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kj35

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Posts posted by kj35

  1. 3 minutes ago, Pinkiebee said:

    Well thats an arbitrary decision on what constitutes a different species.  Made entirely by you

     

     

    Err no. It's scientific classification. Now, I've a very dumpy legged dog to walk. I'll leave you to it.

  2. A fire blanket will do absolutely nothing in a lithium ion fire as oxygen is not needed in an exothermic chemical reaction thermal runaway fire. You may be confusing lithium metal batteries with li ion. Several things are postulated as causes for li ion fires, manufacturing defects, component defect, overcharging etc .but no real cause is pinpointed in the well made well built battery. Yet they still have fires. The very fact that you suggest a fire blanket or think that 40 gallons of petrol which will eventually burn itself out compared to a thermal runaway fire in a tesla battery which could burn or reignite for weeks after shows a lack of understanding this topic. 

  3. 7 hours ago, Pinkiebee said:

    Every fossil we find is a transitional species. They were all transitioning from something else into some thing else

     

    It's a really arbitrary man made classification of how much it has to change before you call it a new species.  Ie if an animal in is the process of loosing its legs. An example with shorter legs is a transition .  is it a new species? Depends how short they are I suppose 

    No. It just has shorter legs. There is plenty of fossil evidence for changes within a species and absolutely zero fossil evidence of species evolving into new species.  The classic archeoptryx example was roundly lauded as a lizard bird transitional fossil. Until they realised it wasn't. But rarely are theory of evolution documents corrected until you do a bit of digging. Even the natural history museum still has 'Lucy' in it's human evolution change pictorial in the main hall.

  4. 16 hours ago, peter said:

    Maybe the proof is in the DNA , I watched a show on where you come from few years back now ,they had four famous people and tested their genetics to see where they originated from,which was neither here nor there I couldn't care,what I did find interesting was everyone had neanderthal DNA in them which this so called geneticist(they said he was on the show ) said that all humans have it in small amounts ,however Ian Thorpe the swimmer,had unusually high amounts of neanderthal DNA.

    So I guess what I'm asking are modern humans the mutated offspring of neanderthals or did modern humans bread neanderthals out of existence,the one thing they didn't show was a person with RH negative blood,that would have been interesting .

    PS the show and its findings could have been all bullshit for all I know

    No I think that's correct. As neanderthals are a form of human like denisovans etc it stands to reason we could breed successfully with them. I think the standard thinking is that neanderthals were bred out of existence by the ' superior' tool wielding modern humans.  I read some interesting stuff on beaker people too, but might be going off topic. 

     

    I know and understand genetic manipulation can cause ' evolution ' changes . I guess the big question for me is whether this can happen by accident or only ( as I currently  believe) by design.

     

    Nice to chat to you again Peter xx ( I know it's me that's been AWOL !!)

  5. 1 hour ago, Pinkiebee said:

    The fire and how likely that is, is only part of the equation

     

    The main issue is the sudden and catastrophic release of stored energy and how much energy is stored to be suddenly released

     

    Or in short the battery shorting or the petrol tank going up. Nether are particularly easy to put out. Batteries tend to burn slightly slower in the release and explode less. Either means your looking for a new car , and possibly a garage , house 

     

    Petrol has a 100 times greater energy density than lithium per kg.  But then the batteries on electric cars weigh 500 kg so there is a considerable amount of stored energy in a fully charged battery.  Considerably more than a tank with a tenners worth in it

     

    Petrol tanks dont catch fire on their own it needs something else to go badly wrong or arson . batteries it seems do and especially when being charged.

     

    The standard advice from fire brigades is not to leave any battery charging unsupervised, particularly over night.

     

    Which practicably no one. Including I suspect member of the fire brigade takes any notice of. And a fair few do catch fire. But it's a tiny % of all rechargeable batteries in the country and seems from news reports to almost always be the batteries on e scooters and ebikes that go up. which is probebly a quality control issue at the back street manufacture in Shanghai that made it

     

    That any Tesla goes up, means that their quality control is suspect.  There is no good reason why they cant build batteries that never do that other than cost

    This isnt quite correct. Obviously petrol tanks aren't a feature of fully electric cars. Petrol will burn out and exhaust themselves whereas li ion fires can restart days or weeks after they were thought to have been extinguished.Thermal runaway in a lithium ion battery is a chemical exothermic fire the cause of which they 'theorise' is worsened by repetitive charging. But scientists still don't really know what triggers the reaction to commence. Short circuiting may be a feature but is not thought to be the main trigger.

