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Unite for Freedom - MARBLE ARCH - FINAL - STAY AWAY FROM KINGS CROSS UPDATE COMING ON TELEGRAM

 

HEAD FOR MARBLE ARCH

 

NO LONGER BEING HELD AT KINGS CROSS STATION .


PLEASE NOTE THE LOCATION HAS CHANGED DUE TO KETTLING TACTICS RECENTLY.

 

WILL  NOT BE AT KINGS CROSS STATION 


 

"Action is key.

We will be gathering together at 

SOMEWHERE ANNOUNCED ON TELEGRAM AT 11.30 - LONDON  to hear from inspirational speakers about actions that we can take as a collective before taking to the streets to show our power, raise awareness and inspire more to join us.

 

Now is the time to prepare and gather - together is the only way we will restore our true liberties and rights."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I wish I could join. Unfortunately I'm in Madrid and travel is not option anymore. One more freedom taken away. There have been protests and riots all over the world but unfortunately the majority just buys the "save lives" crap and just obbey. This obedience is sickening, we need to fight by any means. 

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I was in Madrid 3 weeks ago , very sad to see how programmed the people are over there, I allways thought the Spanish had a bit of rebellion in them . I didn’t see a single person without a mask . I actually had a croissant thrown at my head in the street for not wearing a mask ! Disgusted looks and afew near arguments but they soon ended as I don’t speak Spanish haha. 
Anyway back to the point , after tonight’s million mask march we really need to come up with ideas on how to carry on protesting because tonight the police just started attacking and arresting from the get go and I can see all anti lockdown protests been the same  . 

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I have never been on a march.  I can't stand what's going on with all this.  Everything being said in Alternative news is starting to come out in the mainstream - well some.  Can anyone wiser protesters than me give me any tips to stay safe should things go wrong?  I'm 5ft 3in and couldn't fight my out of a paper bag and I am not that brave when it comes to police and their horses.  Can someone give me some advice on how it goes as I really am not missing this one at the end of Nov.  Just not sure how it goes....Thanks

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1 hour ago, Maisie said:

I have never been on a march.  I can't stand what's going on with all this.  Everything being said in Alternative news is starting to come out in the mainstream - well some.  Can anyone wiser protesters than me give me any tips to stay safe should things go wrong?  I'm 5ft 3in and couldn't fight my out of a paper bag and I am not that brave when it comes to police and their horses.  Can someone give me some advice on how it goes as I really am not missing this one at the end of Nov.  Just not sure how it goes....Thanks

Carry a face mask, just in case. 

Don't hang around at the end of the march, when most of the trouble, if any, tends to occur. Stand behind people bigger than you. You should be OK. 

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Thank you for the advice - I'll stay well clear of any trouble and I won't struggle to find taller people to stand behind!.  Hopefully see you all there!

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I think a lot of good folks really miss the point on occasion. The PTB don't ever want people out on the streets protesting anything. Well, unless it is one of their own staged protests. The thing to really not do is to gather in one place. If you do, then you will be vulnerable to the police kettling you. You want a protest to cover a wide area and to last a long time, so that you can all come and go as you please. Make it as informal as possible. Walk around slowly in pairs and hand out some leaflets, to members of the public willing to take them, if you have any. Make sure that every single one of you films everything. Don't engage in any acts of meaningless street wrestling with the Copidiots. Wear your masks and socially distance from other pairs. Sing Christmas carols too (Hey, it's the end of November, so why not?). There is nothing that the PTB will hate more, than the thought of people having peacefully gotten out there and demonstrated, before peacefully returning home again. You will be taking the piss out of them big time and the power will all be yours!      

  • Like 3
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I like the sound of the more covert protest.  I think more people would come out for it as most people don't want a fight with the police.  But more and more of us first timers are coming on this march on Nov 27th but we are all out of our league having never protested before.  The police are also morphing into some type of SS.  Stopping an old lady and making her go back into the home?  Are the old peoples homes the first genocidal camps?  I am so scared of this.  Really.  And so many people I know are too.  But going on a protest that is absolutely going to attract police in all their get up is a really scary thing for some of us to do.  Having said that I cannot stand the WOKE advertisements, programmers, reporters - all ticking several boxes at a time and absolutely everywhere. I'm self employed and Boris Johnson has more or less taken my livelihood away with bull shit figures.For sure this has awakened my group (never protested/but little faith in government) he is treating all of us like we can't do the math.  Anyway rant over.

