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Shining-one

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Posts posted by Shining-one

  1. Just now, SimonTV said:

     

    The great threat is our bureaucracy which we hold up as some great intellectual force is so nothing more than a pathetic easily manipulated bunch of corrupt losers. 

    Thing is, my friends are still my friends. I know how they think is a short-term mentality. I would't let it get between friendship. Many of my friends are hard workers or at one time were living in poor areas. Their job is their world. They have kids too. I'm still very much their friend regardless and we carry on as normal. I recall very well when Muhammad Ali refused induction to Vietnam, all his friends were urging him to step forward when the time came. He didn't. Ali dedicated his later book to all who make a stand. 

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  2. I'm beginning to feel a solitary dissident. All the people I see daily who boasted, "I won't have the vaccine" are toppling like skittles in a row. An old friend told me today, well, maybe she will have the vaccine (she works in a shop). She then asked me what I thought and I replied it's none of my business and a personal decision. I was disappointed though but naturally wouldn't interfere. At that point a young woman approached as she'd heard the exchange of conversation. She blurted out her friend had had the vaccine a and developed a growth (on her arm I think). The conversation then carried on between the two of them. Even then my friend, the shop worker, was still saying, "Well, I just don't know!". For me this is a problem. All my friends are giving in under pressure as all are far more socially programmed. They can't escape this basic idea that they must follow the rules and avoid the risk of being an outcast. I have no answer to that problem. I just think there comes a time when principle has to be defended. Giving in to the idea the State literally owns your body could prove to exact a terrible toll on the freedoms of future generations. It poses risks to our ability to fight off bacteria and newly evolved viruses. It's morally unacceptable to be discriminated against using insignia. For me it's an insult to the millions who died fighting fascists in WW2. I repeat to all who know me - I will not accept any vaccine under coercion. 

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  3. Surprised nobody has figured out yet how to capitalise on masks. Great for protests don't you think? Nobody knows who you are. Years ago burkhas were causing alarm just for that reason.
    I had to laugh. My local store had a sign requesting younger shoppers to remove masks when buying alcohol. What then is the use of that? If I were that age I'd be tempted to reply I daren't remove the mask and risk death over a bottle of wine. Lay the exact cash down and adios.

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  4. How weird is that! I Looked up San Pedro and it's a cactus. A hallucegenic one at that. I recently started to grow cactus but just ones sold at local stores.
    More people agreeing with me lately on the street. Those who 2 months ago still felt the virus was a major threat are now taking a 180 degree turn. The saying is true: You can fool all of the people "some" of the time. I was also informed today of a punch-up at the local chippy over someone not wearing a mask. More people are not wearing them and arguments arise.

  5. I admit for me it's easier. Most of my life I was at odds with the system and not subject to control. More of a social drop-out but I always found ways to survive. I even camped in the peaks around Spain and gave English classes to get a bit of money. Most people will find it very hard to choose between work and a forced vaccine. I will say this though: To give in to a bully just emboldens the bully. It postpones more attacks on your liberty and freedom of choice. The vaccine doesn't protect others which is admitted officially. So why should we take the risk if we feel we aren't personally at risk? The more people use threats I'm afraid the more I'm prepared to go in the opposite way. Those who feel the same way I advise to prepare a plan, be it a mobile home or some alternative.

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  6. Worth while perhaps to look at the Poundland court case. Can't recall the name of the girl and her lawyer. They took the UK Government to the European Court Of Human rights over the issue of unpaid forcef labour (for benefits) Don't want to get long-winded but Duncan Smith tried to win this case by retroactively changing the law. This after two defeats in the EU Court. My point? I tend to be very cynical over the idea the law is a reliable mechanism to protect us. Politicians aren't to be trusted. Sure, they are not going to openly state you must in most cases have the vaccine. They will instead allow or encourage employers to dismiss employees who aren't vaccinated. All sorts of basic movements may be restricted. My own reaction to this will be self-sufficiency as far as it can be accomplished. No Government will ever dictate what pharmaceuticals I risk using. Even more so when it doesn't protect others whether you have it or not.

