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kj35

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Posts posted by kj35

  1. 3 minutes ago, TheConsultant said:



    Yes the tunnels absolutely exist, much of the information from that little clip above is based in evidenced information, I think the response from a couple of people just pushes me towards watching it all now. Certainly more productive than replying to enig and nov. Did you down the clip or the series?

    It says season one but looks like just one episode? Season 2 is on prime. I'll take a look and report back. I've even got a photo of me on Hitler's main headquarters stairs, the same stairs they did tons of photos from.  The building they're in in Munich is owned by a private company now. I didn't know until after the photo was taken. 

     

     

  2. Copy of the open letter

     

     

    Open Letter to Bill Gates from AGRA Watch & 50 Co-Signers
    Posted on November 11, 2022
    An Open Letter to Bill Gates on Food, Farming, and Africa
    AGRA Watch drafted this letter in response to two recent articles we found very troubling. We are joined by 50 organizations focused on food sovereignty and justice worldwide, who want Bill Gates to know there is no shortage of practical solutions and innovations by African farmers and organizations. We invite him to step back and learn from those on the ground.
    Published November 10, 2022 on Common Dreams: https://www.commondreams.org/views/2022/11/10/open-letter-bill-gates-food-farming-and-africa
    Share the Instagram story
    Dear Bill Gates:

    You were recently featured commenting on the global state of agriculture and food insecurity, in a recent New York Times op-ed by David Wallace-Wells and also in an Associated Press article.

    In both articles, you make a number of claims that are inaccurate and need to be challenged. Both pieces admit that the world currently produces enough food to adequately feed all the earth’s inhabitants, yet you continue to fundamentally misdiagnose the problem as relating to low productivity; we do not need to increase production as much as to assure more equitable access to food. In addition, there are four specific distortions in these pieces which should be addressed, namely: 1) the supposed need for “credit for fertilizer, cheap fertilizer” to ensure agricultural productivity, 2) the idea that the Green Revolution of the mid-20th century needs to be replicated now to address hunger, 3) the idea that “better” seeds, often produced by large corporations, are required to cope with climate change, and 4) your suggestion that if people have solutions that “aren’t singing Kumbaya,” you’ll put money behind them.

    First, synthetic fertilizers contribute 2% of overall greenhouse gas emissions and are the primary source of nitrous oxide emissions. Producing nitrogen fertilizers requires 3-5% of the world’s fossil gas. They also make farmers and importing nations dependent on volatile prices on international markets, and are a major cause of rising food prices globally. Yet you claim that even more fertilizer is needed to increase agricultural productivity and address hunger. Toxic and damaging synthetic fertilizers are not a feasible way forward. Already, companies, organizations, and farmers in Africa and elsewhere have been developing biofertilizers made from compost, manure, and ash, and biopesticides made from botanical compounds, such as neem tree oil or garlic. These products can be manufactured locally (thereby avoiding dependency and price volatility), and can be increasingly scaled up and commercialized.

    Second, the Green Revolution was far from a resounding success. While it did play some role in increasing the yields of cereal crops in Mexico, India, and elsewhere from the 1940s to the 1960s, it did very little to reduce the number of hungry people in the world or to ensure equitable and sufficient access to food. It also came with a host of other problems, from ecological issues like long-term soil degradation to socio-economic ones like increased inequality and indebtedness (which has been a major contributor to the epidemic of farmer suicides in India). Your unquestioning support for a “new” Green Revolution demonstrates willful ignorance about history and about the root causes of hunger (which are by and large about political and economic arrangements, and what the economist Amartya Sen famously referred to as entitlements, not about a global lack of food).

