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Campion

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Everything posted by Campion

  1. The outward explanation is that politicians take a short-term view of debt because paying it back will be someone else's problem, and in any case western govts have a good credit rating with the banks so don't have a problem building up eye-watering levels of debt. Then if you have inflation higher than the interest rate of the debt it effectively reduces the debt (rather like when you have house prices increasing faster than the interest on your mortgage). It also brings in more tax. So, heavily indebted govts like high inflation; it's seen as part of the economic cycle of boom and bust. An inner explanation is that the direction of travel is to use the debt levels, inflation and interest rates to transfer wealth from the middle classes to the banks and large corporations such as oil companies.
  2. Agreed. It's there in the language, just look at how the word "community" is used nowadays. When I was a child, the community was simply the people who happened to live in my local neighbourhood, we didn't think of it being fragmented. But now, every aspect of life has it's own "community", based on race, religion, sexual preference, whatever identity you want. Now we're drip fed with the notion of compartmentalised communities, creating tensions to divert attention away from (which is the essence of magic) the hidden hand re-educating us.
  3. Seaside shooting game has been removed after mum complained it was racist "A seaside 'cowboys and Indians' shooting game has been removed from an arcade after a mum complained it was racist. [E] wrote to bosses at the Grand Pier at Weston-super-Mare in Somerset following a family visit. She spotted the game which featured a saloon with a cowboy on the backdrop, and a gun for shooting moving Native American figures while the player sat on a horse. The adult social care worker from Oxford wrote to pier bosses and told them she thought it was "extremely racist" and "outdated". Emails appear to show bosses replying to say it was a "legacy piece" - and then later saying that nobody else had complained, and it was up to parents to police use. However, when approached for comment earlier this week, a spokesperson said the game had been removed. [E] said: "It's clearly racist. It's absolutely shocking. "Mum and I both just had our mouths open when we first saw it - we were in absolute shock. "The figures of indigenous Americans were in full-on headdresses and there are little 'cowboys' everywhere. "I can't believe the managers have no idea about cultural appropriation." https://www.msn.com/en-gb/entertainment/news/seaside-shooting-game-has-been-removed-after-mum-complained-it-was-racist/vi-AAZWR5M It feels like our country has become one of those Soviet style re-education camps. One person uses the magic R word and a game enjoyed by thousands of kids over many years is 'cancelled', and Cowboys and Indians is now called cultural appropriation, with surprise and shock that the managers didn't self-censor it.
  4. I like your vision, but in my home town the new housing being built is blocks of flats (sorry, apartments for all those newcomers) and "townhouses" with tiny gardens and those which have garages are too small to even fit a car in! However for people with more space it's a great idea. What you're describing is us making an effort to rebuild local communities and unplugging from the spider's web of the global corporates. Thinking about the independence issue, I'm mostly concerned about the future of Northern Ireland if the Union dissolves, but that's a bit off-topic. So too is English independence, even tho as a Englishman my country has been a victim of occupation by unionist imperialism for longer. I've heard the claim that Scotland is in effect bribed into voting to remain in the UK via the Barnett formula. And if Scotland were to stay out of the EU, that would imply a need for trade and other cultural agreements with the rest of the British Isles. So I'm toying with the idea that rather than simply leaving the union, full sovereignty is transferred to the 4 nations, and the union is downgraded to a member's club for things like trade, defence, visas and student exchanges. Like what we wanted when we joined the common market in the 70s. A bit like a congregational rather than an episcopal church.
  5. And it's occurred to me that there's two sides to this plan, because the hidden hand needs to have large numbers of people desperate to leave poor countries in places like Africa, the Middle East and South America. So they need to stir up division, discontent, civil wars, corruption and organised crime on a huge scale: naturally us westerners get blamed for that too and gas lighted with white guilt for (the cult's) imperial history. Why do Africans for example find it so hard to create stable and prosperous countries which their citizens want to live in, rather than to leave for the supposed utopias of Europe and North America? A lot of manipulation going on there too I think.
  6. And increasingly the woke agenda gets implemented almost automatically, without much debate. They're pushing on an open door in academia these days because the basic premise is accepted, that what matters is what you believe, not what the physical evidence shows. It's gaslighting on an epic scale.
  7. The king makers operate in secret behind the scenes, so when they've finished with one front like the white British establishment, they'll need to find another one, probably that's already waiting in the wings to take over. Like the CCP for example. So in case anyone is looking forward to the demise of the British crown, watch out because it's not over yet. Different puppets, same puppet master.
  8. Thanks :) It's amazing how the establishment can push an idea for decades, and get away with it, while all the time the science behind it is flaky, to say the least. How come they only just noticed it now? I suspect that a lot of so-called science is based on conformity and group-think. I took an ssri once when I had depression, and it seemed to help, perhaps I was just lucky. An aside, but by coincidence I was surprised the other day when I was researching some garden flowers I like called Lampranthus to discover it contains a naturally occurring ssri called mesembrenol. Perhaps I'll look further into herbal treatments if I get depressed again, lord knows there's enough cause for it these days. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lampranthus https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesembrenone
  9. I can relate with this, tho I wasn't brought up in a fundamentalist religion, but in my country youth rebellion was a normal and expected part of life in the 2nd half of the 20th C, like a rite of passage almost. Questioning traditional religion was part of that, but now the rebellious instinct seems to have been subverted by the political left to support their "causes". Leftism has become the new conformity in reality, but with a mask of rebellion to make it attractive to the youth with a veneer of radicalism. I'd say we need to revive that spirit of true rebellion and free thinking.
