooms are nuclei for rain droplets which can aid eco-restoration, the expansion of soil and micro climate change.

 

There are also huge health benefits from psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, which has great psycho-therapeutic effects and is beneficial in fighting anxiety and depression. It is said to help rebuild neurons and encourage creativity. Psilocybin helps create mental plasticity which aids with breaking out of rigid and restrictive mental patterns and helps to glimpse the larger picture, feel more connected and see things in a new way.

 

 

Paul Stamets' advice cured me of superficial frostbite neuropathy in both my hands! 

Lions Mane along with high doses of Niacin has been amazing for me :) 

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