  • Like 2
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On 11/15/2020 at 12:13 PM, Maisie said:

I like the sound of the more covert protest.

 

What I suggested was very open. Not covert at all.

  

On 11/15/2020 at 12:13 PM, Maisie said:

But more and more of us first timers are coming on this march on Nov 27th but we are all out of our league having never protested before. 

 

Right, so don't give anyone an excuse to throw mud at you. I think it is on 28th November by the way, unless someone recently changed the date.

  

On 11/15/2020 at 12:13 PM, Maisie said:

The police are also morphing into some type of SS.

 

Slowly, but surely, it does seem that way.

  • Like 1
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PLEASE NOTE - BATTERSEA PARK NO LONGER THE LOCATION.

 

LONDON CITY CENTER - LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED.

 

THANKS....

BC
 

  • Like 1
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On 11/11/2020 at 3:40 PM, Maisie said:

I have never been on a march.  I can't stand what's going on with all this.  Everything being said in Alternative news is starting to come out in the mainstream - well some.  Can anyone wiser protesters than me give me any tips to stay safe should things go wrong?  I'm 5ft 3in and couldn't fight my out of a paper bag and I am not that brave when it comes to police and their horses.  Can someone give me some advice on how it goes as I really am not missing this one at the end of Nov.  Just not sure how it goes....Thanks

Good for you Maisie   its important more than ever for all  who see the lies for what they are, to come together & make a stand , walking side by side peacefully  is all that's required & being there is what makes a difference....

lies saying fun – TheFunnyPlaceReal Eyes Realize Real Lies Sad Quote « QUOTEZ○CO

  • Like 2
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On 11/12/2020 at 5:25 AM, Maisie said:

Thank you for the advice - I'll stay well clear of any trouble and I won't struggle to find taller people to stand behind!.  Hopefully see you all there!

Maisie i'm ging to try my damndest to get there this weekend ...i'm 6'4'' and really ugly so if you want you can hide behind me and i purposly sidle off before the end just to pull a couple of plain clothes 'observers' with me..(they followed me up oxford st last time i was there and their antics trying to get a photograph of me was a joy to behold) look for a 6ft black V for vendetta flag with a guy fawkes stencil in the middle of the V...you'll find me attached to it

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PEOPLE OF THIS ONCE FREE NATION  - IF YOU ARE AWAKE TO THE LIES & BULLSHIT  - NOW IS THE TIME TO STAND UP & SHOW OUT- DO NOT ALLOW THESE CRIMINAL-ACTS OF TREASON TO  CONTINUE - INFECTING HOW YOU LIVE YOUR LIFE -  WE NEED TO RISE UP & WAKE THE MANY !!!,     LEAVING JUST THE FEW ..................  

                                                                   

                                                                            LONDON IS CALLING 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
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On 11/8/2020 at 12:03 PM, John Steed said:

Is it ok to attend if I wear a mask please I have reasons! 


The whole idea is freedom - freedom of choice.
Do what you want.
 

  • Like 1
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1 hour ago, Joebman said:

Does anyone else think that Kings X isn’t the best location to choose ? 

 

Doesn't make sense to me neither.

 

The organisers wrote  "PLEASE NOTE THE LOCATION HAS CHANGED DUE TO KETTLING TACTICS RECENTLY".   It's easier to be

kettled at Kings Cross Station, than Battersea Park.

Edited by Golden Retriever
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2 hours ago, Golden Retriever said:

Doesn't make sense to me neither.


l believe the thinking was to give the PTB as little time to plan as possible.
l'm sure they've already had lots of meetings and had plans for the Park.
Now they have little time to go through the same process.

 

And.....Kings X is a big building with many entrances / exits, no ?
lt would also be hard to avoid getting into MSM if they kettle people inside the station.
lt could be done much quieter and 'out of sight' in the  Park ?
 

Just some thoughts....
 

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Yeah and kings X has a British Transport Police police station inside so already it seems a bad idea to hold a rally next to a police station. Second off the square outside isn’t very big , easy to be kettled . Anyone arriving into kings X via train will be pulled. The streets running around kings X don’t seem ideal either . But maybe I’m wrong let’s see how it goes ! 