    Third, climate-resilient seeds are already in existence and being developed by farmers and traded through informal seed markets. Sorghum, which you tout in your interview as a so-called “orphan crop”, is among these already established climate-adapted crops. You note that most investments have been in maize and rice, rather than in locally-adapted and nutritious cereals like sorghum. Yet AGRA (the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa), which your foundation (the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) created and financed, has been among those institutions that have disproportionately focused on maize and rice. In other words, you are part of creating the very problem you name. The AGRA initiative, which your foundation continues to fund, has also pushed restrictive seed legislation that limits and restricts crop innovation to well-resourced labs and companies. These initiatives don’t increase widespread innovation, but rather contribute to the privatization and consolidation of corporate monopolies over seed development and seed markets.

    Finally, your assertion that critics of your approach are simply “singing Kumbaya,” rather than developing meaningful (and fundable) solutions, is extremely disrespectful and dismissive. There are already many tangible, ongoing proposals and projects that work to boost productivity and food security–from biofertilizer and biopesticide manufacturing facilities, to agroecological farmer training programs, to experimentation with new water and soil management techniques, low-input farming systems, and pest-deterring plant species. What you are doing here is gaslighting–presenting practical, ongoing, farmer-led solutions as somehow fanciful or ridiculous, while presenting your own preferred approaches as pragmatic. Yet it is your preferred high-tech solutions, including genetic engineering, new breeding technologies, and now digital agriculture, that have in fact consistently failed to reduce hunger or increase food access as promised. And in some cases, the “solutions” you expound as fixes for climate change actually contribute to the the biophysical processes driving the problem (e.g. more fossil-fuel based fertilizers, and more fossil-fuel dependent infrastructure to transport them) or exacerbate the political conditions that lead to inequality in food access (e.g. policies and seed breeding initiatives that benefit large corporations and labs, rather than farmers themselves).

    In both articles, you radically simplify complex issues in ways that justify your own approach and interventions. You note in the New York Times op-ed that Africa, with the lowest costs of labor and land, should be a net exporter of agricultural products. You explain that the reason it is not is because “their productivity is much lower than in rich countries and you just don’t have the infrastructure.” However, costs of land and labor, as well as infrastructures, are socially and politically produced. Africa is in fact highly productive–it’s just that the profits are realized elsewhere. Through colonization, neoliberalism, debt traps, and other forms of legalized pillaging, African lives, environments, and bodies have been devalued and made into commodities for the benefit and profit of others. Infrastructures have been designed to channel these commodities outside of the continent itself. Africa is not self-sufficient in cereals because its agricultural, mining, and other resource-intensive sectors have been structured in ways that are geared toward serving colonial and then international markets, rather than African peoples themselves. Although you are certainly not responsible for all of this, you and your foundation are exacerbating some of these problems through a very privatized, profit-based, and corporate approach to agriculture.

    There is no shortage of practical solutions and innovations by African farmers and organizations. We invite you to step back and learn from those on the ground. At the same time, we invite high profile news outlets to be more cautious about lending credibility to one wealthy white man’s flawed assumptions, hubris, and ignorance, at the expense of people and communities who are living and adapting to these realities as we speak.

    From:

    Community Alliance for Global Justice/AGRA Watch

     

    Signatories:-

     

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    1322 S Bayview Street, Suite 300

    Seattle, WA 98144

    (206) 405-4600

      

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    Open Letter to Bill Gates from AGRA Watch & 50 Co-Signers

    Posted on November 11, 2022

    An Open Letter to Bill Gates on Food, Farming, and Africa

    AGRA Watch drafted this letter in response to two recent articles we found very troubling. We are joined by 50 organizations focused on food sovereignty and justice worldwide, who want Bill Gates to know there is no shortage of practical solutions and innovations by African farmers and organizations. We invite him to step back and learn from those on the ground.

    Published November 10, 2022 on Common Dreams: https://www.commondreams.org/views/2022/11/10/open-letter-bill-gates-food-farming-and-africa

    Share the Instagram story

    Dear Bill Gates:

    You were recently featured commenting on the global state of agriculture and food insecurity, in a recent New York Times op-ed by David Wallace-Wells and also in an Associated Press article.

