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webtrekker

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webtrekker last won the day on April 12

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  1. Great meme by Bob Moran, entitled 'COUGH' ...
  2. Hey, you Flethers, get out there tomorrow and see what colour they've painted the Moon! Full Lunar Eclipse To Bring Super Blood Moon Published on May 15, 2022 Written by Georgina Rannard One of our planet’s most stunning sights is coming to the skies – a super blood Moon. In the year’s only full lunar eclipse, Earth will come between the Sun and the Moon. It will be visible with the naked eye before dawn on Monday in most of Europe. The Americas will get a great view on Sunday evening. Falling fully into Earth’s shadow, the Moon will slowly darken before turning dusky red. The Moon will appear larger than usual because it will be at its closest point to Earth of its orbit, giving it the name super Moon. It will also be called a super flower blood Moon. In the Northern Hemisphere, a full moon in May is often called a flower Moon because it coincides with the Spring flowers. The only sunlight reaching the Moon during the full eclipse will be passing through the Earth’s atmosphere. This light will be blood red, from all Earth’s sunrises and sunsets reflected on to the Moon’s surface, explains Dr Gregory Brown, astronomer at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. “You’ll actually be seeing every sunrise and every sunset occurring around the Earth at once. All of that light will be projected on to the Moon,” he told BBC News. On Monday, western parts of Europe will get a good but short view as the Moon will set during the eclipse. Look low on the horizon between 0230 and 0430 BST and you’ll see the moon falling into shadow before glowing red. It should be visible in Africa too. In the UK watching from a high vantage point like a hill or tall building will be essential because of the Moon’s very low position in the sky. The UK will get a better view of the earlier part of the eclipse, Dr Brown explains. As Earth’s shadow starts to cover the Moon, it slowly takes a bite out of it. The Moon will be fully eclipsed and red at 0429 BST. It will then set, though the eclipse will continue until 0750 BST. The Americas will be treated to the full spectacle, lasting 84 minutes. If you’re in western US and Canada, the time to watch the horizon is Sunday evening as the Moon rises. You can see it with the naked eye, while looking through binoculars or a small telescope will enhance the red colour. Of course, the very best vantage point for witnessing this eclipse is a place very few people have been lucky enough to visit – the Moon itself. “If you were an astronaut standing on the Moon, looking back towards Earth, you’d see a red ring running around the outside of our planet,” Dr Brown explains. Source: www.bbc.co.uk
  3. Neither does it feel like you are travelling at 500mph in an aircraft. The only times you feel it are when the plane ACCELERATES or DECELERATES. When things are moving at a constant VELOCITY then you feel nothing. If the Earth were to suddenly slow down, then youd feel it. People often confuse velocity with acceleration.
  4. So why did mariners find the need for a 'Crow's Nest' placed high on the mast when apparently it was never needed if you could spot ships just as well from the deck?
  5. Ships disappear from view over the horizon. What do you not understand about that? And as for all those nutters that say the Earth has to be flat because the horizon is level all around, well that's just plain lunacy!
  6. In other words: 'You're all in for a right shafting! Now bend over and touch those toes ...'
  7. Actually, this discussion is becoming pointless now. If you can't do your own calculations and show them here then posting a video of someone else's calculations doesn't really show that you understand what's going on. I'll listen to anyone who can provide their own proof to back up their arguments but just posting some copy&paste stuff or youtube nonsense is, frankly, a waste of everyone's time. In my opinion, anyway!
  8. Ok. Apologies for the messy drawing but I've had to do it myself ... I've stuck with the 61° angle as used in the video you posted Angles are measured upwards from the Observer's horizon. The overhead 90° angle is of course tangential to the surface of the (spherical!) Earth.
  9. sorry, but that's a load of nonsense. This person is making the assumption that the Earth is flat. Where is the proof of this? I myself could make the assumption that the Earth was a cube and come up with an even stupider answer! Doing the same calculation for a spherical Earth would result in a wildly different answer due to the curvature between the observer and the point at which the Moon was predicted to be exactly overhead. Not only would the angles be affected but also the baseline would be part of a Great Circle, not flat.
  10. Cleaner life? Piston engined aircraft use LEADED fuel!
  11. And yet The Simpsons insist it is a spherical globe ...
  12. Who on earth are Reds Rhetoric and kitty kat? I asked for a copy of the actual calculation that proed the Moon was 3400 miles away, or at least a link to it. When people can',t or won't answer my questions, I tend to believe they don't know what they are talking about. Sorry.
  13. Ok, let's do the maths then. You say the Moon is 3,400 miles from Earth. I'll have to assume you mean from the surface of the Earth since the Earth has a radius of near enough 4,000 miles so that rules out measuring from the centre! Anyway, the radius of the Moon can then be calculated, given that we already know for a fact that the angle of a full Moon subtended at the viewer's eye is 0.52°. So the calculation is simply ... tan(0.52/2) x 3400 = 15.43 miles!!! So you are saying that the diameter of the Moon is about 31 miles? I doubt a 31 mile diameter object 3,400 miles away would affect the ocean tides in a way that could even be measured. Or maybe the Moon is supermassive?
  14. AI can be very creative. Consider the Go competition between Korean Lee Sedol (World Champion, 9th Dan) and Deep Mind's AlphaGo AI system. AlphaGo beat Lee 4:1 out of 5 games. There was one particular move made by AlphaGo in the second match (move number 37) that completely blew the minds of all the experts watching as well as Lee himself and even the AlphaGo team. If you have some time to spare watch this. It's a great documentary ...
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