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22 minutes ago, Joebman said:

Yeah and kings X has a British Transport Police police station inside so already it seems a bad idea to hold a rally next to a police station. Second off the square outside isn’t very big , easy to be kettled . Anyone arriving into kings X via train will be pulled. The streets running around kings X don’t seem ideal either . But maybe I’m wrong let’s see how it goes ! 

 

I absolutely agree with you. 

 

It makes much more sense to hold the protest in one of the many London Parks.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kettling

 

The UK police have a history of this kettling practice.

 

United Kingdom

The Battle of Orgreave, a violent day in the year long Miners' Strike in Great Britain, has been cited as an early example of police kettling a crowd of protesters.[27]

Parliament Square Disability Rights Demonstration, 1995

The kettling tactic was used in the UK against disabled people during a Disability Rights Demonstration in Parliament Square, London, in October 1995. [28]

N30 anti-WTO demonstration, 1999

The kettling tactic was used in the UK at the N30 anti-WTO protest at Euston station, London (parallel to the shut-down of the meeting in Seattle) on November 30, 1999.[29] It was a development of previously used police cordoning tactics - the difference was the long length of time, constant impermeability and the small size of the kettle.

May Day 2001

The tactic was used in the UK by the London Metropolitan Police during the May Day riots of 2001 to contain demonstrators. However, the action also resulted in large numbers of bystanders as well as peaceful demonstrators being detained in Oxford Circus.[2]

G8 summit, 2005

Kettling was later used at protests against the 31st G8 summit, held in 2005.[30]

G20, 2009

Kettling was used once again during the 2009 G-20 London summit protests outside the Bank of England, as part of the police Territorial Support Group's "Operation Glencoe".[2] When police started to allow protesters to leave the kettle, they were photographed by Forward Intelligence Teams and told to give their names and addresses. Some refused to do so and were forced back into the kettle by police.[31] A number of complaints over the tactic were subsequently made to the Independent Police Complaints Commission.[32] Bob Broadhurst, the commanding officer during the protests, said that, "kettling was the best option" to counter the potential of widespread disruption by protesters".[33]

On April 15, 2009, Scotland Yard ordered a review of these tactics. Criticism of the policing of demonstrations has been increasing, and amateur video footage which recorded two incidents of violent police behaviour, notably the death of Ian Tomlinson, brought police tactics into the media spotlight. The incidents were said by Sir Paul Stephenson, Metropolitan Police Commissioner, to be "clearly disturbing",[34] and Stephenson ordered the review to consider whether the tactic is "appropriate and proportionate".[34] The video footage also showed that police officers were concealing their shoulder identification numbers whilst on duty.[35]

An inquiry was held by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) into an incident during the G20 protests, in which a woman held in a kettle suffered injuries from police action and subsequently experienced a suspected miscarriage. The inquiry concluded in August 2009 that the Metropolitan Police should review its crowd control methods, including the tactic of kettling.[36]

Denis O'Connor, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Constabulary, said in a report concerning the policing of the G20 protests that some police commanders did not understand the House of Lords' ruling[37] regarding kettling. He also stated that containing protesters in a kettle was "inadequate" and belonged to a "different era" of policing. He did not suggest that kettling should be abandoned but rather that the methods must be adapted so that peaceful protesters and bystanders are able to leave the kettle.[38] The report also commissioned a survey, conducted by MORI which found that the majority of the UK public do feel that the use of kettling is appropriate in some situations. Depending on the circumstances, between 10% and 20% of those questioned feel that it is never appropriate to contain people in this way.[39]

In April 2011, the High Court of Justice ruled that kettling on that occasion was illegal, and it set out new guidelines as to when police were permitted to kettle protesters.[40] This means that the police "may only take such preventive action as a last resort catering for situations about to descend into violence".[41] Police would still legally be allowed to kettle if they had reason to believe that violence would break out.[original research?]

