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webtrekker

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Everything posted by webtrekker

  1. Well, it's over for now. Official story - implosion.
  2. I'd prefer to spend my waking hours fighting for survival than sitting reading and hoping for divine intervention. That's not to say I don't have beliefs of my own, it's just that I don't believe the 'Army of the Lord' can save me, or anyone, for that matter. In the words of The Killers ... 'I got soul, but I'm not a soldier.'
  3. Yep. Difficult situations demand difficult choices. My money would be on father and son acting together.
  4. What a way to go, indeed. In fact, it reminds me of all the old folk given Midazolam who were also left gasping for their last breath. Where was the media coverage for them, and where were the emergency teams delivering last ditch attempts to save them?
  5. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/syria-migrants-boat-sinking-titanic-submersive-missing-rcna90336 Just keeping things in perspective.
  6. I read this article this morning and still haven't heard of any updates to it ... British rescue mission for Titan ‘blocked by US officials’ By Jamie Bullen 20 June 2023 • 9:59am A remotely operated vehicle capable of winching the stricken submersible Titan out of the Atlantic has been blocked from joining the rescue mission by the US government, The Telegraph understands. A team from deepwater specialists Magellan Limited has been waiting to leave an airport in the Channel Islands since 7pm on Monday, but approval for take-off has yet to be received. The Guernsey-based firm produced the first full-sized digital scan of the Titanic last summer, the largest underwater project of its kind as two submarines put together 700,000 images of the wreck. Bretton Hunchak, former president of RMS Titanic, Inc, which collaborated with Magellan, says the company has essential equipment and expertise to help locate OceanGate’s Titan submersible that went missing on a dive to the wreck of the luxury passenger liner, which sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in April 1912. But despite receiving apparent clearance from the Ministry of Defence to leave UK airspace, the American government has allegedly yet to authorise the team’s request to join rescuers 435 miles south of St John’s, Newfoundland. Mr Hunchak said US officials have indicated they would prefer to use a New York-based vessel capable of exploring 3,000m below water, whereas Magellan’s can plunge depths of up to 5,000m. He added Magellan’s remotely operated vehicle was unique in that it was likely the only asset available to have a winch capable of dragging submersibles from the depths of the ocean. It can also detect signals and send them above the surface. Mr Hunchak said the desperate situation was “painful” to him as he described Paul-Henry Nargeolet, a Frenchman reported to be among those on the submersible, as a “personal mentor”. He told The Telegraph: “We have British, French and US citizens on board and every minute here counts. This is not a rational decision, this is the only asset we have with a winch and the guys are experts in this area. “Why not run both vessels? The more help we can get the better and denying us means you are giving up on every option you have to save lives. “These are irreplaceable human beings.” More here ...
  7. Mind you, you don't need to be particularly well off to experience a trip underwater. In 2000 we went on a cruise & stay in Barbados. The Atlantis Submarine was moored just off Bridgetown so we went for a dip on it. It seats about 48 people and is underwater for around 45 minutes, diving to about 150 ft to view the coral. It was great and we saw all sorts swimming around, including turtles. Ok, it's nowhere near as risky as the Titanic submersible, not by a long shot, and I get that, but sometimes you have to take some risks to enjoy life to the full, otherwise what's the point? The coral reef was amazing viewed through the large domed window at the front. It was brilliantly lit up by the sub and the colours were beautiful.
  8. I find quit a lot of this going on in everyday life. Rich businessman gets bored, uses his wealth and influence to try something highly dangerous, pays the consequences. In my area a well-known haulage boss bought a helicopter. He'd had no previous experience of flying a chopper but hey, what could possibly go wrong? Well, something did go badly wrong and it ended in the deaths of himself and one of his sons. Rich boys and their toys, coupled with huge egos and zero experience make a bad mix, unfortunately.
  9. Monty Python may have been onto something too ...
  10. Sorry Alexa, but I don't believe for one minute that this had anything to do with Freemasonry. The more obvious reasons, to my mind anyway, would be that shoes could damage the inside of the hull, or maybe feet swell up after being confined for 10 hours in cramped conditions. Anyway, they removed ALL of their shoes, not just one each! Not everything is a conspiracy!