  10. It's my summertime hobby, running round the house with the fly swatter Also at this time of year I get silverfish running around on the floor; tricky little blighters, they run fast under the skirting boards before I can step on them.
  11. Well what's it got to do with us, if they're worried about population they should go to Africa. Our fertility is already crashing, we need to increase it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sovereign_states_and_dependencies_by_total_fertility_rate
  12. This is my main beef with the current heavy marketing of electric cars, that they take so long to charge up and have a limited range even when you do. I don't have a possibility of charging at home without trailing a cable across the road, or having a mass construction of kerbside chargers. So hydrogen cars seem a much superior option, if we are to buy into the whole carbon emission reduction narrative (which I don't but the govt does, and increasingly the corporations). The fact that hydrogen isn't being promoted for private drivers speaks volumes about the strategy behind all this. Also in the news this week was the agreement with French company EDF to build a new reactor at Sizewell B. After all, with the extra demand from electric cars we'll need more power stations, and what's the point having electric cars if the electricity is generated by fossil fuels?
  13. Interesting. Do you have a reference for this, I'd like to read more about it.
  14. That so-called "privatisation" in the 1980s turns out to be a hoax. Buses and trains dependent on taxpayers' subsidy are hardly private businesses: the ownership may be private but the income needs propping up from the public purse.
  15. that sense of connection is important, belonging somewhere and having a pride in your traditions. I've moved round the country several times in my life, so it needn't take long if you're willing and familiar with the general culture. But the pop culture which saturates the western world has no interest in such things; too late do young people discover that the corporate 'coolness' is shallow and lacking in a meaning for their lives, and so we have increasing mental illness, drug taking and suicide. With all the immigration and Americanisation of our culture, it'll probably take several hundred years to rebuild. I was pleased to discover that one of the main roads in my local village* was a Roman road and possibly going further back. The only archaeological finds I've made are bits of clay pipes and pottery in the garden, but that still gives me pleasure at having that little connection with the previous residents here. * I say 'village' but it's been swallowed up into a 'neighbourhood' by the local town becoming a city. It's kind of like globalisation at a micro level, but I still call us a village; it's one way of resisting the onslaught.
  16. And why are cars being targeted over other means of transport? Why not have equality with the same targets for motorbikes, lorries, vans, trains, buses, ships, planes?
  17. Only this time it's not forced by law so a good test to see how many folks willingly submit.
  18. I do a bit feel nervous about discussing some of these subjects in public, I guess that's the point. But when I think about our collapsing fertility rates, that should be elevated to a national emergency but is hardly ever discussed in the MSM. How many babies aren't being born to couples who want them? That shortfall must be equivalent to a major epidemic such as covid.
  19. Sounds good, worth looking into. But unfortunately, the last time I tried buying some borax for making slime (in the UK), I was told it's been banned by the EU and they have borax substitute instead. The box says it contains sodium sesquicarbonate. I don't fancy experimenting with adding that to my drinking water
  20. yuk! but at least they say they don't put fluoride in their water. https://www.yorkshirewater.com/your-water/drinking-water-standards/fluoride-in-yorkshire-s-water/
  21. About 10 years ago when I was commenting online about a cold spell in the weather and doubting whether global warming (as it was called then) was happening yet, I was slapped down for not making a distinction between the climate (long-term average over about 20 years) and the weather (short-term immediate situation). Of course we should disregard peaks and troughs in the weather, and focus on the climate patterns instead. Since then, the name has been changed from global warming, to climate change, then to the "climate emergency". Suddenly every warm spell and storm is yet more proof of the emergency and we must achieve "net zero" (whatever that means), kept in a state of anxiety about it now that our attention span and boredom threshold have been ruined. The climate emergency is big business now, and as they say, 'business is business'.
  22. I'd define the universe as the all, everything, so multi-universes doesn't apply. But it frequently scrambles my mind, "everything" is such a paradoxical idea. There's no boundaries to everything. For example, everything includes God, so if God is the architect of the all, he's also the architect of himself which is self-referential. Which is why the only God I can cope with is pantheism. Asking how the universe started is also asking how time started, which is hard because there was no 'before' for time to spring from. It must have started from nothing. So cause-and-effect doesn't apply and asking 'how' without cause-and-effect to rely on is quite a challenge!
  23. If it's a small church, then home meetings could be just as valid as in a traditional church building, but maybe you meant just worshipping as individual families? I've heard historians say that the very early Christian church was effectively a network of house churches in members' homes. How do you reconcile that with the idea that Christianity is just a relationship with God through Jesus? Does this relationship require a community of other Christians; at face value you could relate to God 1 to 1.
  24. Maureen Martin didn't even suggest that non-hetero marriage should be outlawed. At least she's suing for wrongful dismissal, I look forward to seeing the outcome of that.
  25. I have a mild anxiety problem but don't remember any trauma which predates it. But there may be something I was too young to remember or have suppressed. In any case, past trauma and genetics are both facts we have to accept and deal with as best we can. I find meditation helpful. Also I bought some St John's wort recently, which I haven't started taking, but the packet says it's "to relieve the symptoms of slightly low mood and mild anxiety based on traditional use only." That sounds more realistic than calling it a miracle cure: I'm always sceptical of claims like that. Any advice how to use it? Eg take some when I'm already feeling anxious, or every day just in case? The packet says it's for short term use only.
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