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A_Grand_Tale_Of_Horror

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Everything posted by A_Grand_Tale_Of_Horror

  1. Considering the move to Linux myself, I went mint For a while but found less performance in games. I might try pop.
  2. I've come across secret Ickeers through time. My old boss was one (actually swung me onto icke) and he was a mega capitalist business guy, loves the theory about reptilians and ancient civilizations, my current "not" boss but one job higher than me who I do work for actually piped up with a lot to say when I spoke about David the other day, I was completely shocked as he seems the type to spend his days off doing the stock market and reading the Guardian. Robbie always seemed a decent fellow, grew up with him on radio and telly, not my kind of stuff mind you but nice to see good people still around.
  3. https://getpocket.com/explore/item/conspiracy-theorists-have-a-fundamental-cognitive-problem-say-scientists?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB
  4. Found this; (not my personal stand point or opinion, just thought it would spark debate) Conspiracy Theorists Have a Fundamental Cognitive Problem, Say Scientists And it can affect all of us. The world’s a scary, unpredictable place, and that makes your brain mad. As a predictive organ, the brain is on the constant lookout for patterns that both explain the world and help you thrive in it. That ability helps humans make sense of the world. For example, you probably understand by now that if you see red, that means that you should be on the lookout for danger. But as scientists report in a 2017 paper published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, sometimes people sense danger even when there is no pattern to recognize — and so their brains create their own. This phenomenon, called illusory pattern perception, they write, is what drives people who believe in conspiracy theories, like climate change deniers, 9/11 truthers, and “Pizzagate” believers. The study is especially timely; recent polls suggest that nearly 50 percent of ordinary, non-pathological Americans believe in at least one conspiracy theory. Illusory pattern perception — the act of seeking patterns that aren’t there — has been linked to belief in conspiracy theories before, but that assumption has never really been supported with empirical evidence. The British and Dutch scientists behind the new study are some of the first to show that this explanation is, in fact, correct. The researchers came to this conclusion after conducting five studies on 264 Americans who focused on the relationship between irrational beliefs and illusory pattern perception. Initial studies revealed that the compulsion to find patterns in an observable situation was in fact correlated with irrational beliefs: People who saw patterns in random coin tosses and chaotic, abstract paintings were more likely to believe in conspiratorial and supernatural theories. The study showed how susceptible people can be to external influences, too. Reading about paranormal or conspiracy beliefs, the researchers report, caused a “slight increase in the perception of patterns in coin tosses, paintings and life,” and reading about one conspiracy theory made people more likely to believe in another one. “Following a manipulation of belief in one conspiracy theory people saw events in the world as more strongly casually connected, which in turn predicted unrelated irrational beliefs,” write the authors. The researchers suggest that irrational beliefs are born from pattern perception because of the “automatic tendency to make sense of the world by identifying meaningful relationships between stimuli.” But distortions can happen, and the brain can connect dots that are actually nonexistent. People are bad at judging what’s random and believe that, often times, patterns are actually coincidences, which leads to irrational connections between unrelated stimuli. For example, just because societal power is dominated by the rich does not mean those rich people are Illuminati Satanists, though that is a thing that many people believe. Fortunately, other scientists have found a way to block the pervasiveness of illusory pattern perception: critical thinking. In a previous interview, North Carolina State University psychology professor Anne McLaughlin told Inverse that critical thinking is something that can be taught, and if people are trained in the right way, pseudoscience and false conspiracies can be combated with logic and reasoning. The brain may try to make false connections, but that doesn’t mean you have to believe it. Thoughts?
  5. We seem to be a pretty smart group here, open minds (a trait of intelligence) and we discuss mostly respectfully different way points of view and are happy to be debated. I feel in society that IQ is ranked too highly, don't get me wrong we all benefit from the smartest of the smart, because those who excel bring us all with them, but I feel that IQ has been hijacked in a way that the ideas of those average people are not valid because a high IQ person has a better idea. Iq is not predictor of personality, or even the ability to be a good human being, there are plenty of horribly smart people, I've met a few in my line of work. I know I as a person am not stupid, I do complicated work that changes vastly daily, but I am scared to take an IQ test and do poorly, and then feel stigmatized for the rest of my life. I feel I've fought an up hill battle to get to where I am, and yes I might be in a job where I am hanging on with nails to something that I am only just able to function in, but I feel that's a testament to tenacity. How do you all feel about IQ and it's role in society?
  6. I hear you're a racist now father https://www.dailymotion.com/video/xehdtq
  7. Just realised south Park is on Netflix and is a billion times more offensive that little Britain. Weird
  8. Please don't host these things on social media. I don't have any accounts for any of them. I can't help if I can't access it
  9. "If you don't be quiet I'll have you taken off the marmalade jars" That has me cringing and laughing in equal amounts.
  10. Dug through my dusty DVDs and I am pleased to report I have both the first and second season of little britain on Dvd, phew.
  11. But I'm a lady, regarder nous les things, don't forget to sit down when you piss.
  12. I hope come fly with me gets left alone. I love that it's great. ( just checked and it's gone!! Ffs!)
  13. https://www.lawenforcementtoday.com/police-brutality-race-numbers/ Have a look at this. No opinion, just figures.
  14. Unencrypted link, all data transmitted without protection from eavesdropping. Install an antivirus that will create an https session for you.
  15. Video not loading. Can you post the URL please?
  16. Signatures :) custom forum skins (dark,light mode etc)
  17. I wish people wouldn't put dramatic music in the background on informational videos. Very distracting.
  18. I'd love to hear more about long lasting foods and about how long water stays drinkable for, how to make old stagnant wanted drinkable and other purification methods. Starting a fire with a magnifying glass etc.
  19. My biological, mental and stage age are so drastically different I span generations like time spans space. Confusing ?
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