    In both articles, you make a number of claims that are inaccurate and need to be challenged. Both pieces admit that the world currently produces enough food to adequately feed all the earth’s inhabitants, yet you continue to fundamentally misdiagnose the problem as relating to low productivity; we do not need to increase production as much as to assure more equitable access to food. In addition, there are four specific distortions in these pieces which should be addressed, namely: 1) the supposed need for “credit for fertilizer, cheap fertilizer” to ensure agricultural productivity, 2) the idea that the Green Revolution of the mid-20th century needs to be replicated now to address hunger, 3) the idea that “better” seeds, often produced by large corporations, are required to cope with climate change, and 4) your suggestion that if people have solutions that “aren’t singing Kumbaya,” you’ll put money behind them.

    First, synthetic fertilizers contribute 2% of overall greenhouse gas emissions and are the primary source of nitrous oxide emissions. Producing nitrogen fertilizers requires 3-5% of the world’s fossil gas. They also make farmers and importing nations dependent on volatile prices on international markets, and are a major cause of rising food prices globally. Yet you claim that even more fertilizer is needed to increase agricultural productivity and address hunger. Toxic and damaging synthetic fertilizers are not a feasible way forward. Already, companies, organizations, and farmers in Africa and elsewhere have been developing biofertilizers made from compost, manure, and ash, and biopesticides made from botanical compounds, such as neem tree oil or garlic. These products can be manufactured locally (thereby avoiding dependency and price volatility), and can be increasingly scaled up and commercialized.

    Second, the Green Revolution was far from a resounding success. While it did play some role in increasing the yields of cereal crops in Mexico, India, and elsewhere from the 1940s to the 1960s, it did very little to reduce the number of hungry people in the world or to ensure equitable and sufficient access to food. It also came with a host of other problems, from ecological issues like long-term soil degradation to socio-economic ones like increased inequality and indebtedness (which has been a major contributor to the epidemic of farmer suicides in India). Your unquestioning support for a “new” Green Revolution demonstrates willful ignorance about history and about the root causes of hunger (which are by and large about political and economic arrangements, and what the economist Amartya Sen famously referred to as entitlements, not about a global lack of food).

    Third, climate-resilient seeds are already in existence and being developed by farmers and traded through informal seed markets. Sorghum, which you tout in your interview as a so-called “orphan crop”, is among these already established climate-adapted crops. You note that most investments have been in maize and rice, rather than in locally-adapted and nutritious cereals like sorghum. Yet AGRA (the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa), which your foundation (the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) created and financed, has been among those institutions that have disproportionately focused on maize and rice. In other words, you are part of creating the very problem you name. The AGRA initiative, which your foundation continues to fund, has also pushed restrictive seed legislation that limits and restricts crop innovation to well-resourced labs and companies. These initiatives don’t increase widespread innovation, but rather contribute to the privatization and consolidation of corporate monopolies over seed development and seed markets.

    Finally, your assertion that critics of your approach are simply “singing Kumbaya,” rather than developing meaningful (and fundable) solutions, is extremely disrespectful and dismissive. There are already many tangible, ongoing proposals and projects that work to boost productivity and food security–from biofertilizer and biopesticide manufacturing facilities, to agroecological farmer training programs, to experimentation with new water and soil management techniques, low-input farming systems, and pest-deterring plant species. What you are doing here is gaslighting–presenting practical, ongoing, farmer-led solutions as somehow fanciful or ridiculous, while presenting your own preferred approaches as pragmatic. Yet it is your preferred high-tech solutions, including genetic engineering, new breeding technologies, and now digital agriculture, that have in fact consistently failed to reduce hunger or increase food access as promised. And in some cases, the “solutions” you expound as fixes for climate change actually contribute to the the biophysical processes driving the problem (e.g. more fossil-fuel based fertilizers, and more fossil-fuel dependent infrastructure to transport them) or exacerbate the political conditions that lead to inequality in food access (e.g. policies and seed breeding initiatives that benefit large corporations and labs, rather than farmers themselves).