  11. Amnesty for Covid Fines. It would be better to pardon and return the 120,000 Covid fines than fine yet more partygoers. Laura Dodsworth 20 Jun 2023 On the 23rd March 2020, Boris Johnson announced to the nation in a severe, wartime-style address that we must stay at home and that the police would have powers to enforce the rules. The speech was littered with threats of power, penalty, danger, death. Nobody was in any doubt that we were not supposed to go to parties. People are understandably angry about the gross hypocrisy on display at the ‘Jingle and Mingle’ Christmas party at Conservative HQ, in the latest episode of the ‘Partygate’ scandal. There are two points I think are more important in the bigger picture. The first point is what it means that people ‘in the know’ were breaking the rules. Let us quickly set aside the idea that they thought they were operating within the rules. The rules did change fast and they were confusing, but socialising indoors was not allowed. We knew it. The police knew it. The 120,000 Covid Fixed Penalty Notices attest to it. Were the powers proportionate? Well, that’s something that lawyers, scientists, ethicists and everyone who had to live under the damn rules has been pondering. I say no. I always said no. Lord Sumption said no, so I think I am in very good company. And it turns out that those in government did not act as though the rules were proportionate because they did not obey them. They did not seem to feel that their lives were in mortal danger. You might say they had done a reasonable job of assessing their own risk. Long before lockdown, it was understood that Covid was nasty and dangerous but that the risk was highly related to age, obesity and other clinical factors. A WHO report as early as mid-February 2020 set this out. There were still unknowns but the risk factors were understood earlier than most people like to think. These partygoers were not in fear of their lives, nor was Boris Johnson and nor was Professor Neil Ferguson, who earnt himself the moniker ‘Professor Pantsdown’ for travelling across London for illicit nookie. Despite being the one who predicted that hundreds of thousands of people could die, he was content to ‘risk’ the lives of two families by travelling to meet his extra-marital lover. Why? We can assume he understood the risk. That is the key to this story. The risk was exaggerated and fear was amplified to induce us to follow the draconian, cruel and un-evidenced rules which had devastating consequences for peoples lives, mental health, education and the economy. That doesn’t mean it was right that the partygoers broke the rules and tried to get away with it. People are right to be angry about the hypocrisy and double standards. Many of us didn’t have parties for our children. My sons 16th birthday was attended by no one outside of our little household during that interminably grim third lockdown. Wedding receptions were cancelled. Hell, weddings were cancelled! Funerals were miserly affairs. Fathers weren’t at births. The casualties go on. So to see people tipsy and twirling around does stick in the craw. It’s easy to push for justice, retribution and punishment when you are angry. But, if you’re angry about people dancing at parties and getting away with it, then aren’t you also angry that two students were fined £10000 each for organising a snowball fight in Leeds in January 2021? People were fined for cups of tea with neighbours, going for walks and sitting on benches. They were fined for perfectly normal human behaviour. It was disproportionate. The fine for 'recklessly' leaving self-isolation was £4,000. That would have been a staggering 16-week salary for someone in the bottom fifth of earnings. These were the worst fines this country has known since the Dark Ages. A report by the National Police Chief’s Council found that compared to the population, fines were more likely to be issued to men, to those aged 18-24, to those from ethnic minority backgrounds, and to those living in areas with higher levels of deprivation. Three quarters of FPNs were issued to white people but, proportionately, people from ethnic minorities were 2.3 times more likely than white people to receive an FPN in England and 2.8 times more likely in Wales. No sane, just or compassionate society should tolerate the unfairness. Which brings me to my second point: rather than seek retribution for revellers what about amnesty for all Covid lockdown rule breakers? The cases still in the courts could be cancelled. Fines could be returned. Didn’t everyone suffer enough during that terrible time? After the Second World War, Winston Churchill resolved to have a ‘bonfire of state controls’ and ID cards were scrapped. We have an opportunity to consider the sort of society we want. We do not want to be left altered for the worse with biometric monitoring and vaccine passes for travel. Equally, do we want to be the kind of country that punishes people for going to parties? We need a bonfire of cruelties and injustice, and pardons for all.