  7. Time to think about practicalities. Straight facts. The vaccination is said to be voluntary. This is a straight lie and untrue. Reality is those of us who don't vaccinate will be held to ransom by difficulties in employment or access to public facilities and restrictions on travel. To be honest that has the opposite effect as now I'm even more geared up to reject the idea of vaccine. The real issue for me is to be self sufficient and of course abandonment of trust in banks. I just have a strong feeling of not being allowed into any bank without my star of David insignia. As in 1939 Poland.

  8. FLASH: I've been putting off hard decisions but the question to be addressed is is our money safe? I have no wish to draw all my savings out of the bank as it's not the safest measure. However, I find now that vaccine passports will soon prevent us entering public buildings to conduct our business. This is being discussed. As I'm flatly refusing any vaccine I can no longer shrug off the impact of all this virus hysteria. Just not feeling savings are safe at this time. I think it's getting so out of control it would be foolish to assume we will be free to function as normal. Last time I did go to my bank I had a hard job getting through the door as it was supervised.

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  9. 21 hours ago, Avoiceinthecrowd said:

    In all fairness there was an underlying current regarding those infected. They were viewed as lepers. People kept their distance and burned bridges. Even those uninfected that were part of the gay culture were approached cautiously. I have personally witnessed people pulling their hand away as a gay corporate type approached to shake hands. The press played around with it enough to fuel the flames but besides that it was like people pretended they were unaware until in close proximity to the danger.

    This is true although back then there was no major political interference. Straight advice given on TV but no real hysteria. That particular generation was a lot tougher whereas today hypochondria seems to be everywhere. All my friends (mostly female) keep advising me to avoid germs and so on.

  10. Could very well come to pass billions of people could die of the common cold. The old saying of those the gods seek to destroy, first drive mad. Funny thing is so many appointed experts continue to insist social distancing doesn't damage the immune system. Yet, in all history no species has ever attempted to isolate from all bacteria. It's an incredibly foolish step to take. Makes homo sapiens probably the dumbest species on the planet. Who knows, the common could could evolve to be quite devastating.

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  11. Found an ally yesterday. She works in a shop and told me she would refuse a vaccine. I asked what she would do if her job depended upon it and she says she'd have to finish. Shrugged it off.
    I keep thinking how much worse AIDS was and how calm people were. I think John Inman died of it and Kendo Nagasaki's manager. AIDS really was a killer but there was no hysteria at the time. This virus is a risk to people with serious comorbid health issues and myself I have no sense of alarm.

  12. 23 minutes ago, Liberty said:

    This is what the public don’t understand. They can say no. Like all those lorry drivers being made to have a test before leaving the UK. It was illegal. 

    My philosophy is you can't reason with a drunk. And you can't reason with hysteria. To allow a test means a very probable "you tested positive" verdict. Then you have an illness that puts others at risk but the kicker is you were never ill to begin with. Reminds me of the Hopkins witch test. 

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  13. Been reading today about house calls in main cities, to test residents. My question is surely even existing law (as it stands), can't legalise that kind of policy? I mean, it boils down to a personal medical intervention being taken for granted. I'm afraid in those circumstances I'd want to see some written, legal authorisation and possibly a legal representative present. These tests tend to diagnose quite healthy people as a carrier and can result in serious inconvenience. And even on those terms I'd still not agree to random testing.

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  14. 2 hours ago, Sexpistol50 said:

    I think they can only take you off their registry if your abusive or have moved out the area. I was offered the flu vaccine and had repeated text messages I never replied and I was never taken off their practice registry. 

    I haven't had any flu vaccine and rarely get colds. If I do, it's more of a run-down couple of days. I was messaged about the flu jab last week as a presumable first step to impose the other. I decided just not to respond. No need to spell it out. There is no way I would consent to proceedures that I believe weakens immunity in the long term. As a 10 year old I recall kicking a dentist in the stomach when they still had gas and not cocaine. Of course, I'm a fair bit stronger now than back then.