     

    Most Teslas for example are not yet old enough for the suspected deterioration in the cells that causes the exothermic reaction to begin. Chopping batteries in back street garages isnt yet a feature of most electric cars but will worsen as they become more prevalent. E scooters,  laptops etc all use li ion in various sizes. Passenger planes will only allow the very smallest batteries in the cargo hold as fires have started which clearly has potentially devastating consequences for the plane.

     

    As for your final point

     

    'That any Tesla goes up, means that their quality control is suspect.  There is no good reason why they cant build batteries that never do that other than cost' 

     

    As already well documented the cause of these battery fires is still very unclear and therefore until the science behind the inception hazard is understood no amount of throwing cash at a battery build will solve the current situation.

  6. 34 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

    They already do, but I totally agree that this isn't making sense. He could have created his own platform for significantly less than what he is plowing into this. It's certainly not adding up, I don't see why he wants Twitter at all. 

    Could be that he wants quick access to the massive amount of data twitter already has on people. Emails, deleted tweets, historic errors. Rather than building a similar platform from scratch he can take what's already there.

    • Like 3
  7. On 9/18/2020 at 10:54 AM, Golden Retriever said:

     

    Hi KJ35

     

    Not a subject I know much about at all, but I found this archived link, which may be of interest you.

     

    Someone made a FOI request to the UK Ministry of Defense about their experiments concerning RV.

     

    The information released is heavily redacted, but I believe they based their experiments partly on the work of Ingo Swann.

     

    "A study was undertaken in 2001-2002 to investigate theories about capabilities to gather information remotely about what people may be seeing and to determine the potential value, if any, of such theories to Defence. The Ministry of Defence has released the findings of this study in response to a Freedom of Information request and we are pleased to now make it available to a wider audience via the MOD Freedom of Information Disclosure Log. Where indicated information has been withheld in accordance with Section 26 (Defence), Section 27 (International Relations), Section 40 (Personal Information), Section 41 (Information Provided In Confidence) and Section 43 (Commercial Interests) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000."

     

    https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121110090012/http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/FreedomOfInformation/DisclosureLog/SearchDisclosureLog/RemoteViewing.htm

    Bumping this article as it doesn't deserve to be lost in the day to day. Thanks to GR for providing it.

     

    Summary of main points 

     

    1. This is a genuine UK ministry of defence document,  heavily redacted which shows interest and further study of remote viewing goes on at Government level.

    2. The UK Government cite the work of Ingo Swann as an expert.

    3. The test subjects were deliberately untrained to provide a control group against future experiments with RV trained experts. Their words.

    4. 3 of the 20 untrained test subjects accessed the target to varying degrees. 

    5. Clear knowledge in the Government that electrical activity in the brain is altered under RV.

    • Like 2
  8. 12 hours ago, DarianF said:

    @kj35 I've got a specific time code here for you (it should work from the embed below), which gets into splitting as seen in molecular and fossil evidence. Is that the kind of thing you are looking for?

     

     

    An example (cited above) by Coyne, also explained here by Ridley:

     

     

    That sounds interesting I'll check it out later thanks @DarianF

    • Like 1
  9. 3 minutes ago, DarianF said:

     

    The video is for anyone who is interested in the subject in general. The topic is speciation and Coyne is one of the world's leading experts on the subject, having written a detailed textbook on the matter ( https://www.cell.com/current-biology/comments/S0960-9822(04)00541-X ). So in that way, it's relevant to the discussion on speciation.

     

    When you want specific examples, what do you mean exactly? Are you expecting to see species separating in real time? Obviously you can't see that, because the time scales involved are generally vast. The mathematical modeling you highlight is part of the process of understanding the mechanisms involved. As I said, it's not a simple matter:

     

     

    But back to the point I made about vast time frames, perhaps not necessarily:

     

     

    The link you provide to Berkeley is STILL talking about variations within a bird species.

     

    We have no problem finding intact fossils millions of years old. Why is there no fossil proof of species evolving into new species? Even followers of Darwin have had to change from slow changes should be evident in the fossil record to now theorising that dramatic sudden changes are now the fashionable groupthink for evolution. And yet, still no proof.  Why is that? 

    • Like 2
  10. 6 minutes ago, DarianF said:

     

    It's definitely not a simple matter. Complex subject area.

     

     

    I have not misunderstood the article you presented. Perhaps if you think I have you could point out where and explain rather than post another video? The article uses mathematical modelling to postulate evolution but nowhere does it detail evidence for and examples of actual species altering other than divergences within species or hybrid sterilisation.