    In both articles, you radically simplify complex issues in ways that justify your own approach and interventions. You note in the New York Times op-ed that Africa, with the lowest costs of labor and land, should be a net exporter of agricultural products. You explain that the reason it is not is because “their productivity is much lower than in rich countries and you just don’t have the infrastructure.” However, costs of land and labor, as well as infrastructures, are socially and politically produced. Africa is in fact highly productive–it’s just that the profits are realized elsewhere. Through colonization, neoliberalism, debt traps, and other forms of legalized pillaging, African lives, environments, and bodies have been devalued and made into commodities for the benefit and profit of others. Infrastructures have been designed to channel these commodities outside of the continent itself. Africa is not self-sufficient in cereals because its agricultural, mining, and other resource-intensive sectors have been structured in ways that are geared toward serving colonial and then international markets, rather than African peoples themselves. Although you are certainly not responsible for all of this, you and your foundation are exacerbating some of these problems through a very privatized, profit-based, and corporate approach to agriculture.

    There is no shortage of practical solutions and innovations by African farmers and organizations. We invite you to step back and learn from those on the ground. At the same time, we invite high profile news outlets to be more cautious about lending credibility to one wealthy white man’s flawed assumptions, hubris, and ignorance, at the expense of people and communities who are living and adapting to these realities as we speak.

    From:

    Community Alliance for Global Justice/AGRA Watch

    Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA)

    Biodiversity and Biosafety Association of Kenya (BIBA)

    Southern African Faith Communities’ Environment Institute (SAFCEI)

    GRAIN

    African Centre for Biodiversity

    Kenya Food Rights Alliance

    Growth Partners

    Grassroots International

    Agroecology Fund

    US Food Sovereignty Alliance

    National Family Farm Coalition

    Family Farm Defenders

    Oakland Institute

    A Growing Culture

    ETC Group

    Food in Neighborhoods Community Coalition

    Detroit Black Community Food Security Network

    Sustainable Agriculture of Louisville

    Haki Nawiri Afrika

    Real Food Media

    Agroecology Research-Action Collective

    Environmental Rights Action/ Friends of the Earth Nigeria (ERA/FoEN)

    Les Amis de la Terre Togo/ Friends of the Earth Togo

    Justiça Ambiental/ JA FoE Mozambique

    Friends of the Earth Africa

    Health of Mother Health Foundation (HOMEF)

    Committee on Vital Environmental Resources (COVER)

    The Young Environmental Network (TYEN)

    GMO Free Nigeria

    Community Development Advocacy Foundation

    African Centre for Rural and Environmental Development

    Connected Advocacy

    Policy Alert

    Zero Waste Ambassadors

    Student Environmental Assembly Nigeria (SEAN)

    Host Community Network, Nigeria (HoCON)

    Green Alliance Nigeria (GAN)

    Hope for Tomorrow Initiative (HfTI)

    Media Awareness and Justice Initiative (MAJI)

    We The People

    Rainbow Watch and Development Centre

    BFA Food and Health Foundation

    Corporate Accountability and Public Participation Africa (CAPPA)

    Women and Children Life Advancement Initiative 

    Network of Women in Agriculture Nigeria (NWIN) 

    Gender and Environmental Risks Reduction Initiative (GERI) 

    Gender and Community Empowerment Initiative 

    Eco defenders Network 

    Urban Rural Environmental Defenders (URED) 

    Peace Point Development Foundation (PPDF)

    Community Support Centre, Nigeria

     

    • Thanks 1
  3. It's interesting.  If you put yourself in a position where you are responsible for the whole world and without some semblance of order anarchy breaks out and murder and violent disorder runs everything, which appears to me to be where most humans devolve to without external moral pressure then how do you control the world?  Religion has been useful so has moral blackmail, same thing.

    • Like 1
  4. 8 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

     

    but does every year have 14,000 excess at home cardiac arrests?