  15. Of course, it might pay to create a global support network for dissidents. This is the way many organisations survived. Wealthy donors who believe in freedom of choice and liberty. One tycoon is sueing Facebook for censoring anti-vax opinion.

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  16. Referring to canal boats. If you run on electric motor and solar power, waterways licence is much cheaper. It can be cheaper to live than housing but it helps to be self-reliant. I have lived with very little money for years and survived recycling and repairing stuff thrown away. The way things are going I'm more persuaded there's never been a better time to drop out. I mean, in the great depression in New York, a lot of jobless people built makeshift homes and survived. The State in reality has no monopoly on our survival. What I will say is I won't be vaccinated no matter what employment or benefits are removed. The more the threat, the more determination to take the opposite path.

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  17. Millenium Bug? No, not as much panic as today but the pattern was the same.

    "For its January 18, 1999 issue, Time magazine rang in the year with the words “The End of the World!?!” on its cover. Other publications would issue “Y2K Checklists,” which advised people to have medicine, a few day’s cash and up-to-date paper records of all financial transactions. Some families even went as far as setting up emergency bunkers in their basements to ride out the feared impending apocalypse."

    The sign below was from 1999. 

    See the similarity?

    0_MPr_HMB_170119bug_03.jpg

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  18. "A 35-year-old woman loses the use of her legs, suddenly becoming paralysed from the waist down. In another case, a woman feels an overwhelming compulsion to close her eyes, until eventually she cannot open them at all. After numerous tests, nothing physically wrong was found with these patients, so what caused their symptoms?

    Conditions like these used to be diagnosed as hysteria. In fact, they would fit neatly into the pages of Sigmund Freud and Josef Breuer’s Studies On Hysteria, written over a century ago.

    You might think our understanding has advanced since Freud, or, rather more fashionably, that Freud was just wrong. But this isn’t the case.

    It was Freud who proposed that the memory of trauma which the patient fails to confront, because it will cause them too much mental anguish, can be “converted” into physical symptoms. What is more surprising is that cases like this are typical of those routinely seen by neurologists today."

     

  19. I wonder what happened to psychology and neurology as a science? Very few psychologists are discussing it. I think now that huge percentages of people are showing clear signs of hysteria and mass delusion. This is clear enough by the way so many step back away from you and draw their arm over their mouth. What's not understood by politicians is hysteria not only causes delusion with physical symptoms but even temporary blindness has been brought about by shock, or deep seated anxiety. This has happened before in history. A great deal of NHS staff, police and politicians genuinely believe there's a major threat. The giveaway is they don't act rationally or calmly. In my opinion, what so many people fear is facing up to life and accepting reality, with its constant risk of failure, death or loss. So, they break down in a similar way to psychotic disorder, where paranoia and stereotypical repetition often hospitalises the patient. Something is conjured up to embody the fear. A deadly virus. A millenium bug. Witches. Russians who orchestrate election results. 

    Let's put it this way. During extreme nervousness or phobia your hands sweat and you rush back and forth to the toilet. To stop the symptoms you can try and suppress the physical symptoms by taking a diahorrea pill. Or, much easier is to address the anxiety that causes the problem. 

    Even if we take the view the virus is real and that the surrounding hysteria is just a reaction to a severe threat, why don't those presumably in authority urge people to keep calm? When did hysteria and negativity ever solve a crisis?

    I am not sure how much of the virus people fear so much has a purely bological cause. Initially it was thought to pose a risk to those who had serious comorbid health issues. Now, over time, this has been inflated to "deadly". You could get run over by a bus and they'd now call it Covid related. 

    Einstein once stated knowledge has a limit but stupidity seeingly has none. 