  12. Even AI has Partygate sussed ... 'write a short poem about government officials partying during a supposed deadly pandemic' ChatGPT In times of crisis, when fear runs deep, A tale unfolds where leaders sleep. Amidst a pandemic's deadly spread, Government officials dance instead. They gather in halls of opulence, With laughter and revelry, no recompense. Ignoring the suffering, the pain and loss, They indulge in merriment, no matter the cost. While people suffer, lives torn apart, They dance and feast with reckless heart. Their masks forgotten, their duties forsaken, In the haze of indulgence, the truth is shaken. But truth, like whispers, cannot be contained, And the people rise, their voices unchained. For in the darkness, hope remains, A flame ignited by shared disdain. The world watches, their eyes awake, To those who lead for their own sake. The dance will end, the revelry fade, As accountability emerges, a price is paid. For power lies in the hands of the just, And betrayal ignites the fire of trust. So let this poem serve as a reminder true, That leaders are meant to serve, not to pursue Self-interests and pleasures, while others grieve, For in unity and compassion, we shall achieve, A world where officials prioritize our care, And the spirit of humanity, we all bear.
  13. You look familiar? Did I ever shoot you with my plastic Laramie rifle? I used to love the 'safe' toys we played with in those days. 'Split-the-Kipper' with a sheath knife in the school field was a popular game for the young. I also remember 'practising' knife throwing with my trusty (rusty?) sheath knife into the back of my bedroom door! Ah, such halcyon days!
  14. I agree that plastics are over-used on trivial things, but it's nonsensical to do away with plastics altogether. As with 'Just Stop Oil,' if it ever happened most of us would die.
  15. I feel a song coming on ... Plastic Jesus I don't care if it rains or freezes 'Long as I got my Plastic Jesus Sittin' on the dashboard of my car. Comes in colors, pink and pleasant Glows in the dark 'cause it's iridescent Take it with you when you travel far.
  16. It's gonna happen, isn't it? Especially since the Plandemic, grief is going to be 'trending' (to put it in the callous language of today's influencers). I suppose such a project would have it's pro's & con's, but there appear to be no technical issues that would be insurmountable in the nest year or two. Time eill tell.
  17. Maybe 'Father' is no longer politically correct. Did you see any ads for Sperm Donor's Day?
  18. While most of the arguments are based around Plant-based vs Meat-based, the most obvious solution may be the 'Flexitarian' approach, provided by the AI, ChatGPT-4 ... On the whole, which is better: a meat-based diet, or a plant-based diet? ChatGPT The question of whether a meat-based diet or a plant-based diet is better is a complex and debated topic. It is important to approach this question with an understanding that individual dietary needs, cultural factors, and ethical considerations can vary among individuals. Additionally, it's worth noting that a well-planned diet in either category can be nutritionally adequate. Plant-based diets, when properly planned, can provide numerous health benefits. They are generally rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, and have been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and certain types of cancer. Plant-based diets can also be environmentally sustainable, requiring fewer resources and producing lower greenhouse gas emissions compared to intensive animal agriculture. On the other hand, meat-based diets can provide certain essential nutrients, such as high-quality protein, vitamin B12, iron, and zinc, which can be challenging to obtain in sufficient amounts from plant-based sources alone. Meat can also be a source of complete proteins containing all the essential amino acids necessary for human health. Ultimately, the key to a healthy diet lies in balance and variety. It is possible to follow a healthy diet that includes moderate amounts of meat while emphasizing plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. This approach, known as a flexitarian or semi-vegetarian diet, can provide the benefits of both plant-based and animal-based foods. It's worth mentioning that individual health needs, ethical considerations (such as animal welfare), environmental concerns, and cultural factors can all influence one's choice of diet. Consulting with a healthcare professional or a registered dietitian can help you make informed decisions based on your specific nutritional requirements and personal values. To be honest, that's what I've been eating all of my life. Let's face it: GMO crops and mRNA vaccines for farm animals are going to make us all ill or kill us off anyway!
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