    I'm not articulating well. Apologies not massively well today with pain.  WE know there's excess deaths WE know what's causing it. But Coventry news isn't covering the excess deaths story it's saying a bloke had a medical emergency and died. Something that is ordinarily so run of the mill it wouldn't make your local town Facebook page and yet it's not seen as odd by anyone.  So are the press warming up to start reporting on these excess deaths ? Because it's now so obvious  to the vaxxed Joe Public that everyone they know has heart issues?    I do hope so. And as you say to cover up they're using this new phrase to hide it for a bit longer.

    • Like 1
  5. 40 minutes ago, Macnamara said:

     

    it was posted up on the ickes headlines to flag up the new term we are going to be hearing a lot more which is to say that someone has had a 'medical emergency' which is a euphemistic term to conceal what has actually happened

     

    a 'medical emergency' could mean anything but if they don't want to admit that someone has died of a cardiac arrest in order to hide the ongoing heart troubles of the jabbed then they can conceal this with vague terms like 'medical emergency'

    Yes. But why on earth would Coventry news even report this ? WE know there's more of it going on but it is still an everyday occurrence surely? People die of heart attacks or whatever every day. 

  6. 2 hours ago, Macnamara said:

    JABBED?

    Man dies in medical emergency at Nuneaton home

    Claire Harrison - Yesterday 05:00
    A man died after a medical emergency at a house in Nuneaton. West Midlands Ambulance Service (WMAS) sent three ambulances to Arbury Road after receiving a 999 call.

    Despite the best efforts of paramedics the casualty, who has not been identified, sadly passed away. A WMAS spokesperson said: "We were called to reports of a medical emergency at a private address at 10.27am on Wednesday.

    "On arrival we discovered a male patient. Sadly, despite the best efforts of ambulance staff it became apparent nothing could be done to save the man and he was confirmed dead at the scene."

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/man-dies-in-medical-emergency-at-nuneaton-home/ar-AA13v47O?ocid=winp1taskbar&cvid=af5721020d1e4a8eacf209d20d25b351

    I don't get why that's even news though ? It's like " woman gets out of bed and has shower" . That stuff happens multiple times a day every day. Am I missing something?

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 2
  7. 24 minutes ago, Grumpy Owl said:

     

    Musk has bought Twitter because he has ulterior motives.

     

    Twitter itself will eventually be killed off, but the aim is to get 'everybody' onto this platform, while the underlying technology will be used for his supposed 'X' app.

     

    One app to rule them all. See 'WeChat' in China.

     

    Twitter is already a "cesspit of hate" and that's all part of the plan.

    The wechat also has total verification so they know exactly who is posting what. See also Musk's fuss re bots and verified users as part of the sale. 

    • Like 1
  8. 51 minutes ago, Tinfoil Hat said:

     

    Maybe a deliberately bad translation? Not that I believe the theory that he's opposing the actual NWO gang of sleazes, but with lies, double bluffs and propaganda all round being the order of the day, who knows anything, ever, anymore? (Someone who speaks good Russian, that's who 🙂)

    Hi x I've put a translation on the war thread 

  9. 3 minutes ago, legion said:

     

    We so so so need these people to come forwards and speak out

    Literally one week later my own mother in law had an episode of uncontrolled bleeding and different paramedics asked the same question about vaccine. " have you been vaccinated recently? " "which one? " and I was there. They know. This is 2 weeks ago.

    • Like 4
    • Sad 4
  10. 3 minutes ago, Morpheus said:

    Screenshot_20221027-192817_DuckDuckGo.jpg

    God. That's so good. I now know someone personally who has died as a result of the latest 2 in 1 vaccine . Paramedics attending asked specifically which vaccine she had had and confirmed they were attending extra call outs because of it. 

    • Like 2
    • Sad 3
  11. Putin openly discusses global world order in speech 27/10/22

     

    There are 'tectonic shifts of the whole global order', Putin says, as questions turn to Ukraine

    Vladimir Putin is then asked what has changed in the world in the last year, for, as some suggest, it has been turned upside down.