    • Like 1
  11. 20 minutes ago, DarianF said:

    I've read that article, and it says nothing new. It still describes variations within a species and dresses it up as evolutionary change. For example this paragraph 

     

    'Ecological speciation in host-plant associated populations of Timema cristinae walking-stick insects (individual populations feed on either the Ceanothus spinosus host plant or on Adenostoma fasciculatum). Pairs of populations feeding on the same host plant species, but in different geographic localities, are ecologically similar and assumed to not be subject to divergent selection. In contrast, pairs of populations feeding on different host plant species are ecologically divergent and subject to divergent selection. Different-host pairs (n = 15 pairs) exhibit significantly greater reproductive isolation due to divergent mating preferences (i.e., sexual isolation) than do same-host pairs (n = 13 pairs). This pattern is independent from neutral genetic divergence, a proxy for time since divergence. Mean divergence is shown for the mitochondrial COI gene (mtDNA) and for the nuclear IT-2 gene (nDNA).'

     

    Still is talking about divergence within stick insects. Not species evolving into new ones.  

    • Like 2
  12. 10 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

    It certainly is Peter, another load of bollocks. I was reading quite recently about an arctic explorer from the 20's that took on an Inuit diet which consisted mainly of fish, whale, seal and caribou. 

     

    It was said that eating highly fatty meat is far better than lean cuts and the guy did this for 2 years, was studied by scientists and the only time he was ill, was when they fed him leaner cuts and he soon rectified it with fattier meat. 

     

    Supposedly the Inuit fees the dogs the lean cuts and they eat all the fat. Crazy stuff. 

     

    2 hours ago, peter said:

    cholesterol and the need to reduce it is a prime example ,it was the theory of one man

    Article that covers both your points with references :-) 

     

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/52c8ccea-3672-4203-bde8-e5a3f205c208?shareToken=7f7b62f92a0d9480ff3535879391473f

    • Thanks 2
  13. What's our Billy boy been up to besides being found out for playing with paedophiles, getting divorced and sexually harrasing subordinates?? Why,  he is building an experimental nuclear reactor...as you do.

     

     

    Bill Gates-backed experimental nuclear power plant heads to tiny Wyoming city

    Officials have announced that Kemmerer, population 2,600, will be the site of a plant featuring a liquid sodium-cooled reactor

     

    A tiny city in the top US coalmining state of Wyoming is set to become the home of an experimental nuclear power project backed by Bill Gates.

    The new Natrium nuclear power plant will be located in Kemmerer, officials announced on Tuesday, and will replace a coal-fired plant that is set to close in 2025.

    “Our innovative technology will help ensure the continued production of reliable electricity while also transitioning our energy system and creating new, good-paying jobs in Wyoming,” said Chris Levesque, the CEO of TerraPower, the company behind the project that was founded by Gates about 15 years ago. Construction is set to begin in 2024.

     

    The project will employ as many as 2,000 people during construction and 250 once operational in a state where the coal industry has been shedding jobs. Kemmerer, one of four cities in the running to host the project, is home to 2,600 people and is located about 130 miles (210 km) north-east of Salt Lake City.

    Bill Gates and Warren Buffett to build new kind of nuclear reactor in Wyoming

    Read more

    If it’s as reliable as conventional nuclear power, the 345-megawatt plant would produce enough climate-friendly power to serve about 250,000 homes. The announcement came days after world leaders met at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow.

    Gates, co-founder of Microsoft and chairman of TerraPower, in June announced plans for the Wyoming project along with officials from Rocky Mountain Power, Joe Biden’s administration and the state of Wyoming, which produces about 40% of the nation’s coal.

    “We think Natrium will be a gamechanger for the energy industry,” Gates said at the project’s launch in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

    Proponents of the project, which will feature a sodium-cooled fast reactor and molten salt energy storage, say it would perform better, be safer and cost less than traditional nuclear power.

    “Natrium will be that next improvement on safety. Importantly it won’t rely on outside sources of power, pumps and extra equipment to help the plant recover in the event of an emergency,” said Levesque, referring to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster caused by a tsunami that knocked out emergency generators.

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    The high heat-transfer properties of sodium will allow the Natrium plant to be air-cooled. That will enable the plant to be quickly shut down in case of an emergency, and the absence of emergency generators and pumps will save on costs, Levesque said.

    Others are skeptical about the benefits of sodium compared with water for cooling as in conventional nuclear plants.

    “The use of liquid sodium has many problems. It’s a very volatile material that can catch fire if it’s exposed to air or water,” said Edwin Lyman, director of nuclear power safety with the Union of Concerned Scientists science advocacy non-profit.

    Countries including the US have experimented with sodium-cooled fast reactors for decades but only Russia has fielded such a reactor on a large, power-producing scale, Lyman said.

    “Honestly I don’t understand the motivation,” Lyman said. “There are some people who are just strong advocates for it and they’ve sort of won the day here by convincing Bill Gates that this is a good technology to pursue.”