     

     

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  20. In real time, any mention of this theme to me is akin to waving a red flag at a bull. Today I delivered a blistering lecture on the spur of the moment about parallels. Pointing out how many people suffered starvation in WW2 and endured concentration camps, invasion, occupation and partisan warfare. And yet, on a daily basis we hear about this supposed threat from bacteria. No comparison to 20 million deaths in WW2 really. I've no idea why the population has become so soft and feeble-minded. I mean, AIDS killed a surprising number of people and genuinely posed a threat to life. The other day I chanced upon the fact AIDS killed Kendo Nagasaki's manager as well as Roddy Mcdowel. Yet there was no mass hysteria or suggestion we should all wear one-piece condom outfits. A much tougher generation I guess.

  21. Likewise getting weird reactions discussing this with people I know. I'm still a minority. Most of my friends just think they're part of a sensible effort to halt a deadly virus. Mostly this is the women. I never get bogged down in actual arguments. My theory is they work long hours, switch on the news and just take it all at face value. Many people don't have the time to question and just assume so many people can't be wrong. As to some I know I who swear they won't have a vaccine, I remain skeptical. A good many will no doubt give in under pressure so I expect to be a minority. I sometimes explain that not catching colds as people have for centuries should eventually make the common cold far more potent. Yet it seems neither the reason or will to challenge is present. Many are nice people but have the backbones of a proverbial jelly fish.

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  22. Once in a while, Putin hits the nail on the head. I think a lot of the tales you hear of poisonings and plots is the same kind of hysteria that's behind the virus. Most people don't realise Putin inherited a country in breakdown and, more to the point, was surrounded by relatively hostile NATO states. This ran contrary to what Gorbachev was promised verbally when the Berlin Wall fell. I noticed for many months there has been hysterical paranoia over Russia and the idea it employs 24 hour hackers and propaganda agents. Most of it - fantasy. 

     

    "British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson discussed dealing with Moscow in an 18-minute phone call with Russian pranksters impersonating the prime minister of Armenia in a recording posted online Thursday and confirmed by the foreign ministry as genuine.

    During the hoax, which purportedly occurred last week, Johnson congratulates the caller -- whom he thinks is new Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan -- before promptly turning to Britain's frayed relations with Russia.

    "We have to stand firm against them though I appreciate that your geography dictates a balancing act," Johnson said, offering "support and encouragement" and an invitation to visit the UK. "

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  23. Vladimir Putin addressed the World Economic Forum on Jan. 27.

    "Russian President Vladimir Putin said the world risks sliding into an “all against all” conflict amid tensions caused by the Covid-19 pandemic and growing economic inequality.

    Addressing the World Economic Forum on Wednesday for the first time in 12 years, Putin drew parallels with the 1930s when he said a failure to resolve international problems sparked World War II.

    “Today, such a global hot conflict is, I hope, in principle impossible,” Putin said in his online speech to The Davos Agenda. “But, I repeat, the situation can develop unpredictably and uncontrollably.”

  24. 4 hours ago, Ergo Storm said:

     

    Or hide your assets or deny you have assets.  As a practical matter, most people in this situation avoid payment by taking advantage of slowness/inertia in the system.  Appeal everything and complain, etc.  If you can't overturn it, avoid the bailiff/enforcer as much as possible.  When he catches up with you, claim poverty.  Delay returning proof of means forms, etc.  When it gets to court, say you'll pay £1.00 a month - which in effect amounts to non-payment.  Then don't pay.  Then say you forgot, etc.  

     

    Ultimately, I believe those of us who disagree with all this will have to live in parallel societies.

    This now seems unavoidable. Maybe the irony of it is the current extremism should persuade many of us not to bank savings. In the past, it could sometimes work against you but the risk was minimal. Now, to my mind, banking your capital at the moment carries real risks. I do know gold has risen as so many people are buying sovereigns. As to internet banking, say no more. I wouldn't touch it personally. 

    if-you-want-can-show-you-how-to-make-a-10262694.png

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