Student protests, 2010

Kettling was used during the 24 November 2010 student protest in London and in various other locations around the country. Guardian blogger Dave Hill thought the kettling was in retrospect "probably inevitable", after the protest two weeks before had led to damage at the Conservative party headquarters.[42] In July 2011 three school children challenged the use of kettling of children at this protest. They sought a judicial review in the High Court, arguing it broke the laws of the European Convention on Human Rights, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Children Act 2004, mainly the right to protest and the safety of children.[43]

Kettling was used to contain student protesters in Parliament Square on 9 December 2010 and thereafter on Westminster Bridge.[44] Protesters were trapped in Trafalgar Square and other landmarks for up to nine hours. An anaesthetist from Aberdeen Royal Infirmary working as part of a field hospital said that there was a serious health and safety risk to people trapped in the kettle and some suffered crush injuries whilst others were nearly pushed off Westminster Bridge into the freezing Thames, likening it to the Hillsborough disaster.[45]

Anti-Cuts protests, 2011

Kettling was again used at the March 2011 anti-cuts protest in London. Activists were given assurances by Metropolitan police that they would be shown to safety after the protest, which was described as non-violent and sensible. Once outside, the protesters were kettled, handcuffed and taken into custody.[46]

In 2012, kettling was deemed lawful, overturning a previous High Court ruling. The ruling was immediately criticised by protesters and their lawyers, who plan to take the matter to the Supreme Court.[47]

Legal challenges

Following the use of "kettling" during the May Day protest in 2001, two people who had been corralled by the police at Oxford Circus sued the Metropolitan Police for wrongful detention, alleging that it was in breach of the European Convention of Human Rights, and that they had been held without access to food, water or toilets.[48] The pair lost their court action in 2005,[49] and their appeal failed in 2007[50] when the Court of Appeal backed the High Court ruling.

In 2009, Austin v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis,[51] a ruling by the House of Lords, decided that the High Court was entitled to take into consideration the "purpose" of the deprivation of liberty before deciding if human rights laws applied at all.[52] Summing up, Lord Hope said:

There is room, even in the case of fundamental rights as to whose application no restriction or limitation is permitted by the Convention, for a pragmatic approach which takes full account of all the circumstances.

— Baron Hope of Craighead, quoted in The Guardian[53]

A plaintiff from the 2001 protest, along with three non-protesting members of the public who had been kettled by police, took an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights, claiming that kettling violated Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights, the right to liberty and security. It was reported:

Austin, who the court accepted was a lawful and peaceful demonstrator prevented by her detention from collecting her child, is to take her case to the European Court of Human Rights. It is to be hoped the ECHR will look again at the question of whether the "balance" and "public safety" is all on the side of allowing the police to carry out long containments or whether such imprisonment does not after all breach fundamental rights.

— Louise Christian, The Guardian[53]

In March 2012 the Court ruled that kettling was lawful and that the Metropolitan Police were entitled to detain groups of people as "the least intrusive and most effective means to protect the public from violence". On the issues related to the European Convention on Human Rights, the court ruled:[3]

Article 5 did not have to be construed in such a way as to make it impracticable for the police to fulfil their duties of maintaining order and protecting the public.

— Grand Chamber, European Court of Human Rights, Ruling, March 2012[3]

 

Edited by Golden Retriever
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6 minutes ago, Golden Retriever said:

along with three non-protesting members of the public who had been kettled by police, took an appeal


Perhaps there'll be a lot more than 3 people caught up if they use kettling at such a big and busy station ?
That might cause a huge 'public' fuss ?

Just playing 'devils advocate' here....l have no idea why Kings X has been made the venue,
BC

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Why not multiple venues?

 

I know many people will want to hear speakers but surely many more are there for the defiance itself.

 

Give people say five major meeting places.

 

You could even split the speakers up if there was sufficient resource.

 

Why make it easy for for porky?

  • Like 2
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If Joe Public travelling into or out of Kings Cross (not for the protest) have their trains cancelled or diverted and/or if Joe Public

not sympathetic to the protest are kettled, this will impact negatively on those trying to expose the Covid fraud. The media will

love it.

 

As Nobby said, multiple venues is a great idea and imo open spaces.

 

Here's an interesting pdf for the organisers to look at, if anyone is in touch with them.

 

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200809/cmselect/cmhaff/418/418.pdf

 

excerpt

 

House of Commons Home Affairs Committee Policing of the G20 Protests Eighth Report of Session 2008–09

 

Relations with the Media

5.The importance of an unencumbered media, free to report on large-scale events like the G20 Protests, is self-evident, not just as an end in itself but because a good relationship between the media and the police can be mutually beneficial. As ACC Duncan McCausland of the Police Service of Northern Ireland told us: We have found it far easier, in effect to help the media do their job and the media work with us in terms of what we are trying to achieve on the day, because the media are part of the community and part of potentially providing a win-win situation and a compromise.

 

 

Edited by Golden Retriever
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