     

     

    Bill Gates and Melinda French Gates finalize divorce, court document shows

    36w ago

    Bill Gates and Warren Buffett to build new kind of nuclear reactor in Wyoming

    45w ago

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    • Thanks 1
  14. At our allotments people ignore the lock up your birds dictate. And everything has been fine. Still free range eggs to be bartered for. Most allotments allow hens, bee hives and meat rabbits. All good for food sources. So that's what's being attacked. Independent food production. But then, you all know that.

    • Like 1
  15. On 4/7/2022 at 5:17 PM, kj35 said:

    This doesn't surprise me. In my former life my job entailed looking at a lot of products.  A main one flagged up was nano particles used as 'silver ' in things like deodorants. Only after these silver nanoparticles were in widespread product use was it ' discovered ' the nano particles crossed the blood brain barrier where previously it was thought they wouldn't.  By this point  silver nano technology was in such widespread use it was too late to do anything and a worldwide ' watch and see' approach was taken. Interestingly and this is MY THEORY only most of these silver nano particles were in men's deodorant.  And there seems to be a marked increase in male Parkinson's diagnosis.

    Article in today's DI headlines on this topic.

     

    Nanotechnology Used in ‘Covid’ Vaccines And 2,000 Foods Goes Unlabelled
    https://davidicke.com/2022/04/11/nanotechnology-used-in-covid-vaccines-and-2000-foods-goes-unlabelled/

    • Confused 1
  16. Hi Ann, welcome.  I'm not in Stoke but know it well. What you describe are chemtrails. If you want to do more research on what they are you should also look at something called HAARP as a start point. 

    • Like 1
  17. Allotment diary April 2022 northern hemisphere. Organic.

     

    Sowing.

     

    Onion seed has just gone in, can be sown direct to soil. Broad beans went in February and March last chance to put more in this month.Onion sets planted but we want to move away from this commercial way of growing hence the onion seed experiment. 

     

    Planting

     

    Seeds brought on in greenhouse planted out as young plants, today in went summer cabbage, broccoli, fennel.

     

    Growing 

     

    Autumn sown onion and garlic growing really well. Early potatoes still not visible above ground, maincrop goes in Good Friday. Kale, perpetual spinach, Savoy cabbage, purple sprouting broccoli all been a triumph and are still producing. Not as successful is cauliflower which only needs a bit of bird poo etc to totally ruin it. Quite a lot of effort for not much output, probably won't do cauliflower again. 

     

    Rhubarb growing but not ready to harvest yet. Some allotment holders have forced theirs for early crops, this does look worth doing next year.

     

    Rosemary, bay leaves,  mint, lemon balm all doing well. 

     

     

     

    Harvesting

     

    Pulled last of the Brussels sprouts. Harvesting Savoy cabbage one a week amazingly easy and tasty. Pulling fresh kale leaves regularly. Spinach cut and come again. Garlic leaves off the wild garlic picked and frozen immediately for incredible flavour.

     

    Seed collection

     

    Nothing to collect, considering letting one Savoy go over to produce seed heads.

     

    Jobs

     

    Compost turned from bin 1 to bin 2. New bin 1 for this year started.  Comfrey plant cleared and trimmed ready to start collecting leaves for fruit and flower feed.  I'll detail how to do this when I start, probably next month.

     

    Must hoe annual weeds now as they start to grow. In April they're little and easy to control but if you let them get away from you now by June they'll be almost impossible to eradicate.

     

    Tips

     

    Plastic pop bottles with bottom cut off and upended over the top of young seedlings, stabilised with bamboo cane makes a mini greenhouse and protects against late frosts and pigeons. I'll add a photo next time, forgot phone today.

     

    Insectwatch.

     

    Bumblebees evident harvesting pollen from nettle flowers and daffodils

     

    Pestwatch

     

    Decking boards laid at bottom of fence to try and stop our daily battle with 'Stew' our invading rabbit.

     

    • Like 2
  18. Third season now of our allotment and we are really starting to get into the rhythm of growing and seasons. I think if I put a monthly diary on this thread others might find it helpful , or not,   but as a minimum I can look back and see how the season progressed. 

    • Like 2
  19. 9 hours ago, oddsnsods said:

     

    Like when he landed it on the platform in the sea, was sketchy agreed.

     

    And the Nasa video I posted, ive never seen anyone explain or try to..is some kinda gaslighting going on there? Decepticons mocking us or what.

    How would they make something like that appear? If its not blatant CGI.

    Answers on a postcard. 😆

    I was watching that live, it was so obviously faked it was laughable. I understand they might have had 'back up ' tape in case of filming blackouts etc but this was a joke. 

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