    He said: "What's happening in Ukraine in particular, these are not changes that are currently under way or are under way since the start of the special military operation.

    "These changes have been happening for many years now. Some have been paying attention.

    "These are tectonic shifts of the whole global order.

    "First, it's all very calm, very tranquil... these plates are on the move constantly and then they come up against one another, the tensions build up and an earthquake happens.

    "This is what happens here. First, an accumulation of tensions and then an earthquake.

    "These tensions used to happen in the past. New centres of powers are emerging - I'm not the only one to say that.

    "These changes are happening due to objective reasons."

    Mr Putin said it is the "West that has driven us to this point" in Ukraine.

    However, he said what is happening in Ukraine will "benefit Russia and its future" because it will "help reinforce its sovereignty - in all domains but in particular in its economic fields."

    "In the past we were thinking we were turning into some kind of Islamic colony because we couldn't do anything without or Western partners," he said.

    Mr Putin insisted Russia can "replace those who are leaving our markets" in the wake of the war in Ukraine.

  12. 16 hours ago, truther79 said:

    A good osteopath and chiropractor would recommend having one if they felt it necessary before they started treatment. That's what I had.

     

    On rare occasions, and I mean rare - treatment is not recommended. For the vast majority though, unless there is something severely wrong with a person's spine picked up on an MRI, then chiropractic help will benefit someone 👍

     

    If all you have is minor ligament dysfunction I agree. But it can be almost impossible to spot without an MRI. Thd hospital missed my broken neck a further accident prompted investigations which revealed a previously broken neck which had self healed. Osteos had tried a few osteo techniques thankfully unsuccessfully as there was a tiny amount of undamaged spinal cord left at one place which if osteo techniques had succeeded would have paralysed me from the neck down. So I'm naturally cautious . If you've had everything checked with an MRI and no cause can be found and osteos bring some relief...fill your boots.

    • Like 1
  13. 1 hour ago, dfjkldoioi said:

    So do you think if I purchase the book it will tell me all the training technicks?

    The best book I have found for teaching the basics including remote viewing is ingo swann 

     

    "Everybody's Guide to Natural ESP: Unlocking the Extrasensory Power of Your Mind' 

    • Like 2
  14. 4 hours ago, Neil James said:

    A short video featuring the campaign in Scotland to highlight the injuries & deaths as a result of mRNA injections.

    The campaign is growing every week; travelling around towns & cities throughout Scotland. It is not intended to be a protest or rally, but to raise awareness amongst the general public in a non-confrontational manner. Once the exhibit is set up, the images do the talking. There are a few people on hand to answer questions, but in the main, we leave it to the public to do the talking. It's about them, not us, after all.

    https://odysee.com/@truthbrigade:6/paisley:8?r=DLvNFSKDtq3ZDyqBkjMnZD3QSNM57qwN

    What an incredible way to get the message across. 

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 2
  15. 10 minutes ago, truther79 said:

    The first thing anyone should do with a bad back is see a good osteopath or chiropractor.

     

    No amount of stretching will help if the joints are stuck and need re-aligning.

     

     

     

    100% do NOT do this. You need to see a qualified physiotherapist.  Of someone had tried to manipulate my back without an MRI they'd have paralysed me. 

  16. 30 minutes ago, webtrekker said:

     

    Out of reactions again, but kudos to you KJ.

     

    gging_lai.gif.960798e374f6f822b36030527a254856.gif

     

     

     

    Aahh..dunno. right place right time. I wish I'd done black and often say I'm black belt anyway ( pride) . There's 2 brown belts. 1st brown and 2nd brown. 2nd brown is pretty identical to black but to be awarded black you have to commit to take a class and teach and I just couldn't/ didn't have the time to to that. It's a good rule.

    • Like 2
  17. Just now, webtrekker said:

     

    Got to admit, I have as much respect for Dan Inosanto as I do for Bruce Lee. A true Master.

    I've trained with Bob. A few years back now, but total respect for the man. 

    • Thanks 1
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